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for 2017 TASH Conference
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Each year, the TASH Conference brings together a diverse community of stakeholders who gain information, learn about resources, and connect with others across the country to strengthen the disability field. This year’s conference theme, “Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion,” shows the resilience of individuals with disabilities and their families across the lifespan. Conference attendees will celebrate their passion for disability rights, civil rights, and human rights while exploring inclusive communities, schools, and workplaces that support people with disabilities, including those with complex support needs. Return to TASH website.

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Tuesday, December 12
 

12:00pm

TASH Board of Directors Meeting
This meeting is open to TASH Board Members only.

Moderators
Tuesday December 12, 2017 12:00pm - 6:00pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303
 
Wednesday, December 13
 

7:59am

About Wednesday Workshops
Wednesday Workshops are short-course workshops that are delivered by teams of presenters around a particular topic in a scheduled room for 1.5-3 hours. Workshops allow attendees to dive into popular topics in more depth. Workshops will take place on Wednesday only.

Wednesday December 13, 2017 7:59am - 5:00pm
TBA

8:00am

Employment Track: Opening Remarks
Limited Capacity seats available

Details coming soon!

Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 8:30am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Preserving Autonomy: Rethinking Guardianship
Limited Capacity seats available

Setting up guardianship or conserving a person with disabilities is demeaning and conflicts with current best practices. The outcome for the person is devastating and stigmatizing. We must rethink this common, but outdated practice and instead use alternatives and provide the supports, help and accommodations persons need to exercise choice, have the preferences honored and to participate in our communities as equal citizens.

Speakers

Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 10:00am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Access for All: Curricular Accommodations and Modifications
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion", by developing a deep understanding of how to provide students with complex needs an equitable education. Equipping participants with curricular adaptation strategies strengthens the disability field and fosters the opportunity for all students to have access to the general education curriculum alongside their peers. Designing and providing curricular accommodations and modifications are essential to effective inclusive educational practices. With a focus on students with significant disabilities and support needs, this hands-on interactive workshop teaches a diverse community of stakeholders how to design curriculum that is accessible to all students. An understanding of universal design for learning and the importance of collaboration will be highlighted. Peer supports and technology supports will also be embedded. Collaboratively, participants will apply strategies in the following seven areas: differentiated content, accessible directions, streamlining the curriculum, individualized lesson objectives, assignment layouts, infusing individual goals, and classroom assessments. In order to ensure all students' needs are met in an inclusive setting, participants will understand the benefits of and learn how to use the following resources: a student profile, academic unit lesson plan, and an infused skills grid. Students have the right to a free and appropriate public education and this workshop will prepare participants with the knowledge and resources to provide all students with an equitable education.

Speakers

Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Behavior Change is a Family Affair: Empowering Family Partnerships in PBIS Implementation
Limited Capacity seats available

Participants in this interactive and hands-on workshop will explore best practices for family partnerships in school-wide PBS, create predictable routines and a PBS home matrix as well as develop a strength-based family-friendly positive behavior support plan.

Speakers

Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Community Building for Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

For nearly nine years, a group of ordinary people living across the state of Georgia have been actively learning together how to work for social justice and build opportunities for intentional and reciprocal relationships between people with and without disabilities. Drawing from approaches and philosophies such as Asset Based Community Development, Popular Education, Intersectionality, Person Centered Values, and Visionary Organizing, we have learned much about the conditions that encourage all members of a community to contribute and meaningfully participate in civic life, enhance social connections through collective action, and build more avenues to natural supports and relationships outside of human services. Our approach centers people who live at the intersection of multiple marginalized identities, whether they have a disability and/or they are a person of color, LGBTQ, poor, an immigrant, a refugee, or have experienced homelessness or incarceration. We are finding ways to build solidarity and reciprocity across and among identity lines and are learning to become better allies with others working to overcome the injustice of social exclusion, whatever its cause. This workshop will include an in-depth overview of our work and approach through storytelling and interactive, experiential large and small group activities. Participants will be offered practical ways of how to take these ideas and use them back home.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Partnering With Family Leaders Across Cultures: More Than Just an Invitation and Translation
Limited Capacity seats available

As we all know, the demographic in the United States has been changing rapidly with an increasing number of families whose first language is not English. Navigating systems of care for these families is so daunting that many of these families do not know where to turn. This workshop is a panel from different professionals who live the lives who will share their unique perspectives on how to effectively work with families from culturally diverse backgrounds, to help bridge gaps in communication, cultural belief, disability attitude, social stigma, and increase the participation of parents from diverse backgrounds.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

TASH Doctoral Students and Beginning Special Education Faculty Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

This Wednesday session is meant for you! Come meet each other and nationally-recognized professors and researchers with successful records as college and university faculty who are willing to share their strategies with you.
Agenda: TBA

Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

EFSLMP and PIE: Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the most important aspects that allow individuals to live the lives they desire is employment. Employment not only gives individuals purpose, but employment also provides them the means to live independent lives. Through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) and the Partnerships in Employment (PIE) programs, the federal government is supporting states as they work to change their policies in order to make competitive integrated employment (CIE) more accessible to more people with disabilities. Learn about the similarities and differences between EFSLMP and PIE, the technical assistance each provides, and the successful strategies states have used to change policy to increase CIE.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Guided Group Discovery: Successful Employment through Partnerships
Limited Capacity seats available

Guided Group Discovery (GGD) is a set of strategies that can benefit any job seeker who faces barriers to employment. GGD is a universal design approach that is very effective for people with disabilities. It is used in partnership with a number of systems, so that people can receive support through multiple agencies at the same time, as needed. Youth and adults with disabilities, for example, can engage in Guided Group Discovery that is supported by any combination of agencies, including vocational rehabilitation, developmental disabilities, behavioral health, the public workforce system, Centers for Independent Living, community rehabilitation agencies, foster care agencies, homeless services providers, and others. This provides more support for job seekers and enables agencies to leverage each other's resources. LEAD Center staff will discuss the pilot projects it has supported that used Guided Group Discovery in American Job Centers (also known as One-Stop Career Centers) in collaboration with a variety of partners. These strategies are similar to more traditional facilitated Discovery, in that they serve as an alternative assessment tool that identifies the strengths and ideal conditions of employment for job seekers with and without disabilities. GGD assists people in securing and maintaining employment by supporting them in small groups to create their own individual blueprint to guide their job search process. GDD, like other forms of Discovery, serves as the cornerstone for customized employment, which increasingly is being used as a universal design approach by workforce development professionals.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:15am

Seamless Transition: The Potential of WIOA
Limited Capacity seats available

Wouldn't it be ideal if the culmination of K-12 education for youth with disabilities was a job and a clear career path? As youth make the transition from being students to young adults, the ideal would be that they move seamlessly from being a student to an employee, leading to a meaningful job and career. This is indeed the gold standard of transition outcomes. With what we now know, there is no reason not to expect this to be the desired outcome for every student who receives special education services in today's high schools. What really works so that students with disabilities seamlessly transition to adult employment? How can we organize education and vocational rehabilitation services for youth so they leave school with a job? This presentation will discuss findings from research done through TransCens Disability Rehabilitation Research Project and experience in implementing Pre-employment transition services for youth with disabilities.

Speakers

Wednesday December 13, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:15am

The Rural Routes to Employment Project - Lessons learned
Limited Capacity seats available

In rural areas across the country a lack of employment opportunity is a shared concern. This is not a disability specific issue but is a shared concern for all citizens. Rural areas, however, often offer unique opportunities to expand employment because of the greater sense of community, the inventiveness that comes from a lack of resources and the fact that for most small communities, the concerns of economic development, jobs, and post-school success are shared by all. This presentation will tell the stories of adult providers and transition staff over the course of this five-year Rural Routes to Employment Project: Barriers identified|Practices developed | Economic Development approaches utilized. All which can be easily adopted and become in many instances solutions to the increasing employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:15am

Everyone Communicates: TASH's Call to Action
Limited Capacity seats available

This panel will be comprised of AAC users, researchers, and advocates and will focus on how to move TASH's communication campaign forward. This panel will examine some of the myths and definitions of AAC and AAC users, researchers, and advocates will discuss ways to move TASH forward with some common definitions, goals, and purposes.

Wednesday December 13, 2017 10:15am - 12:15pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:15am

Supported Decision Making in Action throughout the LifeSpan
Limited Capacity seats available

Supported Decision Making (SDM) is being embraced throughout the country to help people gain and/or maintain control of their life. Used with both children and adults living with disabilities, it is a process whereby people get the assistance they need and want to understand the situations and choices they face, so they can make life decisions for themselves. Implementing this approach requires a change in thinking about how life decisions are made and how people are supported - starting with the acknowledgement that all people need and get help making decisions in the natural course of life - starting as early as possible. This session will look at the emerging trends and practices around supported decision-making (SDM) as an alternative to guardianship and as a strategy for helping people become better decision-makers over their life time. Presenters will share stories of how this has worked to assist children and adults with developmental disabilities retain and regain individual rights and life control from the professional, legal and family perspectives.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 10:15am - 12:15pm
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

12:45pm

Project FOCUS: From College to Competitive Employment for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

While typical students graduate high school after four years and transition to work and or higher education, these options are historically not available to students with intellectual disabilities. This presentation will describe Project FOCUS (Focusing Opportunities with Community and University Support). The University of Arizona's College of Education in collaboration with local school districts supports this fully inclusive postsecondary transition option for young adults, age 18-22 who have significant intellectual disabilities. Project FOCUS facilitates access and inclusion to the University of Arizona's academic courses, internship experiences, and college life events in order to increase each student's independence, employability, and quality of life. Prior to starting their college experience, each student has a person-centered plan, then receive individualized academic, employment, social, and emotional instruction throughout the two year program. Students are supported by same-aged undergraduate peer mentors who are trained to implement best practices. Project FOCUS is committed to support students and their families build a bridge to gainful employment through partnerships with local businesses and state service agencies, and develop meaningful friendships, greater self-determination, and self-confidence. These experiences, skills, and collaborations gained positively influence and reshape community perceptions of individuals who have significant intellectual disabilities for greater equity for all.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 12:45pm - 1:45pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

12:45pm

The ABLE Act and Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

The ABLE Act now allows certain individuals with disabilities the opportunity to save money without jeopardizing their federally funded means tested benefits (such as Medicaid and SSI). Additionally, these funds are to be used for qualified disability related expenses that help the person with a disability increase and/or maintain their health, independence and quality of life (including employment related expenses). This presentation will help the audience better understand the basics components of being an ABLE account owner, as well as how having an ABLE account could help the beneficiary obtain and maintain competitive integrated employment.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 12:45pm - 1:45pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

International Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Details coming soon!

Speakers

Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Research Colloquium
Limited Capacity seats available

Details coming soon!

Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
L405-L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

A Roadmap for Partnering to Create Meaningful Self-Determined Lives
Limited Capacity seats available

During this workshop, we will share strategies that are designed to embrace the principles of person-centered planning, self-direction and supported decision making, all of which increase opportunities for individuals with disabilities to enjoy full citizenship and maintain choice and control over their long-term services and supports (LTSS). These strategies provide people, professionals, and caregivers with reliable techniques to re-imagine the possibilities for meeting increasing support needs and achieving individual goals. Just as the civil rights movement had leaders from varying backgrounds, true citizenship and community inclusion for people with different abilities is not possible without the efforts and partnership of individuals and organizations who have varying roles in the long-term services and supports system and the community as a whole. This engaging and interactive workshop will provide opportunities for attendees to learn how three Wisconsin partners - a self-advocate, a representative state advocacy organization Disabilities, and a long-term care self-directed service provider organization collaborate to advance true citizenship and community inclusion for people with disabilities. Attendees will learn from an individual whose resilience has created a life that has spanned early experiences in a state institution to her current leadership role as executive director of a statewide advocacy organization. They will hear from a representative of Wisconsin’s Board for People with Developmental Disabilities about strategies to build grassroots advocacy networks that empower all individuals to be heard in their communities. The presentation team also includes representatives from an organization that operates one of the largest and most comprehensive self-directed long-term services and support programs in the country. Self-direction and advocacy put the person and their loved ones in the driver’s seat to control where, when, and how supports are provided. We will show you ways to help facilitate that. Choice and control through self-direction benefits not only the person, but can produce tangible benefits for state programs as well. Individuals self-directing their long-term services and supports through the Wisconsin IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct) program have, on average, spent 83% of their allocated budgets. You will learn how self-direction has engaged individuals, as well as their family and support networks, to implement real change. You’ll also learn how to expand the capacity for services that sustain full lives and create valued roles in local communities. Approximately 90 percent of individuals live in a home that they own, rent, or share with family or friends, and less than two percent are disenrolled from the program due to placement in a licensed facility, including nursing homes.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Living Life in Color: Tools for Support Teams to Promote Community Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

"The colors of lifes journey should be bold and brilliant. Many people's lives are gray. People can be safe and happy, but gray. We bring bold color when we strive for opportunities." -Jeff Strully At KFI, we believe that paid and natural supports for people with intellectual disabilities must focus on full community participation, with opportunities to work, live and engage alongside neighbors. This is more than just a philosophy. It calls for a constant re-examination of our practices and outcomes. For the past two TASH conferences, KFI has shared some of the strategies we have learned that support all people, particularly people with challenging behavior, to live lives of full inclusion in their communities. After each of these sessions, our audience has asked for more information about how to engage support teams: staff, families, neighbors, friends, etc., in doing this challenging work. This Session will focus on facilitating the teamwork necessary to move beyond the mundane and engage people in meaningful lives. Our work builds on true person centered planning and requires a team that believes in the person and the community; a team that can see possibilities and build capacity for both. In our experience, this dream team does not just "happen". It requires thoughtful and emboldening leadership and communication. In a system where getting paid often means getting people "ready for life", it is too easy to get sidetracked with things like personal care routines, housework and laundry, meal preparation, and checkbook balancing. We don't necessarily look forward to doing these things; but they are precursors to work and leisure pursuits. This presentation will offer strategies to challenge teams to consider how the way they provide daily supports impacts how the person supported lives their life and contributes to their community. With positive proactive leadership, support teams can meet complex daily needs, at the same time they are doing the important work of building connections and supporting community life engagement.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
L503 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

The Power of Valued Social Roles: Accessing the Good Life
Limited Capacity seats available

Many person-centered planning approaches continue to lead people to service based lives, often known as having a good but paid life. Understanding the devaluation people with disabilities live with, the concepts of heightened vulnerability and interpersonal identification, in addition to the power of valued social roles, can assist advocates, family members, and service providers in supporting people to access the good things in life. Participants will gain an understanding of devaluation and the wounds people experience when they are cast into devalued status in society. We will think about heightened vulnerability and interpersonal identification as potent advocacy tools and will explore visioning that focuses on valued social roles. We know that valued social roles can greatly impact people's lives and will discuss supporting people to acquire, strengthen, and maintain valued social roles. Through the presentation, we will address the lack of authority people with disabilities often have over their lives and supports, and what valued social roles can offer. People with disabilities need those who care about them and work with them to use understand the depth of devaluation and how to combat it through valued social roles.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:15pm

Pennhurst: A Legacy of Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion in Disability Rights
Limited Capacity seats available

Pennhurst, the infamous Pennsylvania institution opened in 1908 and finally shut down in 1987, established a legacy of social equity and human rights in disability policy, advocacy, litigation, and laws. It stands as both an epicenter and a microcosm of America's Disability Civil Rights Movement in realms of education, fair treatment, and community life. Its story is especially germane to this year's threatened cuts to Medicaid funding for individual supports and services necessary to live in the community. Against the backdrop of twelve beautifully illustrated panels chronicling Pennhurst's history, our eyewitnesses will present a story of the human costs of this failed "institutional model of care" that prevailed across our nation and the world from the 20th century to the present day. Pennhurst taught all of us why segregating individuals with intellectual and severe disabilities was and continues to be so dehumanizing and so wrong. Ultimately, the famous Pennhurst Longitudinal Study, which has been replicated many times over, proved scientifically that people are much "better off" living in the community in terms of equity, opportunity, inclusion, and consequently quality of life. Since past is often prologue, this story must be retold to current and future generations ─ so that we discontinue and never repeat these mistakes again.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:15pm - 3:30pm
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:45pm

Promoting Transition-to-Employment Through Effective Partnerships Between Health Care and Supported Employment Providers
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation focuses on the important connections between health transition and school-to-work transition efforts. With the increased emphasis on ensuring that high school students with disabilities have opportunities to prepare for the world of work, it is equally important to ensure that students are exposed to basic This presentation focuses on the important connections between health transition and school-to-work transition efforts – both of which are vital to achieving full equity, opportunity and inclusion in all aspects of community life for young people with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on ensuring that high school students with disabilities have opportunities to prepare for the world of work, it is equally important to ensure that students are exposed to basic principles of healthy living and are supported in the process of transition from pediatric to adult health care. Transition-to-work programs, operating in partnership with schools, are one avenue that can be used to deliver these concepts. Additionally, there is a growing trend within University-based medical centers to incorporate transition-to-work concepts into the medical clinical setting. Through combined and collaborative efforts such as these, youth with disabilities will enter the adult world with the skills they need to be healthy and productive employees and community members. This presentation will highlight two different approaches currently underway in South Dakota and Iowa to connect healthy living principles with transition-to-work interventions, and to bridge the worlds of health care and special education services in support of successful transition for youth with disabilities.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:45pm - 3:15pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:45pm

Tennessee's Transformation to Employment and Community First Services
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will describe the new service model initiated in the State of Tennessee as of July 1, 2016. Employment and Community First (ECF) was developed to eventually replaced the 1915c Waiver and bring in additional 2400 people with disabilities into services by the end of fiscal year 2018. The presentation gives specific details regarding the state's largest disability provider as it transitions from the previous model to the new ECF model. ECF was specifically designed for those who wish to gain employment and realize full community integration and inclusion. The details of this presentation should prove beneficial to the provider community, families, advocates, and people receiving services. It is expected that this model will be replicated in other states in coming years.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:30pm

TASH Chapter Leadership Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

TASH’s growing network of existing and developing chapters meet to share experiences, address challenges and build skills as leaders in grassroots advocacy. We will be exploring and developing action plans to address state and local issues. We will also be sharing information specific to chapter needs/interests. Individuals interested in starting a chapter in their state/region/province are welcome to attend.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 2:30pm - 5:00pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:45pm

The Role of Informed Choice in Advancing Competitive Integrated Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

Recent laws, regulations, court cases and policies have included the requirement that people with disabilities be provided the opportunity to exercise informed choice in decision-making to promote inclusion and integration into society. These contemporary developments build on principles established in the early deinstitutionalization litigation, including rights to habilitation and to community settings as a remedy for unnecessary institutionalization. This workshop will present recent regulatory, legal and policy changes that can be utilized to promote competitive integrated employment. This will include discussion of Employment First initiatives, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Final Rule, two landmark Department of Justice (DOJ) court cases (Oregon and Rhode Island) regarding sheltered workshops, the Olmstead decision by the Supreme Court and recent interpretations of the Americans with Disabilities Act.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 2:45pm - 5:00pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:30pm

Collaborating for Change: Improving Policies, Relationships and Competitive Integrated Employment Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

Historically, state agencies, community organizations, and individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities have worked independently to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes. This presentation will focus on lessons learned from 14 Partnerships in Employment state consortiums, which support stakeholder collaboration to change state and local employment policies and practices. Each state consortium brings together unique, but important partners that work together to overcome barriers to employment. Participants will hear from the national evaluator and a panel of Partnerships in Employment state consortium members from the District of Columbia, Hawaii and Utah. Topics include lessons learned about convening a consortium and improving relationships, strategies for introducing and implementing employment policies and legislation, and other project findings related to improving collaboration at the state, community, and individual level.

Wednesday December 13, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:30pm

College and Career Readiness: What Are the Critical Dimensions for Youth with Severe Disabilities?
Limited Capacity seats available

Focused attention to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and college and career readiness (CCR) has been attributed to increased secondary school reform directed at ensuring all students graduate high school prepared for adulthood. In order to successfully experience college and careers, students must have the knowledge, skills, and experiences related to both core academics as well as non-academic competencies such as growth mindsets, problem-solving, and interpersonal engagement. This study sought out insights and perspectives from national experts to understand the skills, opportunities, and supports needed to ensure students with severe disabilities are college and career ready. The results of this Delphi Study offer insights of how to best prepare youth with severe disabilities in inclusive school and workplace communities.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

PIE State Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Details coming soon!

Wednesday December 13, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

7:00pm

Film Festival
In addition to the hundreds of great presentations with the latest advancement in the field of inclusion, you'll also have the opportunity to experience the fine art of film making at the 2017 TASH Annual Conference. Times are subject to change.

Wednesday December 13, 2017 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Impreial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303
 
Thursday, December 14
 

8:00am

Quiet Room
The quiet room is available for all TASH conference attendees. The room is located on the Lobby level near the concierge desk.

Thursday December 14, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
The Exhibit Hall will be open during these times.

Thursday December 14, 2017 8:00am - 6:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:15am

Opening General Session
Ten Truths From 150 (or 200) Years Of Our Lives

How did it happen? By the time we meet at the TASH conference in December, I (Rud) will have turned 80. Ann will have turned 70. And Jay, our son, would have been 50. Add the years. The parents equal 150 years and the parents and son equal 200. What lessons have we learned? Which lessons have withstood the test of time? What are our ten truths? We subscribe to full disclosure: be ready for humility, humor, hurt, humanism, and hugs. Maybe even for knowledge that became wisdom!

Speakers
avatar for Rud & Ann Turnbull

Rud & Ann Turnbull

Rud and Ann Turnbull have been professors, researchers, and advocates for individuals with disabilities, their families, and service providers for over four decades. Between them, they have authored over 40 books (including two leading textbooks now in their 7th and 8th editions) and over 500 articles and chapters. In 1999, they were selected by the National Preservation Trust in Developmental Disabilities as two of 36 individuals who have... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 8:15am - 9:30am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Breakout Sessions (Morning) - Coming Soon!
Breakout Sessions are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 11:45am
TBA

12:00pm

Let's Connect Luncheon
Attendees will select from six luncheons to attend. Boxed lunches must be pre-ordered and paid for during the registration process.

Thursday December 14, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
TBA

1:00pm

Breakout Sessions (Afternoon) - Coming Soon!
Breakout Sessions are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 5:15pm
TBA

4:30pm

TASH Board of Directors Meeting
This meeting is open to TASH Board Members only.

Moderators
Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
TBD 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

A Collaborative Approach to Supporting Preschool Children in Inclusive Settings
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will highlight the multi-agency collaboration of the Denver Great Kids Head Start program to support children with a wide range of needs in inclusive preschool classrooms. The importance of effective early intervention for young children with disabilities and social-emotional challenges and their families is well documented. It is critical to provide quality supports and services for children in the early childhood settings utilizing research based practices for successful inclusion. Programs need to be supported by strong leadership, quality and meaningful professional development and access to ongoing behavioral and early childhood special education expertise. It is also critical that families are involved in all aspects of the child's program to build positive relationships with the staff as well as to support and nurture their young children at home. These efforts must be supported by ongoing collaborative and planning to address both the needs of young children but also classroom teaching staff. Denver's Great Kids Head Start is a multi-agency collaboration of the Mayor's Office for Education and Children, Denver Health (Early Childhood Mental Health Specialists), Sewell Child Development Center and Denver Public Schools to support approximately twelve hundred at-risk preschool children in six delegates. While Head Start mandates a minimum of 10% of these children are identified with special education needs, the agency serves a much higher number of children with developmental delays and significant emotional and mental health challenges. This session will highlight best practices in supporting inclusion of your children and supporting families in staff through examples of tools and processes that promote collaboration and development of classroom plans with individualizations for behavior and social emotional supports and address the unique needs of children with identified special education disabilities. Family partnerships and advocacy strategies as the children transition into Kindergarten will also be addressed. Participants will leave with a conceptual framework, best practice tools and strategies and successful family advocacy and transition ideas.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

A Literature Review of Studies Involving Paraprofessional-Implemented Systematic Instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this review was to summarize single-case intervention studies involving paraprofessional-implemented systematic instruction. Studies were synthesized to summarize participant and setting characteristics, intervention characteristics, and the quality of the studies. Intervention effect across study participants was calculated and moderator analyses were conducted to determine whether specific study characteristics influenced intervention outcomes. Implications for practice, limitations, and areas for future research will be addressed.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

A Regular Kindergarten Teachers' Difficulties & Support Needs in Teaching Children's Problem Behaviors
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study is to investigate regular kindergarten teachers' difficulties and support needs on their children's problem behaviors. For this purpose, five regular kindergarten teachers in Kyoungki Providence were participated, and one-to-one in depth interview with semi-structured questionnaire was used in this study. Collected interview data were analysed by qualitative methods by coding constant comparative method. Results of this study are as follows. First, types of children's problem behaviors that teachers perceive in the classrooms included inappropriate behaviors to age, harmful behaviors to other people, and involuntary behaviors; children's problem behaviors that teachers usually experience were aggressive behaviors, use of harsh language, difficulties of basic daily living skills, disruptive behaviors during the class, inappropriate social skills, leaving the classroom inappropriately, and inattentive behaviors. Second, difficulties in teaching children's problem behaviors were maladaptation in early school days, relations with parents, management of classrooms, and instruction of peers caused by problem behaviors; instruction for problem behaviors included communication with peer teachers, collaboration with families, use of various instruction (such as token economy, reenforcement, praise, and discipline), guides of administrators and help of peers, help from related books, and professional's advice. Third, parent education and unbiased education, teacher education, support of parateachers or paraprofessionals, individualized education, and linkage were asked for effective instruction of problem behaviors. The results of this study have importance in that regular kindergarten teachers can provide effective ways when they intervene problem behaviors in the classrooms.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

About Poster Presentations
Poster Presentations capture information about a particular topic in the form of printed text and graphics. Poster presentations are displayed on 36" x 48" boards on easels. Poster presentations are shared during a two-hour period in a large room with other poster presentations.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Affect of the ADA on Sports, Workplace, and Education
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation focuses on the affect that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has on sports, workplace, and education. The project highlights how the ADA has helped contribute to many successes, but also shows the many struggles that individuals with disabilities still face in the fields of sports, work, and school.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

An Analysis of Parent/Guardian Components of Sex Ed Curriculums for Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Sexuality is a tough topic to address with all adolescents, but can be even more challenging with adolescents who also have an intellectual disability. When discussing barriers to teaching sex education to individuals with intellectual disabilities, service providers mention lack of time and lack of training, but also underscore the impact that the family members culture, beliefs, and involvement have on the process (Murphy et al., 2015). Family members are a very important resource when discussing sexuality, and one that is often overlooked or ignored. The focus tends to be more on instructional content (Eastgate et al., 2012), rather than the impact of who is delivering the information. A literature and curriculum review will be presented to explores parent and guardian involvement in sex education teaching and within sex education curricula. The review focuses ion three key features: parents' perceived level of involvement, how sex education curricula involves parents (e.g. handouts or homework to be done at home), and the perceived role parents play in teaching sex education. Research gaps in these areas will be discussed. Additionally, the impact that this knowledge has on curricula implementation, and next steps for further understanding of family member involvement in the teaching of sex education to adolescents with intellectual disabilities will also be discussed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Attitudes, Knowledge, and Utilization of Assistive Technology for Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Conversations with special education teacher candidates, cooperating teachers, and families identified the current attitudes, use, and knowledge of assistive technology devices for students with severe disabilities. All students were served in self-contained programs, however, the possibilities of more inclusive experiences with appropriate assistive technology devices were discussed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Better Workforce Means Better Outcomes: Supporting Employment Consultants
Limited Capacity seats available

Given the discrepancies between the desires of people with IDD regarding employment and the reality, it is essential to bolster the work employment consultants do on a daily basis. The role of employment consultants requires research and attention to practice. The ThinkWork project, at the Institute for Community Inclusion, continues to explore the role and activities of employment consultants. Current projects have focused on both qualitative and quantitative input from employment consultants, which has informed the development of a comprehensive model of employment supports for job seekers with IDD.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Brain-Computer Interface Technology: Communication Usability for People with Autism and Cerebral Palsy
Limited Capacity seats available

Augmentative and alternative communication (ACC) enables individuals to access communication, leading to more equitable opportunities and inclusion in schools and communities. This research study examines the usability of an emerging assistive technology, a brain-computer interface (BCI), for the purpose of communication among people with cerebral palsy (CP) and autism. BCIs are systems that “interpret brain activity directly, enabling communication and control by individuals with minimal or no reliable motor function” (Peters, et. al, 2015, p. 1). BCIs rely on brain activity to interact with a computer, rather than volitional motor control (Fried-Oken, Mooney, Peters, & Oken, 2015). Therefore, BCIs have the potential to serve as an ACC for people with complex communication challenges and motor difficulties. This presentation aligns with the 2017 conference theme by focusing on ACC as a method of inclusion for people with complex communication support needs. The research question guiding this study is: To what extent can individuals with varying levels of functional speech use the BCI to achieve AAC competencies? This study employed a single-subject experimental design to study "behavior change an individual exhibits as a result of some treatment" (Gay, Mills, & Airasian, 2012, p. 294). Ten participants (five with CP and five with autism) participated in a series of up to 14 sessions to learn to use a BCI called Think to Speak. Data collection with six participants is complete, one participant is currently underway, and three participants are scheduled in the summer. Preliminary data suggest that participants are able to learn to operate the BCI to generate a one-word response within the limited number of sessions, but not able to reliably generate appropriate responses between two or more different words. Results will discuss limitations to the BCI, as well as recommendations for future practice and research.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Character Strengths as a Facilitator of Successful Employment Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

Positive psychology -- the study, development, and application of activities to enhance positive emotions, psychological well-being, and optimal functioning - offers new insight toward understanding human behavior and aligning positive psychology theories and interventions to foster behavior change. Character strengths is one such theory. Character strengths offer a framework for understanding who we are at our core and how to leverage those strengths to improve outcomes in multiple areas of one's life. This presentation will review three ways character strengths can be facilitators of employment outcomes: 1) Build job seeker hope and self-efficacy through a deeper understanding of who the jobseeker is at their core. 2) Identify tangible strengths the jobseeker brings to a new job along with language to share those strengths in an interview. 3) Offer insight into which strengths the jobseeker is likely to rely on once they are on the job and ways in which the jobseeker, the job coach and other supports can explore using character strengths to be successful during the job search and on the job.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Community Perspectives: Advancing Post-Secondary Education for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) share the same post-school goals as their peers without disabilities to attend college, secure employment, and contribute to their community. Although legislation, policy initiatives, and improved transition service delivery have begun equipping students to achieve these goals, the transition outcomes for many students still fall short of their expectations. Data show that only 27% of youth with intellectual disability attend any type of post-secondary education program within two years of graduation (Newman et al., 2011). Students enrolled in these programs experience more inclusion in their communities and higher levels of employment. Graduates are 26% more likely to exit a vocational rehabilitation program with employment, and earn a 73% higher weekly income. Moreover, after participating in post-secondary education programs, youth report increased satisfaction across several domains including personal relationships, self-determination, and social inclusion (Migliore, Butterworth, & Hart, 2009). New approaches are needed to identify ways school systems, parents, youth with disabilities, and local campuses might work together to develop new and high-quality options for post-secondary education in their communities. One promising approach to facilitate these collaborations is community conversations (Carter et al., 2009). Community conversations use the World Café model (Brown & Isaacs, 2005) to bring diverse stakeholders together to address barriers facing their community. Attendees generate innovative, solutions-focused ideas over series of small and large-group conversations, and build relationships to support sustainable action after the event. This presentation focuses on “community conversations” as a practical and asset-based approach to support the development of post-secondary education programs. As part of our Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID) grant, we conducted a mixed methods study to learn how three geographically and economically diverse communities within one state might implement community conversations to launch efforts to develop new higher education options for local youth with IDD. Through this study we sought to understand: (a) effective strategies planning teams used to engage with local campuses; (b) attendee perspectives on what an inclusive program might look like on their campus; (c) attendee perceptions of the people, resources, or supports that would be critical for success, and (d) how planning teams used the ideas generated at their events to spur future action. We will share our findings from these three community conversation events as well as strategies that any stakeholder (including families, service providers, post-secondary educators, and people with disabilities) might use to begin conversations about higher education for youth with IDD in their community. References Brown, J. Isaacs, D. (2005). The World Café: Shaping our Futures Through Conversations that Matter. Barrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc: San Francisco. Carter, E. W., Owens, L., Swedeen, B., Trainor, A. A., Thompson, C., Ditchman, N., & Cole, O. (2009). Conversations that matter: Engaging communities to expand employment opportunities for youth with disabilities. Teaching Exceptional Children, 41, 38-46. Migliore, A., Butterworth, J., & Hart, D. (2009). Postsecondary education and employment outcomes for youth with intellectual disabilities. Think College. Newman, L., Wagner, M., Knokey, A.-M., Marder, C., Nagle, K., Shaver, D., Wei, X., with Cameto, R., Contreras, E., Ferguson, K., Greene, S., and Schwarting, M. (2011). The Post-High School Outcomes of Young Adults With Disabilities up to 8 Years After High School. A Report From the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) (NCSER 2011-3005). Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Comprehensive Reading Instruction: Evidence-based Practices to Support Literacy and Language in the Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will share a review of research on comprehensive reading instruction with students with significant disabilities. Findings will address intervention components, instructional methods, and outcomes. Recommendations for use of evidence-based literacy practices in the classroom will be discussed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Cultural Responsive Person-Centered Transition Planning to Promote the Involvement of Hispanic Families
Limited Capacity seats available

This poster presentation is based on a review of the literature on culturally and linguistically responsive person-centered transition planning to promote the involvement of Hispanic families. This presentation will address the following: (a) definition of terms, (b) significance and need for, (c) recommended strategies for, and (d) how this approach can promote positive post-school outcomes. This poster presentation aligns with the TASH theme “Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion” because culturally responsive person-centered transition planning is a promising practice to promote the resiliency of individuals with severe disabilities and their families. As well as, positive post-school outcomes (e.g., supported employment and independent living in inclusive setting) in ways that are consistent with the needs and values of Hispanic individuals and their families. The lead presenter is a family member of a Hispanic individual with severe disabilities and is passionate about equitable access to quality transition planning for this population.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Differentiated Instruction to Promote Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion for All Learners
Limited Capacity seats available

This session addresses the topic of inclusion with particular focus on how pre-service teachers can differentiate instruction to maximize equity, opportunity, and inclusion for all learners. Pre-service teachers conduct interviews with teachers in the field to determine how the teacher addresses individual learning differences, including individual student diversity (academic, cultural, and linguistic), areas of interests, and learning styles.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Effects of AAC Intervention for Children with Disabilities at Perlocutionary Language Stage
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an AAC intervention for children with severe and multiple disabilities at the perlocutionary stage. This study is relation to possibilities of AAC intervention for changing of communication stage of children at the perlocutionary stage. The participants of this study were three children using non-symbolic expression modes at the perlocutionary stage. The study design was a multiple prove baseline design across subjects. The intervention program was consisted in most-to least prompt system and play activities using sense of touch, auditory sense and kinesthetic sense. Clinical Implications will be discussed.

Speakers
KH

Kyung-Im Han

Professor, Changwon National University
Kyung-Im Han is a professor in the Department of Special Education, Changwon National University, South Korea. Her research interest is on physical disabilities, augmentative and alternative communication, grounded theory, subjective study and teaching strategies for students wit... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Effects of Positive Behavior Support for Class-Related Behaviors of Children with Cerebral Palsy
Limited Capacity seats available

Research findings of a empirical study will be presented in this session. This study investigated the effects of positive behavior support for class-related behaviors of children with cerebral palsy who had problem behaviors. Three kindergarten children with cerebral palsy participated in the study. A multiple baseline across subjects design were used to examine a functional relation between mediating strategy and class-related behaviors. Results of the study indicated that positive behavior support was effective in increasing attention concentation and instruction compliance of children with cerebral palsy and maintaining the increased behaviors. In addition, positive behavior support was effective in increasing on-task and peer collaboration behaviors. Also, limitations and suggestions for future research will be discussed.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Employment Skills in Motion: The Use of Video-Based Instruction to Promote Employment-Related Social Behaviors for High School Students with Severe Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation summarizes the effects of video-based instruction on the individualized employment-related social behaviors of five high school students with intellectual disability. For all students, the intervention increased target behaviors and sustained task engagement. Attendees will gain valuable information regarding social skills development and employment preparation within secondary schools.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Engaging Students with Disabilities through Robotics
Limited Capacity seats available

The author discusses the importance of engaging students with disabilities in informal STEM activities. The presentation will provide information about IDEA and IEPs as they relate to extracurricular activities. The author will present current research along with her personal experiences of coaching a team of students with autism to compete in a robotics competitions. Lastly, resources on how to start or join a robotics team will be provided.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Evaluating Use of Skip Counting Number Lines and Dot Notation Math to Teach Multiplication to Students with ID
Limited Capacity seats available

Dot-notation math began as a strategy that used fixed reference points on numbers to facilitate counting and was later applied to addition, subtraction, money concepts and multiplication. Dot-notation is a strategy used by some to teach mathematical skills to students with disabilities. While studies have investigated effectiveness with addition and subtraction, experimental studies examining the effectiveness of dot-notation math to teach multiplication to students with disabilities have not been conducted. The importance of using effective evidence-based instructional strategies is crucial for learners with disabilities. Despite lack of applicable research support, dot-notation math is often used in school districts. This study was designed to extend the limited research on dot-notation math and to examine it's effectiveness in teaching multiplication skills. An ABABC design was used to examine the efficacy of dot-notation math to teach multiplication to four 7th and 8th grade middle school students with intellectual disabilities. Skip-counting skills are a prerequisite for dot notation multiplication and students were assessed and taught to skip-count using numberlines in a prebaseline condition. Subsequently, three conditions were implemented: baseline (A), intervention using skip-counting numberlines (B), and intervention teaching use of dot-notation math to solve single-digit multiplication problems (C). Intervention condition C was comprised of direct instruction, modeling use of dot-notation, and using least-to-most prompting to teach single-digit multiplication. Additionally, procedural and inter-rater reliability and social validity data were collected. Visual analysis was used to evaluate student performance during each condition and demonstrated that use of skip-counting numberlines were effective. However, student interviews indicated that students did not understand the concept of multiplication when using only numberlines. The addition of intervention condition C teaching dot-notation increased multiplication skills and student verbal behavior explaining multiplication concepts. Percent of nonoverlapping data provided a measure of effect size, indicating the effectiveness of skip-counting numberlines and dot-notation. It is important to note that in addition to being identified with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities, students were also identified with autism, ADHD, and other health impairments. One student was an English Language Learner. Students represented social economic status of low and middle-income families with two students on free/reduced lunch status. Students were ethnically diverse as well representing Hispanic/Latino, Asian, White and Native American groups of people. The study included two males and two females. This degree of diversity is important in that it helps to indicate the applicability of the procedures for a diverse group of students.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Expanding Boundaries and Erasing Boarders: Including Rural Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

How are rural communities working to provide inclusive social and educational experiences for students with significant disabilities? Amidst the problems rural schools may face, they have characteristics that could have the potential to promote inclusive schools and more equitable opportunities for students with significant disabilities. It may be perceived of rural communities that there is not a wide-range of diversity, but scholars have reflected on this myth claiming that may not be entirely true of rural schools and in fact, they may have similar amounts of diverse differences as urban communities. By reflecting and examining the high disability and poverty rates in rural areas, schools will be better able to create an inclusive school environment for all students. A presentation of current literature will aim to examine the barriers which may exist for rural schools to provide inclusive education services for their students with significant disabilities. This study attempts to develop conclusions of the barriers rural schools may be facing when it comes to creating inclusive special education services for students with significant disabilities in rural areas.

Speakers
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

Special Education Doctoral Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

How to Make Teacher Created Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Academics
Limited Capacity seats available

Providing high-quality special education services in rural settings has a variety of challenges such as geographic isolation and a lack of resources. One particularly challenging aspect of rural special education is a lack of highly trained personnel, especially when providing general curriculum access for students with autism. Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) is one way to provide high-quality specialized instruction that does not require the attention of another teacher nor a paraprofessional while still possessing the ability to implement research-based specially designed instruction with fidelity. These aspects make CAI a viable instructional strategy within inclusive settings that addresses frequent barriers for inclusion in the rural South. The purpose of this poster is to provide teachers with step-by-step instructions for how to create their own CAI programs that can be customized to meet their student's individual needs. The poster also provides specific examples and discusses considerations for teachers when creating their own CAI programs.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

I.B.-long; Enhancing Meaningful Participation of Middle Grade Students with Disabilities in International Baccalaureate Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

The mission of International Baccalaureate programs within schools strives to develop student understanding of global citizenship traits. The Learner Profile aligned to these programs embraces community engagement through appreciation of culture, diversity, and respect for the self and others. With the notions of equity and inclusion underlying the very core of International-Baccalaureate design, it is unfortunate that students with disabilities are often the very ones isolated from participation within these programs. By leveraging evidence-based supports within shared academic settings, opportunities for inclusive service learning, and explicit character-strength instruction, stakeholders can ensure that students with disabilities take on meaningful roles within these internationally-focused programs, becoming valuable global citizens beside their peers and friends.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Improving Homework Completion Using Self-Management Strategies
Limited Capacity seats available

This poster describes a single case research study in which we taught a middle school student with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder to use self-management strategies to improve compliance with completing homework tasks. The study took place in the participant's home during the times that the family selected for homework completion. We taught the participant's mother to implement the intervention to increase sustainability. The session fits with the theme of the TASH conference, 'Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," because helping children with disabilities learn strategies to manage their own behavior increases their autonomy and makes it more likely they will be successful in school, community, and employment settings.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Inclusive Education Practices for Adolescents With Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review
Limited Capacity seats available

Effective supplemental aids and services are important to support and maintain the least restrictive environment for students with disabilities based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This review examined inclusive education interventions as the supplemental aids and services for adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). I identified 36 studies that (a) was conducted in USA; (b) included at least one student with ID attending a junior or senior high school; and (c) attempted to demonstrate the effects of inclusive education practices. Based on these studies, I classified the practices as six types including embedded instructions, self-management instructions, peer support arrangements, inquiry lessons, cooperative learning, and other peer-mediated instructions. Then, I discussed (a) participants' characteristics, (b) inclusive contexts (e.g., class subjects), (c) interventions procedures and outcomes, (d) intervention agents, and (e) the agent's training and/or qualification. I also discussed some variations of intervention procedures that different studies used for the same type of the practices.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Involvement and Participation of Students with Severe Disabilities in SWPBS
Limited Capacity seats available

With more schools implementing schoolwide positive behavior support (SWPBS) and achieving valued student outcomes associated with these efforts, the inclusion of students with extensive support needs must be considered. These students remain programmatically and physically separated from general education instruction and activities, suggesting their limited involvement in SWPBS. In this study, a survey of school-based SWPBS coaches was completed to assess the involvement of students with extensive support needs in a single state. Results suggest that students with ESN are involved in the incentive-based components of their school's SWPBS plan; however, there were differences among respondents in the reported existence of behavior plans and crisis intervention plans. Implications and recommendations for these findings are provided.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Involving Parents and Siblings: A Family Systems Approach to Increasing Communication Skills
Limited Capacity seats available

One common challenge for many families of children with disabilities is communication. In many cases the children may have complex communication needs (CCN), which result in significant delays in communication (APA, 2013; National Research Council, 2001). These communicative deficits may lead to impaired social functioning and interaction, and limited verbal skills for the child (Raghavendra, Virgo, Olsson, Connell, & Lane, 2011). Communication challenges may also cause family members, especially parents and siblings, to feel disconnected from the child with CCN. Furthermore, a lack of ability to effectively communicate, and understand communication, can add additional stress family members already feel when raising a child with a disability (Bailey, Parette, Stoner, Angell, & Carroll, 2006; van Ijzendoorn et al., 2007; Marshall & Goldbart, 2008). Family member support, particularly parents and siblings, is especially crucial in helping a child develop effective communication skills (Huttenlocher, Waterfall, Vasilyeva, Vevea, & Hedges, 2010; Siller & Sigman, 2002). This conference presentation will aim to summarize the findings of four research projects in which two family-centered strategies were used to increase the communication of a child with a disability. The first strategy is the POWR parent strategy, focused on helping parents learn how to increase their child's communication skills while playing or doing a fun activity. This strategy was examined across two multiple probe single-subject design studies, one with parents of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and another with parents of children with CCN and developmental disabilities. The second strategy is an adaptation of the POWR strategy created for siblings of a child with a disability. This strategy is titled Plan, Talk, Wait, Respond. This strategy was examine across two studies: one using a multiple probe single-subject design with siblings of a child with CCN, and a case study with increased emphasis on certain aspects of the strategy. In both strategies the family members are taught four main steps: 1) Plan a fun activity that fits the child's interested and culture ; 2) Offer opportunities for communication/talk with the child; 3) Wait for the child's response; and 4) Respond to the child each time they communicate to reward the social interaction. Multiple probe single-subject designs were used to study the impact and effectiveness of the trainings with both parents and siblings across families with young children with different disabilities and CCN. Study participants represented a diverse sample of families. Findings from the studies indicate that the training for both parents and siblings positively impacted child communication behaviors during play activities. General results from the studies will be presented. In addition to a summary of the results, implications for training multiple members of the child's household will be discussed. The usefulness and potential benefits of training multiple communication partners in a more naturalistic setting will be presented. It is important to help children with disabilities and CCN learn the necessary skills to communicate in the world around them. Communication is a social issue, and can have lasting effects. Parents and siblings are the individuals who are in the best position to help these children, but are often under-utilized. These are the individuals who are around the child every day, and have the most interactions and communications with them. Educating and coaching family members on how to implement the evidence-based POWR and Plan, Talk, Wait, Respond communication strategies can potentially have very long and lasting impacts on children with communication delays. Increasing the child's communication, and teaching those most connected to them to do so, is best-practice and will increase their ability to function in society as they continue to age.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Key Components When Training Paraeducators to Ensure Student Success
Limited Capacity seats available

According to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, a primary aim of special education services is to meet the diverse needs of students with disabilities; yet, there is a wide gap between research and practice in special education. Practitioners who are familiar with evidence-based practices may not implement them accurately nor will they train their staff how to implement them. Simply acquainting practitioners with lists of evidence-based practices does not ensure accurate and effective implementation. Research has demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral skills training (BST) as an instructional method with learners with significant disabilities. Given the current high-stakes climate of teacher accountability in education and the achievement gap between students with disabilities and their peers without disabilities, effective strategies are needed to equip special education teachers with skillful repertoires of evidence-based practices (EBPs). As paraeducators are taking on more critical roles among students with disabilities in the classroom, the availability of training and professional development opportunities for these professionals continues to be lacking. The purpose of our presentation is to demonstrate to teachers and other professionals a research-based strategy when taking dense information from professional development trainings and translates that to a simple and brief training for paraeducators. This will include several components including creating a task analysis (i.e., checklist) of critical components, modeling, role-play, and ongoing feedback/coaching. Researchers will demonstrate to the audience the key steps to implementing staff training in the classroom and will also provide the audience with an opportunity to practice this skill.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Korean Mothers of Children with Disabilities and their Experiences in the U.S.
Limited Capacity seats available

This study is to examine the extent to which Korean individuals with disabilities and their parents' attitudes and perceptions of disability have an impact on the children's transition to adulthood (including post-secondary education, employment, and independent living). It is a qualitative case study that will examine the current practices of transition for students with disabilities by listening to stories told by the participants and to gain a pragmatic understanding of the community-based transition service needs and give voices to those who may be disenfranchised or marginalized by society. Four families of individuals with disabilities will be interviewed for the case study. Data collection includes, interview, document analysis, and field observation.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

My Voice. My Participation. My Board: Leadership Training for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

With the growing power of the self-advocacy movement, community organizations are increasingly recognizing the importance and value of including individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) as full members of their governance boards and advisory councils. Many individuals with IDD have not had opportunities and experiences to prepare them for these roles. This presentation will focus on a newly developed program to address this need--My Voice. My Participation. My Board. The purpose of this presentation is to inform conference attendees about the impact of My Voice. My Participation. My Board (MVMPMB) training program on individuals with IDD and decision making boards and advisory councils. MVMPMB is a leadership training program for individuals with IDD who are interested in gaining specific skills to be more effective board of director and advisory council members.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Peer Supports: Let's Make it Happen!
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," by providing knowledge necessary to utilize peers as a support in order to successfully include students with significant disabilities in general education classrooms. Peer support can foster opportunities for students with disabilities to be included and engaged in the same activities as their peers. This session explains in detail the step-by-step process of how to set up a peer tutoring system within a school site. During this interactive workshop, five training sessions developed for peer tutors will be explained and essential roles and responsibilities of peer tutors will be discussed. Research conducted by the presenter on peer tutoring will also be shared. This session prepares participants with the tools and resources they need to implement a peer tutoring system at the middle and high school levels, providing students a right to a free and appropriate public education with the supports necessary to be successful.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Seeking Best Ways to Document Whether and How Teacher Candidates Support Students Rising
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this poster presentation is to present findings from an interview study that explored what recent graduates and current teacher mentors associated with two inclusive teacher preparation programs would consider to be positive student outcomes as well as any associated positive mentor outcomes that result from teacher candidate participation in prek-12 classrooms -- in particular, outcomes beyond required state assessments that would indicate that students (with and without disabilities) in inclusive settings did "still rise."

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Seeking Employment in the Digital Age: Student Directed Websites
Limited Capacity seats available

As educators and professionals, we have a responsibility to create innovative solutions for students to communicate their accomplishments in a professional and contemporary approach to provide access to competitive and integrated employment. In this breakout session, we will explore how to create a dynamic website allowing students to document their journey through high school, employment and beyond. We will discuss the components, organization, and process of building an website portfolio to include: online resume, blog, video, file storage, social media, photos, etc. Students can utilize this tool as a way to communicate their accomplishments, strengths, support needs, and experiences. A self advocate will co-facilitate this presentation and share his personal experience with using his website to reinstate his rights.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Self-determination in Health Care at School
Limited Capacity seats available

Data presented in this research presentation is part of a larger multiple case study that examined beliefs about and the involvement of students with intellectual disabilities and complex health care needs in their specialized health care at school. Nine cases were studied that included the following participants: focus students with intellectual disabilities and complex health care needs and their respective parents, special education teachers, school nurses, and 1:1 nurses or paraprofessionals. This research presentation is focused on findings specific to self-determination in health care at school. These findings were (a) students can realize self-determination in their health care through partial participation in their specialized health care procedures, self-reporting health issues, and making choices (b) school personnel and parents valued student self-determination in health care but were unsure how to teach and/or support self-determination in students with the most complex support needs; (c) students who demonstrated self-determination in their heath care were perceived and observed to safeguard their own health, exhibit self-confidence in their health care, and positive social-emotional adjustment to their health care needs; and (d) self-determination in health care at school was perceived to be associated with improved quality of life and adult outcomes for students, as well as decreased caregiver responsibilities and stress reported by parents. This presentation connects with the TASH theme because self-determination in health care is essential to resiliency in this population, who generally requires continuous and intensive direct health supports and medical technologies. Self-determination in health care, including self-care and health advocacy, enables individuals with disabilities to realize their basic human rights to exercise control over their bodies, be independent, and experience quality of life across their lifespan in inclusive settings.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Service Dogs for 100 Please
Limited Capacity seats available

The term "service dog" is often used as a generic label including service dogs for people with disabilities, emotional support dogs, psychiatric service dogs, seizure or diabetic alert dogs and therapy dogs. A service dog is defined under ADA as a dog trained to perform a task for a person with a disability that he or she could not perform for themselves and that makes the disability less severe, serious, or painful. Service dogs are granted specific access and legal rights under ADA. Other types of specially trained dogs included under the generic "service dog" category may or may not be entitled to ADA protection and access depending on the type of duties they perform and the nature of their training. Additionally, the abuse of "service dog" designation from online sources has further complicated the issue, especially for individuals with invisible disabilities. This confusion and abuse regarding “service dog” status has caused people with disabilities to be denied access and support, while individuals without disabilities can take advantage of service dog status to gain access for untrained dogs. This situation has resulted in denial of rights for people with disabilities, a potential misperception of the purpose of service dogs, and the potential for unsafe situations for both dogs and people when they encounter untrained "service dogs" in public situations who are not properly trained to handle the complexities of community access. The purpose of this presentation is to provide information on the ADA definition of service dogs and define the purpose, training, and legal access granted to other types of assistance dogs often included in the "Service Dog" category.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Steps that Lead to a Degree
Limited Capacity seats available

As a self-advocate who is an undergraduate student enrolled at Georgia State University, I would like to share proper avenues and steps that one with an IEP can master to get into college and earn a degree.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Strategies for Success for Dually Classified Students
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will include a discussion and visual representation of research based strategies that benefit individuals who are both diagnosed with severe developmental disabilities and are English Language Learners (ELLs).

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Comparison of the Characteristics between the Employed and the Unemployed...
Limited Capacity seats available

Full Presentation Title: The Comparison of the Characteristics between the Employed and the Unemployed among the High School Graduates with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in South Korea
The purpose of the present study is to compare the characteristics between the employed and the unemployed among high school leavers with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities using a nationally representative data set. Data for this study were extracted from the 8th Panel Survey of Employment for the Disabled raw data from Korea Employment Agency for the Disabled in 2015. The target sample number for this study was 100. Specifically, there were 76 people with intellectual disabilities and 24 people with developmental disabilities in the data set. This study found that the employed were more likely to be male, had milder disabilities, graduated from colleges, and did not receive social security beneficiaries, had better computer skills and social skills, did not need help for daily activities, and received vocational services and vocational training than the unemployed. Also, this study revealed that the people who were employed were more satisfied about life satisfaction as well as had higher self-esteem than those who were unemployed among high school leavers with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Effect of Enhanced Milieu Communication Intervention…
Limited Capacity seats available

Full Presentation Title: The Effect of Enhanced Milieu Communication Intervention on the Functional Communication Behaviors for a Young Child with a Developmental Delay
This study intented to examine the effect of enhanced milieu communication intervention on the functional communication behaviors for a young child with special needs. A four year old child diagnosed with developmental delay was selected as subject, a multiple baseline design across settings was also used for this study. The results of this study showed that enhanced milieu communication intervention increased the request (request for information, behavior, objects, & permission), & reaction (reaction to question, request, repetition, & ritual response) on functional communication behaviors for a young child with developmental delay.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The effects of Positive Behavior Support on Yelling Behaviors and Social Interaction Behaviors of Toddler with Developmental Delay
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of positive behavior support on yelling behaviors and social interaction behaviors of toddler with developmental delay. The subject of this study was a 31months toddler with developmental delay. The individualized PBS consisted of intervention of antecedents & setting events, alternative behavior instruction, and consequences . The ABAB reversial design was utilized as a research design. The frequency of behaviors were measured using event recording. The results of this study were as follows: First, the positive behavior intervention reduced the frequency of yelling behaviors. Secondly, the positive behavior intervention increased the frequency of social interaction behaviors. In conclusion, the individualized positive behavior intervention reduced the frequency of yelling behaviors and increased the frequency of social interaction behaviors. Therefore, the overall quality of life of toddler with developmental delay has shown to be improved.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Life Experience of Adults who have a Sibling with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This poster will present findings of a study designed to investigate the experience of adults who have a sibling with disabilities in Korea. This study used a qualitative, grounded theory approach with eight participants. Individual semi-structured in-depth interviews and audio-recorded with all participants were conducted. Through the coding process, we constructed a paradigm model on the life of adults who have sibling with disabilities in Korea. The results of this study pointed to the importance of context and intervening conditions as well as the provision to support siblings who have people with dsabilities in Korea.

Speakers
KH

Kyung-Im Han

Professor, Changwon National University
Kyung-Im Han is a professor in the Department of Special Education, Changwon National University, South Korea. Her research interest is on physical disabilities, augmentative and alternative communication, grounded theory, subjective study and teaching strategies for students wit... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Use of Functional Communication Training for Elementary Aged Children in Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate the use of Functional Communication Training (FCT) in the educational setting. Specifically, this review sought to assess how FCT is utilized in the elementary education setting to address challenging behavior for students ages 5-12 who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The goal of this review was to examine the existing base of literature to describe: (a) who is implementing FCT, (b) for what types of problem behaviors, (c) the language targets (e.g., one-word mands), (d) which communication systems are being utilized, and (e) the methods used to teach the language targets. To be included in this review, studies had to (a) have been published in a peer-reviewed journal before July 2016, (b) be available in English, (c) used FCT for intervention or as part of an intervention package, (d) have conducted the study in an elementary education setting, (e) used FCT to address challenging behavior, and (f) include participants between the ages of 5-12 who had either a diagnosis or educational eligibility of ASD. Results showed that FCT is most commonly used in self-contained special education classrooms or a segregated setting. Additionally, the primary interventionists identified in the research were people other than the teacher. The results indicate a need for increased research exploring the use of FCT as a behavioral intervention within integrated school settings by educational professionals to increase the social validity of FCT. The results of this literature review support the theme of this year’s TASH conference by demonstrating the need for more research into behavioral intervention methods that allow for greater inclusion and participating within the educational setting.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using an Apple Watch to Increase Daily Living Skills for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will discuss the effects of using wearable technology (Apple Watches) combined with an evidence-based practice (video-prompting) on independent daily living skill acquisition for students with autism spectrum disorders. The students in this project independently navigated through video prompts to watch each step of the task. This presentation will also provide an overview of video-prompting methods as well as best practices in video-prompt development. Access to this technology supports the inclusion of students with disabilities in schools and communities, increases independence, and reduces the need for socially stigmatizing external supports.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Grade Aligned Science to Students with ASD
Limited Capacity seats available

This study used a multiple probe across participants design to investigate the effects of a computer-assisted instructional package on the acquisition of science content for middle school students with autism. Poster will include: literature review, discussion of methods, visual presentation of results, implications for practice, and suggestions for future research. This presentation aligns with the conference theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" as it demonstrates how computer-assisted instruction can be used to provide high-quality, grade-aligned academic instruction within inclusive settings.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using Long Road Home Activities to Encourage States to Comply with Olmstead
Limited Capacity seats available

It has been 18 years since the U.S. Supreme Court Olmstead decision (Olmstead), in which people with disabilities were expressly given the right to live in and receive services in the community. Today, people with disabilities are still having to struggle for equal opportunities to be included in the community compared to people without disabilities. The Long Road Home initiative was formed to highlight the meaning and importance of the Olmstead decision. Its goal is to raise awareness about the rights of people with disabilities by holding multiple events both in Georgia and across the country on the anniversary of Olmstead, June 22. All Long Road Home events incorporate at least two elements: (1) The sharing of stories, known as "I am Olmstead" Freedom stories, which are told by and about people who have transitioned out of nursing facilities and institutions and are now living successfully and happily in their communities; and (2) The availability of educational materials on voting as well as voter registration forms to assist people to exercise their basic citizenship right to vote.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using Participation Plans to Teach Social Studies Content in Inclusive Secondary Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this project was to teach social studies content to high school students with intellectual and developmental disabilities in general education (inclusive) settings. Limited research focused on teaching social studies content to students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as limited interventions in inclusive settings for this population have been completed; as such, this project is needed to inform practitioners and researchers alike. A single-case, multiple baseline across prioritized skill categories (knowledge of facts, vocabulary, and comprehension) and participants was employed. Data analysis included visual inspection of trend, level, and variability changes across phases as well as measures of Percent of All Non-Overlapping Data. Findings from this project will significantly inform inclusive instructional methods for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Why Inclusive Education? Creating an Inclusive Culture
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion", by developing a deep understanding of why inclusive education is important and how to create an inclusive school culture for all students, including students with significant disabilities. With a focus on students with complex needs, this interactive workshop teaches the importance of equity and opportunity while discussing five essential school pillars that are the foundation for creating an inclusive mindset for both students, families, and staff. The triangle of support, consisting of personal supports, instructional and assistive technology, and curricular accommodations and modifications will be explained in detail. Students have the right to a sense of belonging in their school environments and this session prepares participants to draft their own school-wide philosophy and pillars that embrace a free and appropriate education for all.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Working Together: Cross-Cultural Collaboration between Mothers and Special Educators
Limited Capacity seats available

Family/educator collaboration is at the heart of effective special education service delivery. This study examines the nature of family/educator interactions in the context of three Somali-American boys with autism. The mothers of the three boys represent a range of socioeconomic, marital, and educational backgrounds, much like the three teachers who also have varying levels of education and experiences with autism. Serial semi-structured interviews were used to gauge experiences and information from three different cases. A theme analysis revealed five central themes: (1) social status and level of parental education/knowledge of autism affects resource acquisition (2) teacher qualifications and background/experience can influence their role as a professional, (3) parents and professionals uniting for a common reason (4) translating families’ goals and hopes into educational planning (5) importance of advocacy. Implications for practice will also be discussed (e.g., using different modes of communication [in-person meetings, phone calls, daily communication logs, etc.] that are comfortable to both the family and educator; opportunities for families to be involved in schools [dances, events, etc.])


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

6:30pm

Reception & Sock Hop Dance
Thursday December 14, 2017 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303
 
Friday, December 15
 

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
The Exhibit Hall will be open during these times.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:00am - 3:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Quiet Room
The quiet room is available for all TASH conference attendees. The room is located on the Lobby level near the concierge desk.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:29am

About TASH Talks
TASH Talks are informal discussions regarding a topic that are not meant to provide answers, but rather evoke creative thinking about an issue (e.g. personal experience, story, point of view). Presentations are chosen at random from the list below.  And, each presenter delivers his/her talk around a particular topic for 8-10 minutes. 
    This year's confirmed TASH Talk presenters are listed in no particular order.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:29am - 10:30am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Access Community
Limited Capacity seats available

Here are the voices of real and personal success stories of community inclusion and opportunities of individuals with complex support needs. We have learned how to create meaningful and long lasting community relationships through trial error, observation, exploration and research. In-depth continued learning encourages opportunities in educating community members and the creation of natural supports; allowing people to experience known and unknown areas of interests that CAN evolve into meaningful connections. From this forum, we would like everyone to be inspired to create true equity and community inclusion for ALL.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Don't Judge This Book by it's Cover
Limited Capacity seats available

My world is filled with many things that are out of my control and by any reasonable standard could be considered devastating. However, both subjectively and objectively, I have a lot to be happy about. This includes communication, advocacy and reciprocal relationships. Using a keyboard or letterboard, I am now able to communicate all day long and this has been life changing. Since presenting at TASH last year, I have been invited to talk with scientists and educators about rethinking autism. I hope this helps to reshape the thinking of those in influecial positions. I also got a chance to publicly tell my sister how much she means to me and that my autism is not her lifelong responsibility.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Individual Stories of iPad Usage: What's Going on in Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

In this study, I sought to understand how iPads were used in classrooms with students with low incidence disabilities. This study utilized a qualitative approach including semi-structured interviews, observations, and document analysis to understand the following question: To what extent (how far & how much) are iPads used in inclusive classrooms to support the needs of students with low incidence disabilities. By examining the stories of four student participants, I was able to shed light on how teachers integrated iPads into a classroom for students with low incidence disabilities. iPad integration is imperative in today's educational society because iPads are increasing in number within the classroom and used for both educational as well as entertainment purposes.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Supported Decision Making: A Family's Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

Supported Decision Making: A Family's Perspective Supported decision making is a time tested, culturally typical, and powerful way of making decisions and governing one's life. However, despite all of the advocacy efforts to ensure that people with disabilities are recognized in the rightful role as a citizens, we still find that when you live with a disability, you are vulnerable to being controlled and having decisions made for and about you i.e., where you will live, where and how you will spend your day, who you can socialize with, etc. One of the clearest examples of the perpetuation of control of people with disabilities is the often routine advice that is given to parents to assume guardianship of or to appoint a guardian for their family member with a disability. This session will look at the concept of supported decision making through the eyes of a family who is committed to respecting the rights of their daughter as a citizen to make decisions and control her life. The potency, benefits, viability, and structure of supported decision making will be discussed. Their daughter's leadership and the family journey to supported decision making will be shared.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

The Power of One: Becoming an Influencer for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

As a sibling of a sister with a disability, I will share my story of growing up as a sister and my sister's perspective of living with a disability. My storytelling piece will capture the challenging questions faced to me, my other siblings, and my sister, and the emerged answers that shed light on the only life we know. The experiences shared will reflect how the power of one individual can evolve oneself and others to be influencers of change for equity, opportunity, and inclusion.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Breakout Sessions (Morning) - Coming Soon!
Breakout Sessions are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 11:45am
TBA

12:00pm

Membership Luncheon & Awards Ceremony
This luncheon is open to TASH members only. Lunch will be provided.

Friday December 15, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
TBA

1:10pm

Breakout Sessions (Afternoon) - Coming Soon!

Breakout Sessions are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 4:10pm
TBA

4:20pm

Closing General Session
More info to come.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Richey

Kimberly Richey

Deputy Assistant Secretary and Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS)
Kimberly M. Richey is the deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary in the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services at the United States Department of Education. In this capacity, she serves as advisor to the U.S. secretary of education on matters r... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 4:20pm - 5:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303