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2017 TASH Conference
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Each year, the TASH Conference brings together a diverse community of stakeholders who gain information, learn about resources, and connect with others across the country to strengthen the disability field. This year’s conference theme, “Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion,” shows the resilience of individuals with disabilities and their families across the lifespan. Conference attendees will celebrate their passion for disability rights, civil rights, and human rights while exploring inclusive communities, schools, and workplaces that support people with disabilities, including those with complex support needs. Return to TASH website.


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Tuesday, December 12
 

12:00pm

TASH Board of Directors Meeting
This meeting is open to TASH Board Members only.

Moderators
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autono... Read More →
avatar for Ralph Edwards

Ralph Edwards

President, TASH

Tuesday December 12, 2017 12:00pm - 6:00pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303
 
Wednesday, December 13
 

7:59am

About Wednesday Workshops
Wednesday Workshops are short-course workshops that are delivered by teams of presenters around a particular topic in a scheduled room for 1.5-3 hours. Workshops allow attendees to dive into popular topics in more depth. Workshops will take place on Wednesday only.

Wednesday December 13, 2017 7:59am - 5:00pm
TBA

8:00am

Employment Track: Opening Remarks
Limited Capacity seats available

Please join us for the Employment Track to learn more about employment for individuals with disabilities! There will be concurrent sessions open to all conference attendees running throughout the day focusing on Employment Policy and Practice. 

Speakers
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autono... Read More →
avatar for Robin Blount

Robin Blount

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 8:30am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Preserving Autonomy: Rethinking Guardianship
Limited Capacity seats available

Setting up guardianship or conserving a person with disabilities is demeaning and conflicts with current best practices. The outcome for the person is devastating and stigmatizing. We must rethink this common, but outdated practice and instead use alternatives and provide the supports, help and accommodations persons need to exercise choice, have the preferences honored and to participate in our communities as equal citizens.

Speakers
avatar for Dohn Hoyle

Dohn Hoyle

Director of Public Policy, The Arc Michigan
Dohn Hoyle is the currently the Director of Public Policy (formerly the Executive Director) of The Arc of Michigan and a long-time advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. A respected leader and innovator in the disability movement, Dohn helped to rewrite the Michigan... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 10:00am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Access for All: Curricular Accommodations and Modifications
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion", by developing a deep understanding of how to provide students with complex needs an equitable education. Equipping participants with curricular adaptation strategies strengthens the disability field and fosters the opportunity for all students to have access to the general education curriculum alongside their peers. Designing and providing curricular accommodations and modifications are essential to effective inclusive educational practices. With a focus on students with significant disabilities and support needs, this hands-on interactive workshop teaches a diverse community of stakeholders how to design curriculum that is accessible to all students. An understanding of universal design for learning and the importance of collaboration will be highlighted. Peer supports and technology supports will also be embedded. Collaboratively, participants will apply strategies in the following seven areas: differentiated content, accessible directions, streamlining the curriculum, individualized lesson objectives, assignment layouts, infusing individual goals, and classroom assessments. In order to ensure all students' needs are met in an inclusive setting, participants will understand the benefits of and learn how to use the following resources: a student profile, academic unit lesson plan, and an infused skills grid. Students have the right to a free and appropriate public education and this workshop will prepare participants with the knowledge and resources to provide all students with an equitable education.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Behavior Change is a Family Affair: Empowering Family Partnerships in PBIS Implementation
Limited Capacity seats available

Participants in this interactive and hands-on workshop will explore best practices for family partnerships in school-wide PBS, create predictable routines and a PBS home matrix as well as develop a strength-based family-friendly positive behavior support plan.

Speakers

Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Community Building for Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

For nearly nine years, a group of ordinary people living across the state of Georgia have been actively learning together how to work for social justice and build opportunities for intentional and reciprocal relationships between people with and without disabilities. Drawing from approaches and philosophies such as Asset Based Community Development, Popular Education, Intersectionality, Person Centered Values, and Visionary Organizing, we have learned much about the conditions that encourage all members of a community to contribute and meaningfully participate in civic life, enhance social connections through collective action, and build more avenues to natural supports and relationships outside of human services. Our approach centers people who live at the intersection of multiple marginalized identities, whether they have a disability and/or they are a person of color, LGBTQ, poor, an immigrant, a refugee, or have experienced homelessness or incarceration. We are finding ways to build solidarity and reciprocity across and among identity lines and are learning to become better allies with others working to overcome the injustice of social exclusion, whatever its cause. This workshop will include an in-depth overview of our work and approach through storytelling and interactive, experiential large and small group activities. Participants will be offered practical ways of how to take these ideas and use them back home.

Speakers
avatar for Caitlin Childs

Caitlin Childs

Community Organizer, Facilitator, Writer and Consultant, Self-Employed


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Partnering With Family Leaders Across Cultures: More Than Just an Invitation and Translation
Limited Capacity seats available

As we all know, the demographic in the United States has been changing rapidly with an increasing number of families whose first language is not English. Navigating systems of care for these families is so daunting that many of these families do not know where to turn. This workshop is a panel from different professionals who live the lives who will share their unique perspectives on how to effectively work with families from culturally diverse backgrounds, to help bridge gaps in communication, cultural belief, disability attitude, social stigma, and increase the participation of parents from diverse backgrounds.

Speakers
avatar for Ralph Edwards

Ralph Edwards

President, TASH
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Susan Yuan

President, The Association for Successful Parenting
I am the mother of a 43-year old man who has Angelman Syndrome and who types to communicate, with me as his primary facilitator. My academic field is Psychology, with emphasis on Family Support. In the past 2 decades, I have been very involved with advancing the rights of parents... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

TASH Doctoral Students and Beginning Special Education Faculty Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

This Wednesday session is meant for you! Come meet each other and nationally-recognized professors and researchers with successful records as college and university faculty who are willing to share their strategies with you.

8:00- 8:30 AM
Establishing a Professional Identity Vicki Knight, Andrea Ruppar, and Virginia Walker

8:30- 9:15 AM
Session A: Developing and Sustaining a Research Agenda Vicki Knight and Fred Spooner
Session B: The Job Search  Jami Pettner-Arrey, Andrea Ruppar, and Amy Toson

9:15-10:00
Session A: Teacher Preparation Stacy Dymond and Donna Lehr
Session B: Promotion and Tenure  Marty Agran and Fred Spooner

10:00-10:45 AM
Grants and External Funding Pam Mims and Mary Morningstar

10:45-11:30 AM
Service and Professional Development Jacki Anderson

11:30 AM-12:15 PM
Publishing  Marty Agran, Susan Copeland, Stacy Dymond, Donna Lehr, and Fred Spooner



Speakers
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments a... Read More →
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois
DL

Donna Lehr

Associate Dean - Academic Affairs, Boston University
I'm long-time TASH member who has focused my efforts on the education of students with complex health care needs and inclusion of students with severe disabilities in general education.
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and tran... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison`
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co... Read More →
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Amy Toson

Assistant Professor, Cardinal Stritch University
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education, Illinois State University
Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Illinois State University. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with low incidence disabilities in Atlanta, Georgia before attending the University of Virginia where she worked on several federally funded grants involving research in the areas of multi-tiered models of positive behavioral interventions and support and teacher preparation in the area of low incidence disabilities. Building upon this work, Dr... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Quiet Room
The quiet room is available for all TASH conference attendees, and is located on the Lobby level just down the hall from the hotel's concierge desk.

Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
L502 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

EFSLMP and PIE: Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for People with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the most important aspects that allow individuals to live the lives they desire is employment. Employment not only gives individuals purpose, but employment also provides them the means to live independent lives. Through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) and the Partnerships in Employment (PIE) programs, the federal government is supporting states as they work to change their policies in order to make competitive integrated employment (CIE) more accessible to more people with disabilities. Learn about the similarities and differences between EFSLMP and PIE, the technical assistance each provides, and the successful strategies states have used to change policy to increase CIE.

Speakers
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Project Manager, Youth Employment Solutions Center / National TASH


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Guided Group Discovery: Successful Employment through Partnerships
Limited Capacity seats available

Guided Group Discovery (GGD) is a set of strategies that can benefit any job seeker who faces barriers to employment. GGD is a universal design approach that is very effective for people with disabilities. It is used in partnership with a number of systems, so that people can receive support through multiple agencies at the same time, as needed. Youth and adults with disabilities, for example, can engage in Guided Group Discovery that is supported by any combination of agencies, including vocational rehabilitation, developmental disabilities, behavioral health, the public workforce system, Centers for Independent Living, community rehabilitation agencies, foster care agencies, homeless services providers, and others. This provides more support for job seekers and enables agencies to leverage each other's resources. LEAD Center staff will discuss the pilot projects it has supported that used Guided Group Discovery in American Job Centers (also known as One-Stop Career Centers) in collaboration with a variety of partners. These strategies are similar to more traditional facilitated Discovery, in that they serve as an alternative assessment tool that identifies the strengths and ideal conditions of employment for job seekers with and without disabilities. GGD assists people in securing and maintaining employment by supporting them in small groups to create their own individual blueprint to guide their job search process. GDD, like other forms of Discovery, serves as the cornerstone for customized employment, which increasingly is being used as a universal design approach by workforce development professionals.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:15am

Seamless Transition: The Potential of WIOA
Limited Capacity seats available

Wouldn't it be ideal if the culmination of K-12 education for youth with disabilities was a job and a clear career path? As youth make the transition from being students to young adults, the ideal would be that they move seamlessly from being a student to an employee, leading to a meaningful job and career. This is indeed the gold standard of transition outcomes. With what we now know, there is no reason not to expect this to be the desired outcome for every student who receives special education services in today's high schools. What really works so that students with disabilities seamlessly transition to adult employment? How can we organize education and vocational rehabilitation services for youth so they leave school with a job? This presentation will discuss findings from research done through TransCens Disability Rehabilitation Research Project and experience in implementing Pre-employment transition services for youth with disabilities.

Speakers

Wednesday December 13, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:15am

The Rural Routes to Employment Project - Lessons Learned
Limited Capacity seats available

In rural areas across the country a lack of employment opportunity is a shared concern. This is not a disability specific issue but is a shared concern for all citizens. Rural areas, however, often offer unique opportunities to expand employment because of the greater sense of community, the inventiveness that comes from a lack of resources and the fact that for most small communities, the concerns of economic development, jobs, and post-school success are shared by all. This presentation will tell the stories of adult providers and transition staff over the course of this five-year Rural Routes to Employment Project: Barriers identified, Practices developed, Economic Development approaches utilized. All which can be easily adopted and become in many instances solutions to the increasing employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:15am

Everyone Communicates: TASH's Call to Action
Limited Capacity seats available

This panel will be comprised of AAC users, researchers, and advocates and will focus on how to move TASH's communication campaign forward. This panel will examine some of the myths and definitions of AAC and AAC users, researchers, and advocates will discuss ways to move TASH forward with some common definitions, goals, and purposes.

This session is part of TASH's "Communication for All" campaign.

Moderators
Speakers
DT

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions



Wednesday December 13, 2017 10:15am - 12:15pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:15am

Supported Decision Making in Action throughout the LifeSpan
Limited Capacity seats available

Supported Decision Making (SDM) is being embraced throughout the country to help people gain and/or maintain control of their life. Used with both children and adults living with disabilities, it is a process whereby people get the assistance they need and want to understand the situations and choices they face, so they can make life decisions for themselves. Implementing this approach requires a change in thinking about how life decisions are made and how people are supported - starting with the acknowledgement that all people need and get help making decisions in the natural course of life - starting as early as possible. This session will look at the emerging trends and practices around supported decision-making (SDM) as an alternative to guardianship and as a strategy for helping people become better decision-makers over their life time. Presenters will share stories of how this has worked to assist children and adults with developmental disabilities retain and regain individual rights and life control from the professional, legal and family perspectives.

Speakers
avatar for Morgan Whitlatch

Morgan Whitlatch

Legal Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
Morgan K. Whitlatch is the Legal Director of the Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, an independent, non-profit advocacy organization that has been advancing the interests of D.C. residents with developmental disabilities since 2002. Morgan has devoted her legal car... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 10:15am - 12:15pm
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

12:45pm

Project FOCUS: From College to Competitive Employment for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

While typical students graduate high school after four years and transition to work and or higher education, these options are historically not available to students with intellectual disabilities. This presentation will describe Project FOCUS (Focusing Opportunities with Community and University Support). The University of Arizona's College of Education in collaboration with local school districts supports this fully inclusive postsecondary transition option for young adults, age 18-22 who have significant intellectual disabilities. Project FOCUS facilitates access and inclusion to the University of Arizona's academic courses, internship experiences, and college life events in order to increase each student's independence, employability, and quality of life. Prior to starting their college experience, each student has a person-centered plan, then receive individualized academic, employment, social, and emotional instruction throughout the two year program. Students are supported by same-aged undergraduate peer mentors who are trained to implement best practices. Project FOCUS is committed to support students and their families build a bridge to gainful employment through partnerships with local businesses and state service agencies, and develop meaningful friendships, greater self-determination, and self-confidence. These experiences, skills, and collaborations gained positively influence and reshape community perceptions of individuals who have significant intellectual disabilities for greater equity for all.

Speakers
avatar for Kirsten Lansey

Kirsten Lansey

Doctoral Student, University of Arizona


Wednesday December 13, 2017 12:45pm - 1:45pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

12:45pm

The ABLE Act and Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

The ABLE Act now allows certain individuals with disabilities the opportunity to save money without jeopardizing their federally funded means tested benefits (such as Medicaid and SSI). Additionally, these funds are to be used for qualified disability related expenses that help the person with a disability increase and/or maintain their health, independence and quality of life (including employment related expenses). This presentation will help the audience better understand the basics components of being an ABLE account owner, as well as how having an ABLE account could help the beneficiary obtain and maintain competitive integrated employment.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 12:45pm - 1:45pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

International Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Details coming soon!

Speakers
avatar for Michael Kendrick

Michael Kendrick

Director, Kendrick Consulting Intl
I have been very involved in person centered approaches that result in enriched lives for the person who is the focus. This interest has led to many associated questions such as values based leadership, defining and achieving quality outcomes, embedding people in valued roles in... Read More →
avatar for Tia Nelis

Tia Nelis

Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of the past chairperson of the National Organization of Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered. She founded and successfully promoted People First of Illinois, where she served as president. Tia, a long-time member of TASH, has received the Burton Blatt Award, awarded by the Illinois TASH chapter, as well as the Elizabeth Boggs award from the... Read More →
avatar for Chernet T. Weldeab

Chernet T. Weldeab

Currently I am working with a position of Adjunct Faculty/professor, ATPA Coach, at Montgomery College, Maryland. For more than fifteen years, I worked in education settings from secondary school counsellor position to university professor, focusing on teaching and research. In addition, I worked with immigrant families, including asylum seekers due to their past persecution in their home countries. I am the founder and director for CT Language Consultancy LLC which provides cultural brokering, translation, and interpretation services as well as professional support and recommendations to teachers, counselors, therapists and other staffs in early childhood education centers and schools through clarifying cultural issues and providing culture-related information and resources. I have volunteered in programs and organizations dealing with individuals with special needs including TASH, Save the Children, UNICEF and UNESCO and was awarded the... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Going to Scale--Research on Systems Change for People with Severe Disabilities: Education, Employment, Community Living, and Family Support
Limited Capacity seats available

The TASH Research and Publications Committee is sponsoring the 2nd Annual Research Colloquium on December 13, 2017 from 1:00-5:00 pm ET.

This Colloquium will present research on large scale efforts to improve major sectors that have a critical impact on the quality of life of people with severe disabilities, their families, fellow students, neighbors, and co-workers. Presenters will focus on research findings tracking the progress of efforts to reform key social systems. Although the speakers will focus on formal research, the presentations will be relevant for anyone interested in large scale efforts to improve the quality of life for people with severe disabilities and their peers through the life-span including researchers, advocates, family members, service providers and policy makers.

The speakers and their topics will be:
Robert Horner, University of Oregon: Research on School-wide Positive Behavior Support
David Mank, University of Indiana: Reforming Employment Practices
Hoon Choi, University of Kansas: Evaluation Evidence from the SWIFT Model of Inclusive School Reform
Fred Spooner, University of North Carolina at Charlotte: Research on the Academic Curriculum for Students with Severe Disabilities
Amy Hewitt, University of Minnesota: Progress in Community Inclusion
George HS Singer, University of California Santa Barbara: Family Support-- Evidence-based Practices

Each presenter will give a talk for 30 minutes and respond to questions from the audience.

Speakers
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
L405-L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

A Roadmap for Partnering to Create Meaningful Self-Determined Lives
Limited Capacity seats available

During this workshop, we will share strategies that are designed to embrace the principles of person-centered planning, self-direction and supported decision making, all of which increase opportunities for individuals with disabilities to enjoy full citizenship and maintain choice and control over their long-term services and supports (LTSS). These strategies provide people, professionals, and caregivers with reliable techniques to re-imagine the possibilities for meeting increasing support needs and achieving individual goals. Just as the civil rights movement had leaders from varying backgrounds, true citizenship and community inclusion for people with different abilities is not possible without the efforts and partnership of individuals and organizations who have varying roles in the long-term services and supports system and the community as a whole. This engaging and interactive workshop will provide opportunities for attendees to learn how three Wisconsin partners - a self-advocate, a representative state advocacy organization Disabilities, and a long-term care self-directed service provider organization collaborate to advance true citizenship and community inclusion for people with disabilities. Attendees will learn from an individual whose resilience has created a life that has spanned early experiences in a state institution to her current leadership role as executive director of a statewide advocacy organization. They will hear from a representative of Wisconsin's Board for People with Developmental Disabilities about strategies to build grassroots advocacy networks that empower all individuals to be heard in their communities. The presentation team also includes representatives from an organization that operates one of the largest and most comprehensive self-directed long-term services and support programs in the country. Self-direction and advocacy put the person and their loved ones in the driver's seat to control where, when, and how supports are provided. We will show you ways to help facilitate that. Choice and control through self-direction benefits not only the person, but can produce tangible benefits for state programs as well. Individuals self-directing their long-term services and supports through the Wisconsin IRIS (Include, Respect, I Self-Direct) program have, on average, spent 83% of their allocated budgets. You will learn how self-direction has engaged individuals, as well as their family and support networks, to implement real change. You'll also learn how to expand the capacity for services that sustain full lives and create valued roles in local communities. Approximately 90 percent of individuals live in a home that they own, rent, or share with family or friends, and less than two percent are disenrolled from the program due to placement in a licensed facility, including nursing homes.

Speakers
avatar for Patti Jo Becker

Patti Jo Becker

Manager of Community Partnerships, TMG by Magellan Health
Patti Jo Becker, M.S. brings more than 25 years of experience and passion to her current role. Her professional and personal life activities continue to influence the diverse fabric of self-directed long-term care supports. Patti’s work experiences include provider roles of direct support and management; consultant roles with families, advocates, and funding agencies as well as, advocacy in local, state and federal venues. Patti holds officer positions and serves on the Board of Directors for the Wisconsin Long Term Care Workforce Alliance, InControl Wisconsin, Respite Care Association of Wisconsin, Wisconsin... Read More →
avatar for Dave Verban

Dave Verban

Sr Learning and Development Consultant, TMG by Magellan Health
Dave Verban is an advocate, a teacher, and an ally, who is interested in citizenship, equity, access, and community. He is currently TMG’s Senior Learning and Development Consultant, supporting TMG’s culture of partnership by ensuring the principles of self-determination and... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Living Life in Color: Tools for Support Teams to Promote Community Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

"The colors of lifes journey should be bold and brilliant. Many people's lives are gray. People can be safe and happy, but gray. We bring bold color when we strive for opportunities." -Jeff Strully At KFI, we believe that paid and natural supports for people with intellectual disabilities must focus on full community participation, with opportunities to work, live and engage alongside neighbors. This is more than just a philosophy. It calls for a constant re-examination of our practices and outcomes. For the past two TASH conferences, KFI has shared some of the strategies we have learned that support all people, particularly people with challenging behavior, to live lives of full inclusion in their communities. After each of these sessions, our audience has asked for more information about how to engage support teams: staff, families, neighbors, friends, etc., in doing this challenging work. This Session will focus on facilitating the teamwork necessary to move beyond the mundane and engage people in meaningful lives. Our work builds on true person centered planning and requires a team that believes in the person and the community; a team that can see possibilities and build capacity for both. In our experience, this dream team does not just "happen". It requires thoughtful and emboldening leadership and communication. In a system where getting paid often means getting people "ready for life", it is too easy to get sidetracked with things like personal care routines, housework and laundry, meal preparation, and checkbook balancing. We don't necessarily look forward to doing these things; but they are precursors to work and leisure pursuits. This presentation will offer strategies to challenge teams to consider how the way they provide daily supports impacts how the person supported lives their life and contributes to their community. With positive proactive leadership, support teams can meet complex daily needs, at the same time they are doing the important work of building connections and supporting community life engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Gail Fanjoy

Gail Fanjoy

CEO, KFI
avatar for Lyann Grogan

Lyann Grogan

Hiring & Training Coordinator, KFI
After ten years of working in a segregated Mental Health setting as a Music Therapist at New Hampshire Hospital and serving as a member of the National Music Therapy Association’s Training Committee LyAnn found inspiration. She was inspired by KFI's mission to provide supports... Read More →
avatar for Laurie Kimball

Laurie Kimball

Director, KFI South, KFI
Laurie has made a career of facilitating support for people with disabilities to live real lives and participate in socially valued lifestyles in their communities. Laurie's passions are for positive approaches to challenging behavior, person centered services and building commu... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
L503 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

The Power of Valued Social Roles: Accessing the Good Life
Limited Capacity seats available

Many person-centered planning approaches continue to lead people to service based lives, often known as having a good but paid life. Understanding the devaluation people with disabilities live with, the concepts of heightened vulnerability and interpersonal identification, in addition to the power of valued social roles, can assist advocates, family members, and service providers in supporting people to access the good things in life. Participants will gain an understanding of devaluation and the wounds people experience when they are cast into devalued status in society. We will think about heightened vulnerability and interpersonal identification as potent advocacy tools and will explore visioning that focuses on valued social roles. We know that valued social roles can greatly impact people's lives and will discuss supporting people to acquire, strengthen, and maintain valued social roles. Through the presentation, we will address the lack of authority people with disabilities often have over their lives and supports, and what valued social roles can offer. People with disabilities need those who care about them and work with them to use understand the depth of devaluation and how to combat it through valued social roles.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:00pm - 5:00pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:15pm

Pennhurst: A Legacy of Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion in Disability Rights
Limited Capacity seats available

Pennhurst, the infamous Pennsylvania institution opened in 1908 and finally shut down in 1987, established a legacy of social equity and human rights in disability policy, advocacy, litigation, and laws. It stands as both an epicenter and a microcosm of America's Disability Civil Rights Movement in realms of education, fair treatment, and community life. Its story is especially germane to this year's threatened cuts to Medicaid funding for individual supports and services necessary to live in the community. Against the backdrop of twelve beautifully illustrated panels chronicling Pennhurst's history, our eyewitnesses will present a story of the human costs of this failed "institutional model of care" that prevailed across our nation and the world from the 20th century to the present day. Pennhurst taught all of us why segregating individuals with intellectual and severe disabilities was and continues to be so dehumanizing and so wrong. Ultimately, the famous Pennhurst Longitudinal Study, which has been replicated many times over, proved scientifically that people are much "better off" living in the community in terms of equity, opportunity, inclusion, and consequently quality of life. Since past is often prologue, this story must be retold to current and future generations ─ so that we discontinue and never repeat these mistakes again.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:15pm - 3:30pm
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:45pm

Promoting Transition-to-Employment Through Effective Partnerships Between Health Care and Supported Employment Providers
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation focuses on the important connections between health transition and school-to-work transition efforts. With the increased emphasis on ensuring that high school students with disabilities have opportunities to prepare for the world of work, it is equally important to ensure that students are exposed to basic This presentation focuses on the important connections between health transition and school-to-work transition efforts both of which are vital to achieving full equity, opportunity and inclusion in all aspects of community life for young people with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on ensuring that high school students with disabilities have opportunities to prepare for the world of work, it is equally important to ensure that students are exposed to basic principles of healthy living and are supported in the process of transition from pediatric to adult health care. Transition-to-work programs, operating in partnership with schools, are one avenue that can be used to deliver these concepts. Additionally, there is a growing trend within University-based medical centers to incorporate transition-to-work concepts into the medical clinical setting. Through combined and collaborative efforts such as these, youth with disabilities will enter the adult world with the skills they need to be healthy and productive employees and community members. This presentation will highlight two different approaches currently underway in South Dakota and Iowa to connect healthy living principles with transition-to-work interventions, and to bridge the worlds of health care and special education services in support of successful transition for youth with disabilities.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:45pm - 3:15pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:45pm

Tennessee's Transformation to Employment and Community First Services
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will describe the new service model initiated in the State of Tennessee as of July 1, 2016. Employment and Community First (ECF) was developed to eventually replaced the 1915c Waiver and bring in additional 2400 people with disabilities into services by the end of fiscal year 2018. The presentation gives specific details regarding the state's largest disability provider as it transitions from the previous model to the new ECF model. ECF was specifically designed for those who wish to gain employment and realize full community integration and inclusion. The details of this presentation should prove beneficial to the provider community, families, advocates, and people receiving services. It is expected that this model will be replicated in other states in coming years.

Speakers
avatar for Troy Allen

Troy Allen

Director of Community Employment Services, SRVS
Troy Allen’s career in the disability services field spans a twenty-nine year period. Prior to being appointed as SRVS Director of Community Employment Services, he collaborated in the development of a new community services model to assist individuals with disabilities in achieving full community integration and inclusion. During his SRVS career, Troy has also served as Director of SRVS Industries, Director of Quality Assurance, Director of Staff Development, Director of Incident Management and Project Manager for multiple state, local and organizational initiatives. While at SRVS Industries, he successfully launched the... Read More →
avatar for Alyson Edwards

Alyson Edwards

Director of Care Management, SRVS
Alyson has been involved in the disability field for fourteen years. She is the mother of a 14 year old daughter with Down syndrome that launched her into the disability world. Prior to her time at SRVS, Alyson spent nine years at the Down Syndrome Association of Memphis and the... Read More →
avatar for Angelica Woods-Smith

Angelica Woods-Smith

Vocational Rehabilitation Service Manager, SRVS
Angelica Woods-Smith has been in the field of rehabilitation counseling since 2012 and served as a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor with the State of Tennessee Department of Rehabilitation Services. She has a sincere passion for helping people with disabilities become gainfull... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:30pm

Chapter Leadership Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Agenda

2:30 - 3:00 - Introductions
Name, state/region, projects / goals / challenges / accomplishments of state / region chapter

3:00 - 3:30 - Ruthie & Ralph
Current state of TASH
Future Vision - Advocacy Teams
Role of Chapters

3:30 - 4:00 - Policy Update
Tia & Raquel
Inclusive Education Committee member TBD

4:00 - 4:45 - Activity Centers
Activity Centers (choose based on interest)

  1. Website/Social Link Assistance - Donald - TASH login, social link & group access)
  2. Existing Resources for Chapter Leaders - April - Google Drive resources - Making an annual plan
  3. Membership & Engagement - Jean & Cal-TASH member TBD


4:45 - 5:00 - Wrap Up & Looking Ahead
Meeting schedule for 2018
Future topics - Advocacy Team Follow-Up, Summer Retreat
Conference Announcements


Speakers
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis
avatar for Donald Taylor

Donald Taylor

Manager, Membership and Chapters, TASH
I am a member of the TASH staff. Mostly I'm going to be occupied running the conference. When I get to attend conference sessions, it will primarily be pertaining to my staff work on membership and chapters. Otherwise I will be staffing the TASH table. If you need help with anyth... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 2:30pm - 5:00pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:45pm

The Role of Informed Choice in Advancing Competitive Integrated Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

Recent laws, regulations, court cases and policies have included the requirement that people with disabilities be provided the opportunity to exercise informed choice in decision-making to promote inclusion and integration into society. These contemporary developments build on principles established in the early deinstitutionalization litigation, including rights to habilitation and to community settings as a remedy for unnecessary institutionalization. This workshop will present recent regulatory, legal and policy changes that can be utilized to promote competitive integrated employment. This will include discussion of Employment First initiatives, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Settings Final Rule, two landmark Department of Justice (DOJ) court cases (Oregon and Rhode Island) regarding sheltered workshops, the Olmstead decision by the Supreme Court and recent interpretations of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Friedman

Mark Friedman

Associate Professor, City University of New York (CUNY)
1. People with disabilities serving on boards of directors and policy making bodies. | 2. Online teaching. | 3. Disability Studies


Wednesday December 13, 2017 2:45pm - 5:00pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:30pm

Collaborating for Change: Improving Policies, Relationships and Competitive Integrated Employment Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

Historically, state agencies, community organizations, and individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities have worked independently to improve competitive integrated employment outcomes. This presentation will focus on lessons learned from 14 Partnerships in Employment state consortiums, which support stakeholder collaboration to change state and local employment policies and practices. Each state consortium brings together unique, but important partners that work together to overcome barriers to employment. Participants will hear from the national evaluator and a panel of Partnerships in Employment state consortium members from the District of Columbia, Hawaii and Utah. Topics include lessons learned about convening a consortium and improving relationships, strategies for introducing and implementing employment policies and legislation, and other project findings related to improving collaboration at the state, community, and individual level.

Speakers

Wednesday December 13, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:30pm

College and Career Readiness: What Are the Critical Dimensions for Youth with Severe Disabilities?
Limited Capacity seats available

Focused attention to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and college and career readiness (CCR) has been attributed to increased secondary school reform directed at ensuring all students graduate high school prepared for adulthood. In order to successfully experience college and careers, students must have the knowledge, skills, and experiences related to both core academics as well as non-academic competencies such as growth mindsets, problem-solving, and interpersonal engagement. This study sought out insights and perspectives from national experts to understand the skills, opportunities, and supports needed to ensure students with severe disabilities are college and career ready. The results of this Delphi Study offer insights of how to best prepare youth with severe disabilities in inclusive school and workplace communities.

Speakers
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and tran... Read More →
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, NM. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, soc... Read More →


Wednesday December 13, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:00pm

Exhibit Hall Open!
The Exhibit Hall will be open during these times.

Wednesday December 13, 2017 4:00pm - 7:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

PIE State Meeting & Networking
This meeting is for previous and current Partnerships in Employment State team members and leadership. Please join us for light refreshments, updates on project happenings and networking. Please contact Alison DeYoung at adeyoung@yestoemployment.org with any questions. 

Moderators
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Project Manager, Youth Employment Solutions Center / National TASH


Wednesday December 13, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

5:00pm

North Carolina TASH Chapter Meeting
Review current membership | Look at nominations for new officers | Update on 3rd annual Inclusion Summit | Discuss the Significant Cognitive Disabilities

Moderators
avatar for Karena Cooper-Duffy

Karena Cooper-Duffy

Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University

Wednesday December 13, 2017 5:00pm - 5:50pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

6:59pm

About the Film Festival
In addition to the hundreds of great presentations with the latest advancement in the field of inclusion, you'll also have the opportunity to experience the fine art of film making at the 2017 TASH Annual Conference.

Wednesday December 13, 2017 6:59pm - 7:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

7:00pm

Mr. Connolly Has ALS

Mr. Connolly Has ALS, directed by Dan Habib, features a high school principal who is embraced by his community as he continues to lead the school, despite rapidly losing his ability to walk and speak due to the debilitating effects of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). After the screening, Rud & Ann Turnbull will host a 10-15 minute Q&A session.


Speakers
avatar for Rud & Ann Turnbull

Rud & Ann Turnbull

Rud and Ann Turnbull have been professors, researchers, and advocates for individuals with disabilities, their families, and service providers for over four decades. Between them, they have authored over 40 books (including two leading textbooks now in their 7th and 8th editions) and over 500 articles and chapters. In 1999, they were selected by the National Preservation Trust in Developmental Disabilities as two of 36 individuals who have... Read More →



Wednesday December 13, 2017 7:00pm - 7:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

7:30pm

Unspoken
For years, Emma struggled to communicate her feelings, her needs, and her fears, to friends and family. It was a difficult time in which her intelligence, and desire to connect, was continually underestimated. Two years ago, for the first time in Emma's life, her true voice was finally heard when she began to type. Using this tool, Emma has defied all expectations and is finally able to have her thoughts expressed and understood by those around her. Having found her voice, Emma now advocates nationally for acceptance, tolerance and understanding. This is Emma’s debut as co-director. After the screening, the producer of the documentary, Geneva Peschka, will host a 10-15 minute Q&A session.

This documentary has been awarded TASH's 2017 Positive Images in the Media Award.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 7:30pm - 8:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00pm

i go home
The powerful one-hour documentary i go home chronicles the role institutionalization played in the life of people with intellectual disabilities in 1960s America. Using the story of Pennhurst State School and Hospital in eastern Pennsylvania as an example of the abuse and neglect that was taking place on a national level, the program details how those with intellectual disabilities were treated in society, the resulting changes that were needed, and the community-based efforts in place today. Archival photos and footage along with interviews with people with intellectual disabilities, advocates, researchers, scientists, parents, social workers, and many more help raise awareness about the issue and shine a light on the struggles and triumphs of the disability rights movement.


Wednesday December 13, 2017 8:00pm - 9:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:00pm

Bottom Dollars

When the Fair Labor Standards Act passed in 1938, it included a revolutionary civil rights protection: a minimum wage. American workers could no longer be exploited for their hard work – with one huge exception. Section 14(c) of the Act included an exemption allowing some workers, people with disabilities, to be paid less than minimum wage.

This provision was originally designed to persuade employers to hire people with disabilities and open up opportunities. Instead, people with disabilities were often employed in “sheltered workshops,” segregated workplaces away from their communities, earning sub-minimum wage.  78 years later, 14(c) remains in effect.

In 2016, nearly 250,000 people are legally paid less than the minimum wage, on average, less than $2 an hour.  “Bottom Dollars” is an hour long documentary that exposes the exploitation of people with disabilities through personal stories and expert interviews. It also presents clear employment alternatives with competitive wages and community inclusion. 

Do we want all people to have a shot at a job for fair pay in their own communities, or do we want some people to be separated, exploited and robbed of their chance to seize the American dream for themselves?



Wednesday December 13, 2017 9:00pm - 10:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303
 
Thursday, December 14
 

7:30am

Communications Working Group
The Communications Working Group will meet in person to discuss current initiataives and goals for 2018.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 7:30am - 8:20am
Hospitality Suite - Room 4029

8:00am

Quiet Room
The quiet room is available for all TASH conference attendees, and is located on the Lobby level just down the hall from the hotel's concierge desk.

Thursday December 14, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
L502 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
The Exhibit Hall will be open during these times.

Thursday December 14, 2017 8:00am - 7:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:15am

Opening General Session
Ten Truths From 150 (or 200) Years Of Our Lives

How did it happen? By the time we meet at the TASH conference in December, I (Rud) will have turned 80. Ann will have turned 70. And Jay, our son, would have been 50. Add the years. The parents equal 150 years and the parents and son equal 200. What lessons have we learned? Which lessons have withstood the test of time? What are our ten truths? We subscribe to full disclosure: be ready for humility, humor, hurt, humanism, and hugs. Maybe even for knowledge that became wisdom!

Speakers
avatar for Rud & Ann Turnbull

Rud & Ann Turnbull

Rud and Ann Turnbull have been professors, researchers, and advocates for individuals with disabilities, their families, and service providers for over four decades. Between them, they have authored over 40 books (including two leading textbooks now in their 7th and 8th editions) and over 500 articles and chapters. In 1999, they were selected by the National Preservation Trust in Developmental Disabilities as two of 36 individuals who have... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 8:15am - 9:30am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:44am

About Breakout Sessions
Breakout Sessions are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Thursday December 14, 2017 9:44am - 5:15pm
TBA

9:45am

Access to the General Education Curriculum within Inclusive Classrooms for Students with Complex Support Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

This ethnographic study investigated how educators support students with complex support needs to access the grade-level literacy curriculum within elementary, general education classrooms. Examination of multiple data sources across four classrooms in one school revealed a comprehensive understanding of how the educators support the focus students to be included in grade-level literacy activities using both class-wide and individualized strategies. The findings of this study contribute to the knowledge of how to implement inclusive practices in general education classrooms, which may support increased implementation of inclusive education. The findings of this study also illustrated the educators' passion and excitement for implementing the best possible strategies and practices in order to ensure that the students with complex support needs are held to high expectations, that they are successful, and that they are true members of the classroom community.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Hartzell

Rebecca Hartzell

Doctoral Student, University of Arizona
I am a PhD candidate at the University of Arizona. My area of interest in social engagement in students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Emotional Behavioral Disorder (EBD).
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, NM. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, soc... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Addressing Equality in Person-Centered Planning
Limited Capacity seats available

Even after years of person-centered planning and thinking, we still miss the mark when we make plans without addressing social inequities and barriers. We may be accessing and playing on the same field but is it really equal or are there still barriers that have to be overcome with "specialized" services and supports. What questions and discussions are we having to level that playing field and ensure equal access to all, addressing the barriers and internalized oppression? During this session we will discuss and problem solve these issues and come up with actions we can all take back to obliterate barriers and truly support all people to live fully included and equal in their community of choice. We will share stories and struggles to begin the conversation.

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Lengyel

Jenny Lengyel

Executive Director, Total Living Concept
I am a fun, passionate and friendly person. I believe in and fight for Social Justice and the rights of all human beings. I love to read and listen to country music.


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Addressing Multiple Priorities in Academic Core Content Instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

Secondary teachers of students with extensive support needs are tasked with helping their students prepare for successful post-secondary outcomes by setting and making progress toward meaningful goals related to self-determination, social and communication skills, and other individualized needs. Federal law also mandates that teachers provide academic core content instruction that is aligned with grade level standards, and recent federal rulings (e.g., Endrew v. Douglas County) have highlighted the need for instruction to be specially designed based on the unique needs of individual students with disabilities. The impact of standards-based instruction on the adult lives of individuals with extensive support needs is yet to be seen, but increased academic opportunities will provide an increased level of skills over prior generations. One way educators can meet the unique individual needs of their students is to integrate transition skills and goals within academic instruction. This presentation will provide guidance to educators on how to ensure academic core content instruction is personally relevant for secondary students with extensive support needs in the areas of literacy, mathematics, and science.


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Comparing the Instructional Days of Students in Inclusive Classrooms vs. Segregated Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will be focused on a matched comparison study of 32 students in a school district where 16 students were included in general education and 16 were educated in segregated classrooms. This study was carried out in the spring of 2017 and has great significance for TASH's mission of inclusive education for all. The study compares the level of social and instructional engagement in a typical school day for each pair of students.


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Creating Pathways to Employment for Young People with IDD
Limited Capacity seats available

Compared to youth without disabilities, integrated employment is lower for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In DC, too many young people with disabilities still graduate from high school into a Day Program rather than college or a job. The DC Department on Disabilities Services in 2016 received a five year Partners in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to establish cross-agency relationships, implement policy and program improvements, and transform systems to increase integrated employment. Through this grant initiative, called DC Learners and Earners, we are working with self-advocates, families, the UCEDD and DD Council, and other community and government partners to raise expectations, transform our service system, and improve employment outcomes for young people with disabilities. DC is one of the initial 6 states to participate in the Community of Practice (CoP) for Supporting Families of Individuals with Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities, which involves collaborations at all levels to develop systems of support for families throughout the lifespan of their family member with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The overall goal of supporting families, with all of their complexity, strengths and unique abilities is so they can best support, nurture, love and facilitate opportunities for the achievement of self-determination, interdependence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of community life for their family members. The DC Learners and Earners Initiative builds on the successful work of the DC Supporting Families CoP. Person-Centered Thinking, the LifeCourse Framework, and Cultural and Linguistic Competency are the lenses through which we view all of our efforts to transform our system, and they are the foundation of our efforts to improve employment outcomes for people with IDD, as well as for our system change efforts more broadly. Families can be our greatest cheerleaders for person-centered and employment first systems change and our strongest advocates, or they can be barriers to systems change. In DC, we wanted to make sure that as we reformed our IDD system, we were working closely with the people we support and their families and were guided by their experiences. We used the LifeCourse & PCT to reframe vision of what success looks like at the individual and systems level and build a shared responsibility for systems change. Panelists from the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice will describe how we have used Person-Centered Thinking and LifeCourse tools and skills to identify areas for systemic advocacy and build shared responsibility for the levels of change that must occur to advance our system of supports for people with and their families, throughout a person's life. With support from the National Center for Cultural Competency at the DC UCEDD, the DC CoP has explored cultural and linguistic diversity so that we are attempting to reach all families. Panelists will share an example of training tools we use with self-advocates, families, partners, and professionals to explore culture and discuss some of our successes and lessons learned. Hear from parents, self-advocates and professionals who use Person-Centered Thinking and the LifeCourse framework skills and tools to promote self-determination, inclusion, and competitive integrated employment. Panelists will share successes in engaging families to not only help the family envision and plan a good life for themselves and their children, but also to better inform state systems change through deep engagement with families. This session will conclude with an interactive question and answer panel discussing how to apply lessons learned in their own state to engage families of all cultures and improve employment outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Christopher

Joan Christopher

research instructor, Georgetown University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities
Activities and programs to support people with disabilities and their families
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate g... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Wright

Kevin Wright

RSA/Self Advocate, Department on Disability Services (DDS)
I'm 25 years old who was born and raised in Washington, DC. I attended college at Mitchell College in New London, CT for four years. My major was Communications with a minor in Graphic Design. Now working at DDS where I first started out as an intern. Doing my time at DDS, I been... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Diversity in Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Who's In, Who's Out?
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this presentation is to disseminate survey data that examines the diversity (or lack thereof) in transition and postsecondary programs for students with intellectual disabilities. Two surveys were developed to examine the recruitment and participation of students from diverse backgrounds with intellectual disabilities in these programs. One of the study objectives is to determine if the representation of individuals from diverse backgrounds in transition and postsecondary programs is commensurate with their representation in the population at large and in the K-12 high school population. Therefore, one of the surveys asks directors to respond to questions about demographics of participant students and program staff and the use of recruitment strategies aimed at students from diverse backgrounds. The second survey was designed for the students in transition and postsecondary programs and enquires about their participation and methods used to retain and recruit them in the program. Postsecondary education programs including vocational/technical schools, two-year community colleges, and four-year universities enable students to continue their education after high school and are becoming a minimum standard for attaining a well-paying job. According to Banks (2014), about 70% of high school graduates go on to postsecondary programs, however only nine percent of students with disabilities attend such programs. Banks (2014) also reports that, of students with disabilities who attend college or university, 72% of freshmen are White, while only nine percent of freshmen with disabilities are Black/African-American. Black/African American students with disabilities are less than half as likely as White students to earn a college degree or certificate (Banks, 2014). With the identified importance of postsecondary education programs, there has been a move towards creating more inclusive postsecondary programs, such as programs designed to include students with intellectual disabilities. The goal of these postsecondary programs is for students to master the skills needed to gain integrated competitive employment. Achieving such employment will give students access to higher wages, health and monetary benefits, inclusive communities and work places, and higher job satisfaction (Grigal et al., 2015). Postsecondary education programs provide students with disabilities the self-sufficiency, self-determination, and social skills training and practice needed to be successfully hired in integrated and competitive places of employment. Programs for college students with intellectual disabilities are becoming increasingly popular with more than 800 students enrolled in programs across the nation (Grigal et al., 2015). Sadly, disproportionality related to students from diverse backgrounds impacts these programs. Even though students from diverse backgrounds are overrepresented in the intellectual disability category in K-12 schools, they are underrepresented in postsecondary education programs. Grigal et al. (2015) reports that "the majority of students were white (73%), 15% were black or African American, and 10% were Hispanic or Latino" (p. 2). Since these numbers mirror the percentages of individuals by race/ethnicity in the general population, the disproportional representation of students from diverse backgrounds may not seem that extreme. However, when the data is disaggregated by state, the disproportionality becomes more obvious, especially in states that have a diverse population. For example, in Florida, the most recent data report students from diverse backgrounds comprise more than 50% of K-12 students. However, the percentage of students from diverse backgrounds in Broward County, FL is 74.3%. Based on these percentages, we should expect Florida postsecondary transition programs to have higher percentages of students from diverse backgrounds. The purpose of this study is to determine if that really is the case nationally. We suspect not. The data (i.e., 73% white, 15% black or African American and 10% Hispanic or Latino) reported by Grigal et al. (2015) increases the likelihood we are correct in our suspicions. This leads to the question we are asking in our research. Why are there not more students from diverse backgrounds enrolling and participating in these beneficial, and potentially fully funded, programs? This study seeks answers to this question and to emphasize the need for these programs to create recruitment and retention processes that ensure "equity, opportunity, and inclusion" of students from diverse backgrounds, consistent with the TASH 2017 theme.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Kearney

Kelly Kearney

Doctoral Student, Florida Atlantic University
People can talk to me about: | Inclusive education | Microenterprises | Puppies


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Enacting Self-Determination: How Adults with IDD and their Siblings Make Decisions
Limited Capacity seats available

As individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are beginning to outlive their parents, siblings are assuming- and are often expected to fulfill- caregiving and other related roles. Such roles are critical in supporting self-determination of individuals with IDD. Yet, most research only focuses on sibling perspectives, thus excluding the viewpoints of individuals with IDD. To address these needs, this study explored how nine adult sibling pairs make decisions concerning employment, independent living, and self-determination. This focus aligns with the conference's "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" theme in that examination of the perspectives of both siblings and individuals with IDD can inform intervention and efforts to promote self-determination and community participation by individuals with IDD and greater sibling involvement in family supports. Implications for future planning and collaboration with siblings will be presented.


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Inclusion Outreach: Distance Consultancy to Schools Supporting Inclusive Education for Students with Complex Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusion Outreach (IO) is a multidisciplinary British Columbia Ministry of Education Provincial Outreach Program that supports 120 students with complex support needs to be included in schools throughout the province. IO and Open School BC partnered to develop an e-mentoring project that provides service continuity for these students in an innovative way. Using a Learning Management System (LMS) we have created secure, password protected student-specific websites as information repositories . In addition, using videos, discussion boards, and web conferencing, staff can now connect on a regular basis with parents and the school-based teams that support each student. This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme "Still we Rise for Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion" by describing an approach to build local capacity to support inclusive education that enhances current and future quality of life for students with complex support needs. More information is available at www.inclusionoutreach.ca

Speakers
CJ

Christopher Jenkins

Coordinator, BC Provincial Inclusion Outreach Program
Christopher J. Jenkins, PhD. is Teacher/Coordinator of Inclusion Outreach, a British Columbia Ministry of Education Provincial Outreach Program that supports inclusion for students with multiple and complex needs throughout BC. Chris has had a long and varied career as a teacher... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Key Components Of High Quality Inclusive Post-Secondary Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Post-secondary education opportunities for students with disabilities have become much more available than they used to be and there are now a large number of such initiatives throughout the country. These initiatives differ in their structure and approaches. This session will focus on key components of an inclusive mindset and outline some useful concepts for creating a high quality inclusive post secondary education such as (a) utilization of culturally valued analogues, (b) the necessity of having a deep understanding of the social role of a post secondary student and (c) finding ways to compensate for vulnerabilities to stigma and low expectations; We will look at quality from different perspectives e.g., students, faculty, and family members. As well, barriers and obstacles to quality will be identified and we will engage participants in brainstorming ways to deal with these barriers. This presentation will highlight lessons learned from the Integrated Studies program at Millersville University and the work of the Pennsylvania Inclusive Higher Education Consortium.


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Opportunity to Learn: Providing a Free and Appropriate Education
Limited Capacity seats available

The Endrew vs. Johnson case has provided an excellent stepping stone for re-evaluating what it means to provide students with disabilities with a free and appropriate public education (FAPE).  We propose using our revised Opportunity to Learn construct to help administrators and special eduation directors have a better metric of whether or not they are creating an educational program that would meet the legal requirements of FAPE.

Speakers
DT

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Peer-delivered Strategies to Promote Communication of High School Students in Inclusive Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

Despite research has examined the impact of naturalistic strategies with younger students when the intervention was delivered by adults, little is known about the generalizability of peer-implemented naturalistic strategies when implemented with older students with disabilities. A single-case multiple-probe design across participants was used to evaluate the effect of naturalistic strategies delivered by peers of three high school students with severe disabilities in inclusive classrooms. A paraprofessional served an interventionist, who delivered a brief training to peer partners and provided prompts as needed in each classroom. We collected data on the focus students' independent and prompted initiations and responses toward peers and adults as well as peer partners prompting behaviors. Results indicated a functional relation established between the intervention and increased social communication of the focus students. We will discuss implications and provide recommendations for educational teams who wish to advance the inclusion outcomes of all students.

Speakers
avatar for Yun-Ching Chung

Yun-Ching Chung

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University
Yun-Ching Chung is an assistant professor in the department of special education at Illinois State University. Her research interests include peer interactions, inclusion outcomes of students who use augmentative and alternative communication, and paraprofessional facilitation.


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Sexuality: Risk, Rights, and Direct Support Professionals
Limited Capacity seats available

Providing supports concerning a person's sexuality can be an very complicated process that involves careful consideration of equity, opportunity, and inclusion. While many plans may be written, the actual duties of making and enacting complicated decisions often rests in the hands of Direct Support Professionals (DSPs). Despite DSPs central role in our systems of supports, the voices and perspectives of these men and women has not been adequately represented in the literature. In this breakout session the perspectives of 12 men and women with a combined 106 years of experience as DSPs will be presented. Specifically, the words of these participants will be used to explore how they perceive sexuality for people with intellectual disability with regards to navigating the boundaries between risk and rights, safety and empowerment.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Work Incentive Planning Assistance (WIPA)
Limited Capacity seats available

WIPA (Work Incentive Planning Assistance) is a Social Security Administration program whose mission is to provide the specific work incentives planning and assistance services that will directly assist Social Security beneficiaries to succeed in their return-to-work or in the case of students to join the work force. WINs (Work Incentive Navigators) provide a base level of informational support to all eligible beneficiaries contacting the program and to take significant steps to ensure individuals with all types of disabilities, from every type of diverse ethnic background, and from varying age groups and geographic locations are able to access and benefit from the WIPA program.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Garrett

Linda Garrett

Work Incentive Navigator, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency
Work with individuals receiving disability from SSA helping them understand how working will affect their governmental benefits
avatar for Adrienne Williams

Adrienne Williams

Manager Benefits Coordination, GVRA
Manager of Benefits Coordination for Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) and am also a certified CWIC (Community Work Incentive Coordinator). | | In this capacity I manage the Social Security funded Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program (WIPA) which ass... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Virginia TASH Chapter Meeting
Virginia attendees!! Please join us to hear about our push for inclusive education and the right to communicate.

Moderators
avatar for Elizabeth Altieri

Elizabeth Altieri

Professor, Radford University
I am passionate about inclusion. I have been an advocate and supporter of Inclusive Education and Community since the 1970s and first joined TASH in 1979. I have teaching and administrative experience with inclusive programs for school-aged students and adults with disabilities d... Read More →

Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

The Right to Education and the Endrew F. Decision
Limited Capacity seats available

On June 14, 2017, TASH presented Thomas J. Gilhool with its first annual Outstanding Leadership in Disability Law Award at a symposium and dinner that focused on the right to education.  Thomas J. Gilhool was selected as the first recipient of this award for his successful legal advocacy in PARC v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the lawsuit that set the stage for the passage of P.L..94-142 (now IDEA).  At the symposium, he and three colleagues discussed the implications of the Endrew F. decision on the future of special education.  This session recreates that panel presentation and offers insights into the future of the right to education in the 21st century.


Speakers
JG

Judith Gran

Judith Gran, Esq. is a partner in the law firm Reisman Carolla Gran LLP, specializing in disability law.  She has a national practice focused on disability rights and has represented clients in more than a half dozen states in disputes over inclusion and community service plans. ... Read More →
avatar for Frank Laski

Frank Laski

Frank Laski is engaged in a public interest law practice focused on representation of persons with disabilities and their organizations.  He is a former Executive Director of the Massachusetts Mental Health Legal Advisors Committee.  He was also Director of Disability Projects for the Public Interest Law Center of... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Autonomy in More Ways than One
Limited Capacity seats available

Community Living Services (CLS) is a large nonprofit corporation serving persons in Michigan. CLS promotes "community inclusion, full citizenship, and a self-determined life" for nearly 4,000 people of all ages with developmental disabilities. Many adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities are perceived to require assistance from others to help make decisions regarding supports and services received. Often time they are forced to give up their person-hood and autonomy through legal means in order to receive the very supports necessary for them to gain control of their lives. Structural changes within the support system and organizational practices are necessary. This session will describe the alternative support options that preserve autonomy, with emphasis on those that maintain the highest level of freedom and authority for the individual. This session will describe supports that when implemented honestly, act to shift control from the system to the person. The supports covered will include; independent facilitation, person-centered planning, self-determination, individual budgeting, supported decision-making, right of tenancy and fiscal intermediary services. CLS is a legacy organization originally formed 34 years ago to help people move out of state run institutions into the group homes developed in the community. CLS is the largest single "C" Habilitation Supports waiver provider in the state serving people with significant disabilities. CLS has undertaken significant transformation over the past 22 years. In early 1990s CLS oversaw 250 - 6 bed licensed group homes, housing over 1,400 people. In 2017, 85 group homes remain housing 376 people, 1,300 are supported in their own home and the remaining 2,300 are supported within their family. This presentation will describe the policy and organization changes that were made, built on the principles of self-determination, to shift control from provider operated systems and professional guardianship agencies to people who in growing numbers live in homes they own or rent, with housemates and support staff of their choice. Consequently, the changes made in operations have also resulted in CLS being proactively aligned with the HCBS rules. This will also be described during the course of the presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Dohn Hoyle

Dohn Hoyle

Director of Public Policy, The Arc Michigan
Dohn Hoyle is the currently the Director of Public Policy (formerly the Executive Director) of The Arc of Michigan and a long-time advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. A respected leader and innovator in the disability movement, Dohn helped to rewrite the Michigan... Read More →
avatar for Paul Newman

Paul Newman

Chief Operating Officer/Vice President of Operations, Community Living Services, Inc.
Paul Newman is the Chief Operating Officer/Vice President of Operations of Community Living Services, Inc., Michigan.  CLS is a non-profit organization supporting over 4000 people with developmental disabilities in the Southeast Michigan area. Paul has been instrumental in syste... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Capacity Building for People Who Use Keyboards and Letter Boards to Communicate
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this session is to engage in a discussion about building capacity for systems and inclusive environments that support people who type and use letter boards to communicate. Four nonspeaking autistic panelists will share their incredible journeys into learning to use letter boards and keyboards as their primary method of communication, along with the support systems that allowed them to be communicatively successful. The panelists include Tracy Thresher (a self-advocate who was featured in Wretches and Jabberers documentary), Larry Bissonnette (an artist and self-advocate featured in Wretches and Jabberers documentary), Emma Zurcher Long (a teenage self-advocate and blogger at Emma's Hope Book), Rhema Russell (a young self-advocate and blogger at Rhema's Hope) and Diego Pena (a 9 year-old author of bestselling book, Anatomy of Autism). The panelists will share their personal stories and insights into the approaches, supports, and systems that have been put into place to facilitate their inclusion as people who communicate differently. This session will contribute to conversations about the power of access to communication, inclusion, and equitable opportunities for people with autism. Concrete practice and policy recommendations will be discussed with educators and professionals who are increasingly being called to support the communication and educational needs of students with autism. Dr. Edlyn Pena will moderate the panel presentations and a follow-up interactive discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Thresher

Tracy Thresher

Mentor and Communication Consultant, Washington County Mental Health
Tracy Thresher is a native Vermonter who lives and works in Vermont. Tracy began using Facilitated Communication in 1990 and was one of the first individuals with autism in Vermont to be introduced to the method. He has presented at local, statewide and national workshops and conferences. Tracy is an employee of Washington County Mental Health Services and has consulted with local schools and adult service agencies, mentors high school students and adults with communication challenges, is a member of the Vermont Statewide Communication Task Force, the WCMHS Communication Alliance and does freelance work for Green Mountain Self-Advocates and works with the Wellspring Guild as a Master Trainer. Tracy and his friend Larry travel the world promoting their documentary... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Co-Creating Individualized Supports with Families and Individuals
Limited Capacity seats available

Shifting from program offerings to individualized supports requires a realignment of relationships between government, providers, families, individuals with disabilities and various community entities. This session explores the contextual and practical aspects that encourage co-created supports as opposed to a delegated service arrangement. Personal and organizational examples of creative support arrangements including paid-neighbors and living near and next to staffing from people and agencies involved in seeking to change the pattern from programs offerings to co-created individualized supports will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Hanns Meissner

Hanns Meissner

CEO, The Arc of Rensselaer County
Organizational Change and Development, Social Innovation, Systems Change, Person-Centered Work


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Effects of Interacting with College Students with Intellectual Disability on Natural Supports
Limited Capacity seats available

The basis for this session is to share the impact of inclusive programs that serve students with intellectual disabilities (ID) on people who do not have disabilities and support each other in their college experiences (Caseboltt & Hodge, 2010; Isso & Shuman, 2013; Rao, 2004). The purpose of this qualitative research was to explore the impact of direct service learning experiences completed during an introductory special education course on a college campus in the southeastern United States. More specifically, researchers examined written reflections of college students who interacted and directly supported individuals with intellectual disability living and participating in various activities within their college community. NVivo was used to analyze and determine attitude changes and interactions towards individuals with ID. The presentation relates specifically to the 2017 TASH conference theme as it highlights truly inclusive community practices while celebrating human rights in a college community that embraces inclusion.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Endrew F defines FAPE: Where do we go from here?
Limited Capacity seats available

Chief Justice Roberts' ruling in Endrew F. makes clear that the essential function of the IEP is academic and functional advancement of the child. School districts must be able to show that the proposed IEP does more than comply with the IDEA's procedural safeguards. Advancing a student from grade to grade is not a true measure of progress - especially when IEP goals are repeated annually and there are no expectations that the child is able to learn. The goals "must be appropriately ambitious " as the true test of the appropriate in FAPE. We will look at some tactics to make Justice Roberts' reasoning a reality in the IEP Team meeting.

Speakers
JG

Judith Gran

Judith Gran, Esq. is a partner in the law firm Reisman Carolla Gran LLP, specializing in disability law.  She has a national practice focused on disability rights and has represented clients in more than a half dozen states in disputes over inclusion and community service plans. ... Read More →
avatar for Frank Laski

Frank Laski

Frank Laski is engaged in a public interest law practice focused on representation of persons with disabilities and their organizations.  He is a former Executive Director of the Massachusetts Mental Health Legal Advisors Committee.  He was also Director of Disability Projects for the Public Interest Law Center of... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Engaging Diverse Communities in a Peer Support Program for Parents of Children with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Effective peer support is an important to the promotion of wellbeing in parents of children with disabilities or special healthcare needs, who may suffer from higher levels of stress due to increased caretaking burden and difficulty navigating systems of care. Parents from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) communities may bear the effects of additional stressors such as; economic instability, language barriers, limited access to disability-related information and lack of social support. Unfortunately, families from culturally and linguistically diverse groups may not reach out to disability organizations for help, and when they do, the support that they receive may not be culturally sensitive and can inadvertently increase stress in the parent. In this session, we describe an evidence-based peer support program, address barriers to serving CLD families and describe some promising practices. Future research needs will also be addressed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Families Supporting Social Inclusion for Their Adult Children: Lessons about Family Research
Limited Capacity seats available

This study determined if approaches and strategies which have been used by agency staff (such as in group homes) to increase social inclusion of adults can also be used by families to increase inclusion for their adult children living at home, or how these strategies need to be adapted for use by families. No such study has been previously conducted in training families in this way and on this topic. Most people with intellectual/developmental disabilities live with their families, yet research with this group is limited. In addition, while children may be included while they are in school, families identify social inclusion as a major issue once their child graduates from school. The study identified barriers in recruiting families, as well as issues that need to be addressed in intervention studies in the family home. For the families who continued through the training/intervention phase of 24-30 months, successful outcomes for their adult children included an increased number of individual friendships with community members, joining community groups and associations, and valued social roles in community life.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Family Correlates of Transition to Employment for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Students with significant disabilities face barriers in obtaining meaningful employment upon exiting the school system (Carter, Austin, & Trainor, 2012). In a national study, only 26% of students with significant disabilities were employed two years after high school (Carter et al., 2012). To develop effective interventions to improve the transition to employment, it is important to identify malleable predictors of employment for students with significant disabilities. To determine correlates of transition variables related to employment, 62 parents of transition-aged youth (ages 14-22) with significant disabilities (i.e. students with intellectual disability, autism, or multiple disabilities, who participated in an alternate assessment) were surveyed. Results indicated that parents with greater empowerment had increased transition knowledge, better family-school partnerships, and less unmet student needs. Parents with greater transition knowledge and/or better family-school partnerships also had less unmet student needs. There was also a positive correlation between the independence of the youth and level of employment knowledge of the parent.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

How Access to Social Capital Shape Special Education Teachers' Jobs
Limited Capacity seats available

Previous research indicates access to social capital and the social ties teachers make with their colleagues, can influence their job efficacy, autonomy, and satisfaction. Specifically, the social ties teachers obtain participating in leadership or mentorship activities may provide opportunities for social network support or access to novel information. However, few research studies have examined this phenomenon with special education teachers, especially teachers working with students with significant disabilities. To that end, this study examined the special education teachers in the School and Staffing Survey of 2011-12 to study how leadership opportunities, through access to social capital, shape special education teachers' job outcomes. We find that leadership and mentorship improves teacher efficacy, satisfaction, and autonomy but that these the relationship is likely moderated by individual and institutional factors such as teaching in a self-contained classroom or in rural communities, respectively.

Speakers
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

Special Education Doctoral Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison`


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Inclusive Neighborhood Public School Benefit ALL in the Community - Gathering ALL Parents!
Limited Capacity seats available

Parents and educators from the TASH Inclusive Education Committee will remind us of the true meaning of inclusive education; identify barriers to inclusive neighborhood public schools created by flawed assumptions about student with disabilities, early intervention practices that over-emphasize medically-based approaches, and lack of family engagement; and share success stories. Participants will develop an inclusive education/life vision for their child/student and learn strategies for enlisting diverse inclusive education allies in their own communities.

Speakers
VM

Veronica McGee

I am a parent of a son born with congenital hydrocephalus. Kyle is 17 and is nonverbal and uses both a manual and power chair. I am here with my very good friend and advocate, Susan Ellis. She educated, supported and brought so much clarity to our ongoing journey with Kyle's p... Read More →
avatar for Barbara J. McKenzie

Barbara J. McKenzie

Chairperson, Ohio TASH
Barb McKenzie is an advocate, presenter, and organizer of gatherings about the importance of creating inclusive communities. The chair of Ohio TASH, she participates on International TASH’s Inclusive Education committee. Barb is the author of “Reflections of Erin – the Impo... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Lives in Classrooms. How Children and Teachers Navigate Learning in Inclusive Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2017, the conference theme "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" is embedded in our work in local schools researching how educators worked together to deliver high quality reading instruction to ALL students. Our research team spent a year with teachers and students in 10 schools and five school districts in Kansas and California to deliver a well-researched emergent literacy program in general education classrooms. We had a front-row seat watching how teachers and students navigated learning academic content. Our study examined how the ELSB program affected and facilitated the development of teacher-students, teacher-teacher, and student-student relationships in small group settings in general education classrooms. We were able to observe how general and special education teachers negotiated their roles, the use of space in the classroom, handled discipline issues, and learned to talk together about their work. As well, we observed how children's relationships changed over time as they got to know each other through participation in specific learning routines. The results affirm the benefits to students and educators when the boundaries between general and special education merge into one.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Peer Supports: Let's Make it Happen!
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," by providing knowledge necessary to utilize peers as a support in order to successfully include students with significant disabilities in general education classrooms. Peer support can foster opportunities for students with disabilities to be included and engaged in the same activities as their peers. This session explains in detail the step-by-step process of how to set up a peer tutoring system within a school site. During this interactive workshop, five training sessions developed for peer tutors will be explained and essential roles and responsibilities of peer tutors will be discussed. Research conducted by the presenter on peer tutoring will also be shared. This session prepares participants with the tools and resources they need to implement a peer tutoring system at the middle and high school levels, providing students a right to a free and appropriate public education with the supports necessary to be successful.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Self-Determination: Making It Happen
Limited Capacity seats available

Is it your goal that all students graduate from high school ready for their postschool experience? Making that leap from child to independent adult requires the development and expression of self-determination. Explicit self-determination instruction teaches students ways to fully accept responsibility for their lives and actively participate in their education. Building self-determination is not just a curriculum choice, it's a way of interacting. This session will provide you with: "The research behind self-determination skills," IDEA requirements that support self-determination instruction as a transition initiatives, "Information and strategies to support the state-wide student-led IEP initiative as part of your pre-employment transition services", and research-based strategies and tools that you can use in your interaction with students to build self-determination skills.

Speakers
EJ

Elise James

Other Staff Position Not Listed, GADOE


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Training Paraprofessionals to Work in Inclusive Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

Coming soon!

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Cal-TASH Chapter Meeting & Introduction
Meet other inclusion-minded people from California in an information meet and greet.  We will share Cal-TASH's mission and you will learn more about how to become involved in our energetic, motivated chapter.

Speakers
avatar for Molly K. Rearick

Molly K. Rearick

Founder & Director, Reid's Gift, Inc.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

11:00am

RPSD Associate Editors Meeting
Associate Editors will meet to discuss the status of the journal and make plans for the upcoming year.

Speakers
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Thursday December 14, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Hospitality Suite - Room 4029

12:00pm

Let's Connect Luncheon
Attendees will select from six luncheons to attend. Boxed lunches must be pre-ordered and paid for during the registration process.

Mini-lunch topics will include: 
  • Communication Access (M304) - Facilitated by Amy Hanreddy
  • Employment (Imperial Ballroom) - Facilitated by Alison DeYoung
  • Families and Siblings (M302) - Facilitated by Raquel Rosa
  • Human Rights (M303)
  • Inclusive Education (Imperial Ballroom) - Facilitated by Jennifer A. Kurth
  • Self-Advocates (M301) - Facilitated by Tia Nelis

Thursday December 14, 2017 12:00pm - 12:50pm
TBA

1:00pm

Advocating for Change: Working in Collaboration to Make a Difference
Limited Capacity seats available

Project ACTION! is a regional self-advocacy coalition of adults with developmental disabilities that has been active for over 25 years in DC, MD and VA. As a small advocacy coalition they chose too "Still Rise for Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion" when they did not have any funding to support them to advocate with City Council, attend and travel to local and national conferences, to host training sessions for new self-advocates and more. Self-advocacy and the education of decision makers and government officials is critical to the success of having policies and programs be person-centered and meet the needs of people with disabilities who will use them. The Project ACTION! presenters will share how they have successfully advocated for change in the government system that provides their disability supports over the years. They will share how they choose to work with non-disability coalitions and groups and have a seat at the table so even more people will know about the needs of people with disabilities. The issues and challenges that self-advocates face are issues and challenges for others also who may not have a disability and that's where the cross-issue collaborative can have a great impact.

Speakers
PH

Phyllis Holton

Deputy Director for Operations, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Curriculum Focus and Instructional Context: What Do Teachers Believe is Important for Secondary Students with Severe Disabilities?
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will focus on special education teachers' beliefs about effective curriculum for high school students with severe disabilities, and the context in which that curriculum is best delivered. Findings from a recent study will serve as the basis for discussion about how to prepare teachers to make curricular decisions.

Speakers
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Designing a Universal Design for Learning Lab, Lessons Learned for P-20 Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

Designing a Universal Design for Learning Lab, Lessons Learned for P-20 Inclusion Kennesaw State University has recently opened a Universal Design for Learning Lab (UDLab), which is a model classroom equipped with innovative high and low technology to assist learners in accessing curriculum and instruction. The goal for this breakout presentation is for TASH advocates to explore high-leverage practices of assistive technology and Universal Design to support full inclusion of diverse learners across the P-20 trajectory. Session participants engage in hands-on experiential learning of a wide variety of technologies that provide access to opportunities for all students, particularly those students of color with disabilities. While the University provides program accessibility and accommodations for persons with disabilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Georgia Legislature has increased its focus on programming specific to Inclusive Post-secondary Education. The primary goal of the UDLab is for every preservice or inservice teacher who graduates from KSU to be knowledgeable about Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology (QIAT) and how emerging, innovation, and assistive technologies help prepare ALL students. The 2016 U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reported that 12.9% of children with disabilities between the ages 6- 21 years old were served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in 2013-14. NCES also indicated that Georgia recorded 162,884 served under IDEA, which is approximately 7% of Georgia's public school population. The UDLab hosted 582 visitors from within and outside of the KSU community during the inception year, 2016-17. Visitor feedback consisted of the following comments: learned about new topics that cover transition services, advocacy, assistive technology, digital divide... "Every university should be availed the opportunity to have a universal design for learning model classroom as a resource for educational access for students with disabilities. Participants of this conference breakout session will take a simulated tour of the UDLab with an opportunity to explore a selection of devices and application software that will be set up in stations for rotation to experience high and low assistive technology. A presentation of Virtual Reality Learning (Ludlow, 2015) will be shared to support diverse learning styles. Goggles, headsets and iPod Touch technology will provide virtual reality experiences for participants. Participants will learn how to enhance student success with Assistive Technology tools and strategies to support personalized learning. The session is designed to support teachers in promoting equity, opportunity and inclusion of all learners across the P-20 trajectory.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Empowering Family-Professional Partnerships Through Cultural Reciprocity
Limited Capacity seats available

Professionals who strive to collaborate with families, particularly those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, are encouraged to ask: "How can I go beyond cultural awareness to be truly culturally responsive in my practice with families?" In this question, there is a realization that professionals need to go beyond mere recognition of differences in language, race, ethnicity, communication styles (i.e., overt and covert level of awareness) to a recognition of differences in values, belief, principles, etc. that defines who we are (i.e., subtle level of awareness). This presentation will share how professionals can use "a posture of cultural reciprocity" (Kalyanpur & Harry, 2012) to explore these subtle cultural differences to become more responsive, collaborative partners with individuals who have disabilities and their families. This "posture of cultural reciprocity" approach involves: 1) identifying the cultural values, beliefs and/or assumptions embedded in one's interpretation of an individual's disability, in one's particular recommendation(s) for services/practice, in one's interactions with a family, other professionals, etc.; 2) finding out whether the family recognizes and holds the same beliefs, values and/or assumptions. If not, finding out how their views differ; 3) acknowledging and explicitly respecting any cultural differences identified and fully explaining the cultural basis for one's professional beliefs/assumptions; and 4) through discussion and collaboration, determining the most effective way to adapt one's professional interpretations or recommendations to the value system of the family. During the presentation, participants who are professionals will be asked to think of a situation or interaction with a family/parent when they recommended a particular course of action or had a particular priority or vision for a student/consumer. Participants who are parents/family members will be asked to think of a particular course of action or a particular priority or vision that they had for their child/family member with a disability. Then each participant will use a personal identity web to help articulate aspects of their own identity/ affiliations (e.g., nationality/culture, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, religion, exceptionality/ non-exceptionality, professional education, etc.) that may contribute to values and beliefs underlying their recommendations, priorities, and/or vision and to share these with another participant. The purpose of this activity is to assist family members and professionals to envision how this process can empower their partnerships. Finally, we will brainstorm possible barriers to the implementation of this "posture of cultural reciprocity" for both professionals and families as well as possible ways to overcome these barriers for each step of the process/approach. Kalyanpur, M. & Harry, B. (2012). Cultural reciprocity in special education: Building family-professional relationships.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Firsthand College Experiences from Young Adults with Intellectual Disability and Natural Supports
Limited Capacity seats available

This interactive session full of personal stories will provide participants with: (a) national snapshot of postsecondary program options for individuals with intellectual disability); (b) a brief overview of program components for one model demonstration postsecondary program in North Carolina; and (c) first hand college experiences directly shared from individual students and natural supports participating in the postsecondary education program. All audience members are welcome to attend. The presentation relates specifically to the 2017 TASH conference theme as it highlights truly inclusive community practices while celebrating human rights in a college community that embraces inclusion.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Healthy Relationships and Abuse Prevention for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Healthy relationship education is a widely accepted primary intervention for preventing abuse (Foshee et al., 2004; Wolfe et al., 2009). For people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), it is particularly significant due to their much higher risk for experiencing abuse than those without disabilities (e.g., Brownridge, 2006; Cohen, Forte, Du Mont, Hyman, & Romans, 2006; Coker, Smith, & Fadden, 2005; Sedlak et al., 2010; Sobsey, 1994; VanCleave & Davis, 2006; ). This session will review the Leadership for Empowerment and Abuse Prevention (LEAP) curriculum created by the Partnership for People with Disabilities at Virginia Commonwealth University in collaboration with people with I/DD. The key components of the curriculum, the training model implemented, and the evaluation tools developed will be discussed in the presentation. LEAP is a four module training series that teaches people with IDD about abuse prevention. The LEAP curriculum involved people with IDD from its creation to its training implementation. Over 500 people with IDD have been trained in Virginia. Video-based evaluation tools have been developed and implemented to evaluate the curriculum. Virginia's DD agency is interested in integrating LEAP in the service delivery system. Abuse prevention strategies for individuals with IDD includes access to education and training so that individuals feel equipped with the knowledge to make healthy decisions. Providing healthy relationship training for people with IDD is an essential tool to allow their voices to be heard. Providing evidence to evaluate if the training curriculum was effectively communicated and understood by participants is essential to empowering people with IDD to foster healthy relationships in the community. Abuse prevention and relationship education curriculum should meet the needs of people with IDD to provide them with the best possible tools to become self-advocates in their relationships and communities.

Speakers
avatar for Jack Brandt

Jack Brandt

Disability Policy Specialist, Partnership for People with Disabilities at VCU
Jack Brandt is the Disability Policy Specialist for the Partnership for People with Disabilities at Virginia Commonwealth University, a position he has held since 2010. Mr. Brandt was a Disability Rights Advocate at the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy from 2008 to 20... Read More →
AD

Allison D'Aguilar

Graduate Student, VCU
I am a trainer for the Leadership and Empowerment for Abuse Prevention project. | LEAP provides training to people with disabilities, by people with disabilities on healthy relationships and abuse prevention.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

How does it all work?: A Framework for Supporting Access to the General Curriculum in General Education Classes
Limited Capacity seats available

A grounded theory which explains the interrelated systems supporting access to the general curriculum in general education contexts for students with significant disabilities will be presented. Based on a multiple case study of secondary literacy classes, we report the individual and social processes in which teachers and teams engage to support students' access to general education content in general education classes. Participants will learn how to identify factors in their own schools or districts which might be influencing students' access to the general curriculum positively or negatively.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison`


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

How to Navigate the Criminal Justice System
Limited Capacity seats available

People with disabilities are disproportionately entangled in every aspect of the criminal justice system and face unique challenges as victims of crimes or as suspects of crimes with disabilities. Representatives from The Arc's National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD) will educate self-advocates and family members about what to do when they find themselves facing criminal justice involvement. Topics include: contacting community resources; an overview of NCCJD; the accommodations process under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); basic disability rights laws; and concrete tips and strategies for navigating the criminal justice system.

Speakers
avatar for Ariel Simms

Ariel Simms

Criminal Justice Attorney Fellow, The Arc
Ariel Simms is the criminal justice attorney fellow for The Arc's National Center on Criminal Justice & Disability (NCCJD). In this role, she advocates for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who become entangled in the criminal justice system as victims, susp... Read More →
avatar for TAYLOR WOODARD

TAYLOR WOODARD

Program Associate, National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability
Informed by her own experiences with a disability and driven by a passion to advocate for people with I/DD, Taylor Woodard left a lucrative position on Wall Street in 2010. Returning to her home state of Texas, she pursued dual-master’s degrees from The University of Texas-Aus... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Pathways to Careers: Making the Case for Employment First
Limited Capacity seats available

Pathways to Careers is a customized employment initiative that has been piloted in partnership with four nonprofit service provider agencies. Mathematica Policy Research has been collecting and evaluating data from the pilot sites, including looking at individual outcomes, impact, costs savings and replicability to understand the broader implications and sustainability of this customized employment approach. Findings from the evaluation indicate that the investment of resources and time needed to establish the infrastructure and provide more comprehensive services is resulting in significant societal benefits including quality employment outcomes for participants, cost savings at the Federal and state levels and increased community engagement. Join us for a more quantitative look at Employment First in practice.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

The NJC Communication Bill of Rights: Overcoming Myths That Limit Opportunity
Limited Capacity seats available

The National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of Persons with Severe Disabilities (NJC) NJC is made up of a representatives from eight member organizations (including TASH), and focuses on research, policy, practice, and education to advocate for individuals with significant communication support needs resulting from intellectual disability, that may coexist with autism, sensory and/or motor limitation. In 1992, the NJC published an original Communication Bill of Rights that was used widely to advocate for communication services and supports for persons with severe disabilities. In 2016, the NJC revised the Communication Bill of Rights to reflect of broader range of potential communication purposes and focus more on communication for the purposes of socialization, building relationships, and self-advocacy. The 2016 Communication Bill of Rights is based on the understanding that "All people with a disability of any extent or severity have a basic right to affect, through communication, the conditions of their existence. Beyond this general right, a number of specific communication rights should be ensured in all daily interactions and interventions involving persons who have severe disabilities. To participate fully in communication interactions, each person has [many] fundamental communication rights." In spite of these clearly articulated rights, myths regarding communication for persons with severe disabilities often limit access to communication and opportunities to learn to communicate. For example, it is commonly believed that individuals who were unable to learn reading, writing, and communication in childhood are unable to learn as adults. Yet, new technologies, instructional strategies, and contexts (daily activities and communication partners) have emerged since the time that today's adults were children. Learning is still very possible. In fact, a number of studies have shown that individuals with severe disabilities continue to develop communication and language skills well into their adult years and make measurable gains when provided with appropriate communication services. The purpose of this presentation is to review the NJC Communication Bill of Rights, the myths that limit opportunity to communicate and learn to communicate, and the research that contradicts myths. In doing so, this presentation links directly to the theme of the 2017 TASH conference, Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion, by providing participants with critical language and documentation they can use to support everyone's right to communicate.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

The Voices of Parents: Integrated Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Amid the many changes in one's life, the importance of family is constant and consistently critical across the lifespan. The expectations of families have a powerful influence on the success and employment outcomes of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). The employment rate for individuals with a cognitive disability in Tennessee is chronically low, with only 17.9% of working-age adults (age 16-64 years) employed (American Community Survey, 2014). In an effort toward expanding access to integrated, inclusive, equitable employment opportunities, it is important that we as a field understand the expectations, needs, and desires of parents and family members who often serve as a lifelong source of support for adults with IDD. Our presentation, entitled "The Voices of Parents: Perspectives on Integrated Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities," explores the expectations, preferences, concerns, and resource needs of 1,738 parents of adults with IDD related to various employment options (i.e., full- and part-time sheltered employment, full- and part-time integrated employment). We found that parents prioritized paid community employment over sheltered options and such expectations were strongly associated with the employment status of their child. Additionally, parents valued qualitative aspects of the workplace (e.g., personal satisfaction, social interaction opportunities) more highly than common employment outcome metrics (e.g., rate of pay, hours). We found multiple factors that shaped both parental expectations and the extent to which their children had been employed in the community, including disability type, disability severity, race/ethnicity, and gender. Most parents reported having limited familiarity with programs across every domain we asked about (e.g., residential, vocational, postsecondary). The extent to which parents indicated various types of information would be helpful varied by demographic factors (e.g., son or daughter's age, disability diagnosis, or socioeconomic status), as did avenues through which they indicated they were most likely to access information and resources. We offer recommendations aimed at equipping parents with relevant supports and resources to guide their son or daughter's journey across the life span. Our presentation will provide recommendations for research and practice aimed at raising expectations for and access to inclusive, equitable community employment for individuals with IDD.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Together Including Every Student (TIES)
Limited Capacity seats available

Together Including Every Student (TIES) promotes the participation of children and young adults who have developmental disabilities in extracurricular, recreational and community activities by creating effective natural support. Participants and their families have the opportunity to join any inclusive activity of their choice with the natural support of a peer. Each trained peer receives an individual support plan with strategies on how to best support the participant.

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Costello

Kathy Costello

TIES Program Director, Starbridge
Kathy Costello created Together Including Every Student (TIES) in 1997 in two school districts. TIES is currently in 45 school districts and communities. She is the parent of an adult who has a developmental disability. | Kathy also is Chairperson of Christopher's Challenge... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

The IEP is a Living Document
Limited Capacity seats available

Focusing on how to reframe the IEP as a tool for building authentic inclusive communities for students, this panel compiles the voices and perspectives from self-advocates, family members, educators, and researchers on how the IEP is more than mere compliance. And how, when developed strategically, it works to shift the focus away from procedural compliance to one of meaningful programming that builds inclusive lives for individuals.Based on a current issue of the TASH Connections magazine, “The Individualized Education Program as a living document”, this panel is comprised of the authors and editor. The panel will discuss what the IEP as a living document means and how to implement such a vision in your meeting or school. The information within this issue and panel may reignite the commitment to free appropriate public education by its encouragement of an inclusive community and authentic partnership and programming, using the IEP as a proactive tool, rather than seen as an object of mere compliance.

Learn more about the IEP as a living document in TASH's latest podcast episode with Amy Toson.

Moderators
AT

Amy Toson

Assistant Professor, Cardinal Stritch University

Speakers


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Research Symposium
Limited Capacity seats available

Agenda and overview coming soon!

Presentation descriptions below are in no particular order.

Teaching Safety Skills Needed for Community Living to Individuals with Developmental Disabilities (K. Kearney)
This research symposium will present findings from four different studies that focused on teaching safety skills to individuals with developmental disabilities. The session will end with discussion around safety skill acquisition and emergency preparedness instruction as a means to facilitate independent community living for adults with developmental disabilities. The four studies discussed will be: Using Modeling and Rehearsal to Teach Fire Safety to Children with Autism Teaching Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Safe Pedestrian Skills Using Video Modeling with In Situ Video Prompting Using Peer-Mediated Literacy-Based Behavioral Interventions to Increase First Aid Safety Skills in Students with Developmental Disabilities Using Total Task Chaining to Teach Adults with Developmental Disabilities to Perform CPR.

Educational Services for Students who are Deafblind: Filling in the Gaps (G. Francoeur-Anderson)
Dual sensory loss results in a unique disability that cannot be understood simply by adding up the effects of vision loss with the effects of hearing loss. Children who are deafblind have complex learning needs that cannot be appropriately addressed within special education programs solely for children with deafness or blindness. Teachers of the Visually Impaired, Teachers of the Deaf, and Orientation and Mobility Specialists are called upon to meet the unique needs of students who are deafblind. This presentation will explore how teachers and service providers meet the challenge of providing educational services to these students. It will review the findings from four different studies all of which examined how children who are deafblind are being educated. Current practices employed by the educators who work with students who are deafblind and their perceived needs when working with this population will be presented. The evaluation of the educational services provided to children who are deafblind is essential to ensuring an equitable education in an inclusive setting.

Finding Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion From State to State in Inclusive Post-Secondary Education (A. Licata)
* Developing Supports for Full Academic Inclusion of Students with Intellectual Disabilities in a Large University + To describe the process and outcomes associated with universally designed supports for students and faculty engaged in the KU Transition to Postsecondary Education (KU TPE) project. We will share preliminary results for supporting students with intellectual disability who are fully included in university coursework. *Enhancing Employment Outcomes through Inclusive Postsecondary Education + Numerous researchers report that employment outcomes for youth with ID are among the poorest of any disability group. We will describe the types of inclusive postsecondary services that are delivered to increase employment outcomes. Researchers will describe the intensity and variety of inclusive services such as internships in integrated settings that increase student outcomes. We will share on-line resources so others can replicate evidence based practices. *Inclusive Universe: Student Representation and Self-Advocacy in Inclusive Higher Education + The voices of students with disability are often marginalized in higher education research. This work aims to center the work of students with intellectual and developmental disability in inclusive higher education, creating space for self-representation around the college experience. *Measuring the Quality of Life in Inclusive Postsecondary Education + This work aims to show the change in one's perceived "Quality of Life" as a result of participation in an authentically inclusive postsecondary education program at Millersville University.

Measuring the Gap: State of Math Research and Practice in Severe Disabilities (J. Root)
The importance of high quality instruction for students with severe disabilities continues to be at the forefront of legislatures, researchers, practitioners, and parents (e.g., Endrew v. Douglas County). Consideration of the "school effects" of mathematics highlights the importance of access to the full general education curriculum, as unlike literacy, school is likely the only place individuals with severe disability will receive instruction in mathematics (Van de Walle et al., 2016). Intensive and systematic instruction is the key to equity, opportunity, and inclusion in the area of mathematics. It has been documented that students with severe disability can learn academic skills when provided high-quality instruction (e.g., Spooner, McKissick, & Knight, 2017). While the field's knowledge of effective practices is expanding as a result of an increased emphasis on academic learning for students with severe disability, the impact the evidence-based practice movement on teacher preparation, planning, and instruction in the area of mathematics for students with severe disability is unknown. Simply increasing research knowledge and hoping to see a corresponding increase in practice does not fulfill the promise of standards-based instruction for students with severe disability. This research symposium will present the current state of research and practice in mathematics instruction for students with severe disability.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Silvia Correa-Torres

Silvia Correa-Torres

Professor, University of Northern Colorado
avatar for Kelly Kearney

Kelly Kearney

Doctoral Student, Florida Atlantic University
People can talk to me about: | Inclusive education | Microenterprises | Puppies
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and tran... Read More →
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 4:10pm
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Access to Communication Brings Community, Comaraderie, Change and Curiosity
Limited Capacity seats available

Ian Nordling, Tom Pruyn, Huan Pham, Matthew Lager and other members of Growing Kids Therapy Center's "Tribe" are young adults with non-speaking autism who spell to communicate. This pack of close-knit friends meet frequently to learn, advocate and support each other. They'll share their life changing stories about how finally being able to communicate is allowing them to break down barriers. Their accomplishments the past year include: *Participation in college course with neurotypicals Gen Zers *Community Outreach *Local Government Advocacy *Partnership with local school *Presentation at community events *Deepened friendships and strengthened relationships with family There is much more work to be done and while these spellers face challenges everyday they are determined to keep pushing society to include them. They want to partner with others so they can continue to shatter the barriers and misconceptions facing those who spell to communicate.


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Count Me In! Overcoming Barriers to Inclusion for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This interactive skill-building session presents research-informed practices fundamental to successful integration and inclusion (membership, affiliation and equal opportunity) for students with autism and low incidence disabilities. Major barriers to the inclusion of these students within school settings and practical strategies for overcoming those barriers will be highlighted. Tactics that foster students' active engagement, positive performance, personal autonomy, and mutual participation WITH typical peers, within and across general education settings, will additionally be illustrated and discussed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Creating a Virginia Center for Inclusive Practices at Radford University
Limited Capacity seats available

We need your voice and your thoughts! We want to develop a Center for Inclusive Practices at Radford University to serve the Commonwealth of Virginia. As we study how best to go about this, we need to hear from a variety of people with a variety of perspectives. We hope to include general and special education teachers, parents of children with disabilities, youth with disabilities, adult advocates, like-minded university professionals and other stakeholders. This presentation will present the results of our interviews and surveys to date and use a variety of audience interactions to gather your input and advice.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Altieri

Elizabeth Altieri

Professor, Radford University
I am passionate about inclusion. I have been an advocate and supporter of Inclusive Education and Community since the 1970s and first joined TASH in 1979. I have teaching and administrative experience with inclusive programs for school-aged students and adults with disabilities d... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Exploring Independent Living Through the Lens of Individuals With Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Since deinstitutionalization in the 1970s, there has been a growing emphasis on independent living for people with disabilities. However, the concept of independent living remains ambiguous. For some, it represents a residential placement, but for others it represents a philosophy and movement toward equity, opportunity, and inclusion. As a philosophy and movement, scant research explores the perspectives of people with disabilities and how they define independent living. As a residential placement, current research indicates that independent living remains elusive for many youth and adults with disabilities. The National Longitudinal Transition Study-Wave 3 data indicate that 72.6% of youth with disabilities live with their parents after high school, only 9.9% live alone, and 0.5% live in a group home or assisted living facility (Test, Mazzotti et al., 2009). Adults experience similar outcomes, with 78% living with family members, 9% in group homes of six or fewer people and 7% in their own homes or apartments. Although the majority of individuals with disabilities live at home, those that live in small agency residences, with roommates, or on their own report higher levels of life satisfaction, improved financial outcomes, and more meaningful personal relationships. New approaches are needed to better understand how people with diverse abilities and backgrounds define independent living. Additionally, more information is needed on the types of supports, resources, and services they either currently use or require to live as independently as possible. One promising approach to facilitate these discussions is community conversations (Carter et al., 2009). Community conversations use the World Café model (Brown & Isaacs, 2005) to bring diverse stakeholders together to address barriers facing their community. Attendees generate innovative, solutions-focused ideas over a series of small and large-group conversations, and build relationships to support sustainable action after the event. This presentation focuses on "community conversations"€ as a practical approach to bringing together a diverse cross-section of people with disabilities to understand their independent living perspectives, needs, and experiences. We partnered with the Tennessee Center for Independent Living (CIL), Empower Tennessee, to host community conversations in five geographically and economically diverse communities in our state. We asked attendees to answer the following questions (a) What does independent living mean to you?, (b) What resources, supports, and services are you currently using to achieve your vision of independent living?, and (c) What resources, supports, and services do you need to achieve your vision of independent living? We also gathered participant demographic data, participant perspectives on the event, and participant satisfaction with current supports in a variety of domains of independent living (e.g., transportation, employment, housing, social relationships, spiritual life, self-care, political participation). We will share our findings from these five community conversation events as well as strategies stakeholders might adopt to identify and support the independent living goals of people with disabilities in their own communities.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer L. Bumble

Jennifer L. Bumble

Doctoral Student, Vanderbilt University
Jennifer Bumble, M.Ed. is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked as a special educator in Texas and an ESL educator in South Korea. Jennifer also worked as an educational consultant with the Vande... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Fiduciary Ownership as the Foundation of Independent Living for Adults with ID/DD
Limited Capacity seats available

Our presentation will review our program's process in assisting students with ID/DD to master their personal finances. This is seen as a major step in achieving and maintaining independent living. Additionally, students managing their finances successfully means they can integrate themselves into the community by sustaining their own housing and actively making their own purchases in the community. First we will address barriers that our students commonly face when they first begin to work towards managing their personal finances. This involves inexperience with money management, banking, budgeting and making purchases. Second, we will explain available resources offered by our program to assist our students. This includes budget classes, one-on one meetings, interactive budget workshops and real world practice in managing their money. Third, we will explain the natural consequences our students face when they do not manage their personal finances successfully and how this is an integral part of the learning process. Lastly, we will explain how successful personal finance management will lead our students towards their ultimate goal: becoming the primary managers of their money by becoming their own representative payee.

Speakers
avatar for Jasmin Rocha

Jasmin Rocha

Residential Coordinator, Wayfinders at Fresno State
My name is Jasmin Rocha and I am the residential coordinator for the Wayfinders Program at Fresno State. I am passionate about working with our post secondary students to learn the skills to lead independent and fulfilling lives. A special interest of mine is assisting our studen... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Getting Communication Going with Partner Assisted Auditory Scanning
Limited Capacity seats available

For individuals who struggle with traditional AAC access methodologies (direct selection, switch scanning, eye gaze, etc.), the strategy of Partner Assisted Auditory Scanning (PAAS) is often an overlooked access strategy that can have significant and immediate results for children and adults with complex communication needs. Using this strategy, individuals who otherwise struggle to communicate their opinions, thoughts and intelligence can be offered an opportunity to develop a full communication repertoire in just a single session. Too often, access training (the how of accessing AAC) and navigation/language system orientation (the organization of vocabulary in an AAC layout) are attempted to be taught simultaneously. With PAAS, children and adults with complex communication needs can focus first on communicating without needing to also struggle with the motor skills involved in accessing AAC. As presented by an SLP/AAC Specialist, this session will feature videos, case studies and opportunities for participants to practice partner assisted auditory scanning.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Inclusive Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities in Georgia through Collective Impact
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) programs on the campuses of colleges and universities is a growing movement in the education of young adults with intellectual disabilities. Making IPSE available to students in Georgia is at the forefront of the Georgia Inclusive Postsecondary Education Consortium's (GAIPSEC) efforts. This session will share how the partnerships between Georgia's UCEDDs, DD Council and VR have increased postsecondary options for students with ID in Georgia through the framework of collective impact. The Center for Leadership in Disability (CLD) has been the backbone organization. Along with the CLD, the DD Council, VR and other organizations shared a common agenda, collected data and measured results consistently, and participated in mutually reinforcing activities.


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Partnering in Student Success
Limited Capacity seats available

Partnering in Student Success - Through a partnership within and across agencies, the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) in conjunction with Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) are supporting students to be college and career ready. The implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) has been the stimulus for the transformation. With the expanded work, the Divisions for Special Education Services and Supports and Career, Technical and Agricultural Education have partnered with GVRA and Tools for Life to provide supports to students and their families.

Speakers
EJ

Elise James

Other Staff Position Not Listed, GADOE
avatar for Anne Ladd

Anne Ladd

Family Engagement Specialist, Georgia Department of Education
Anne Ladd is the Family Engagement Specialist for the Ga Department of Education, Division for Special Education Services and Supports. Previously, Ms. Ladd served as a Parent Mentor for Gwinnett County Public schools for 8 years. Ms. Ladd is a Graduate of the University of Geo... Read More →
WL

Wina Low

Coordinator - Special Education, Division for Special Education Services and Supports


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Preparing Professionals from Botswana, Africa to Teach Students with Significant Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, we will share the personnel preparation sessions conducted to share information with 12 special education teachers and two administrators from Botswana, Africa. The content included teaching students with severe disabilities functional skills, literacy, PBIS, communication skills, inclusion and early intervention. Strategies to work with international professionals will be shared. Perspectives on their view of inclusion and the education of students with severe disabilities will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Karena Cooper-Duffy

Karena Cooper-Duffy

Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Self-Determination in Leisure Activities
Limited Capacity seats available

The Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis is a not-for-profit organization that promotes and supports leisure opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. It is the belief of the Recreation Council that all people have the right to play and pursue their interests in their community, regardless of their ability and support needs. The Recreation Council provides information and referral services and funding to allow for self-determination and choice in their leisure aspirations.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Fleming

Susan Fleming

Executive Director, Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis
Susan Fleming serves as the Executive Director of the Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis, a not-for-profit organization that works to promote and support recreation opportunities for individuals with disabilities who reside in the Greater St. Louis area. Susan has worked i... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Community Living Committee Meeting
December meeting of the Community Living Committee

Moderators
avatar for Jenny Lengyel

Jenny Lengyel

Executive Director, Total Living Concept
I am a fun, passionate and friendly person. I believe in and fight for Social Justice and the rights of all human beings. I love to read and listen to country music.

Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Employment Committee Meeting
Agenda: Current Events, Capacity Building, Communications

Moderators
Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Supported Decision-Making
Limited Capacity seats available

Supported decision-making represents a fundamental shift in thinking about the best ways to support the independence, autonomy, dignity and self-determination of people with disabilities.  Learn about the successes and challenges of implementing supported decision-making as an alternative to Guardianship across disabilities.  Hear from family members, practitioners and advocates about a statewide collaboration, results of a national summit and a national parents survey.  Participants will recieve a copy of a soon to be published TASH newsletter on supported decision-making.


Moderators
avatar for Mark Friedman

Mark Friedman

Associate Professor, City University of New York (CUNY)
1. People with disabilities serving on boards of directors and policy making bodies. | 2. Online teaching. | 3. Disability Studies

Speakers
avatar for Dohn Hoyle

Dohn Hoyle

Director of Public Policy, The Arc Michigan
Dohn Hoyle is the currently the Director of Public Policy (formerly the Executive Director) of The Arc of Michigan and a long-time advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. A respected leader and innovator in the disability movement, Dohn helped to rewrite the Michigan... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Pearcy

Lauren Pearcy

Public Policy Director, TN Council on Developmental Disabilities


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

COME TO LIFE: PRIORITIZING WHAT MATTERS MOST
Limited Capacity seats available

Co-author of "Come to Life: Your Guide to Self-Discovery", Tom Iland will tell the story of his journey to becoming a self-advocate and describe why he left a career as a CPA to help people affected by autism and other disabilities full-time. This presentation also helps parents and professionals focus on key concepts and support the self-awareness, self-acceptance and self-advocacy skills of their children or students.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Creating the Change We Need: Leadership Training for Self-Advocates
Limited Capacity seats available

Project ACTION! is a successful established self-advocacy group in Washington, DC. Current leaders realized that there needed to be many more self-advocacy leaders if they were going to address all of the issues they hear about at meetings AND if they were going to create needed changes. Therefore, they developed a six-month leadership training program and recruited current and potential members interested in taking charge of their lives and making changes that are important to them. Some changes related to programs, services and systems. Other changes focused on relationships, attitudes of others, limited opportunities and not being treated with respect. Initial sessions focused on Finding Your Voice, Identifying Issues that are Important to You, and Taking Charge of Your Life. Later sessions focused on Running and Participating in Meetings, Serving on Boards, Talking So That People Will Listen, and the many roles played by self-advocates. Some of the training involved fun interactive role-playing, so that people could practice and learn in a safe non-threatening place. New self-advocates were paired with more experienced self-advocacy leaders, who could help them practice new skills and build their confidence. Project ACTION! has always wanted to mentor the next generation of self-advocates. These leadership academies were a great start in identifying and supporting younger self-advocates so that they can move into leadership positions. In this interactive session, self-advocates and supporters can learn approaches from each other.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Cultural Brokers: Catalyst for System Change to Improve Service Access for Culturally Linguistically Diverse Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Navigating the systems of care is so daunting that many families coming from culturally linguistically diverse (CLD) do not know where to turn. Cultural brokering model has become the best-practice in bridging the communication and cultural gaps in addressing the needs of CLD community. This interactive workshop will help participants learn about the implementation of the cultural brokering model at the Federation for Children with Special Needs in Boston, which is a house for one of the oldest Parent Training and Information Centers in the States.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Effects of Embedding Trials in a Shared Reading on the Behaviors of Students with Significant Cognitive Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

Teaching academic instruction to students with significant cognitive disabilities (SCD) has been done with success over the past years (Browder, Mims, Spooner, Ahlgrim-Delzell, & Lee, 2008; Hudson & Test, 2011; Mims, Hudson, & Browder, 2012). However, research is scarce and further instructional strategies are needed to help align the standard-based curriculum for this population of students (Browder, Ahlgrim-Delzell, Flowers, & Baker, 2012). The academic inclusion of students with SCD has been a topic of interest for researchers over the past few decades. In 1997, research on teaching academics to students with SCD was scarce (Nietupski, Hamre-Nietupski, Curtin, Shrikanth, 1997). The individuals with disabilities act (IDEA) was reauthorized in 1997, to require that all students with disabilities to have access to the general curriculum (IDEA, 1997). In 2001, No Child Left Behind was passed (NCLB, 2001), which made sure that all students are successful and held the schools accountable for the success of all students. These movements have prompted many researchers to investigate different instructional strategies to deliver instruction better and more specifically, academic instruction such as reading (Browder, Wakeman, Spooner, Ahlgrim-Delzell, & Algozzine, 2005), math (Browder, Spooner, Ahlgrim-Delzell, Harris, & Wakeman,, 2007), and science (Courtade, Spooner, & Browder, 2007) to students with SCD. With the passing of Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA, 2015), the importance of teaching academic instruction to students with SCD is still eminent. Based on the findings from the research, systematic prompting (Mims, Hudson, & Browder, 2012) and embedded instruction (Jimenez & Kamei, 2015) have been used as effective instructional strategies for students with SCD. The research also strongly suggests the use of shared stories to deliver academic instruction to students with SCD is also very effective (Hudson, et al., 2015; Mims, et al., 2012; Spooner et al. 2014). This study will add to the research by using systematic prompting to teach pivotal skills embedded in an adapted literature shared reading book, to examine the effects of this intervention on the acquisition of skills, listening comprehension, and behaviors of students with SCD. It is expected that this study will provide further support to the existing literature, and also provide another instructional strategy for teachers to use when working with students with SCD. A single subject multiple probe baseline design across participants will be used examine the occurrence of a functional relationship between the independent and each of the dependent variables. The results of the study will discuss the effects of the independent variable on three dependent variables: pivotal skill acquisition, listening comprehension, and behaviors of the students, as well as examine the effects of this intervention on the ability of the students to maintain and generalize the dependent variables over time and across settings. The social validity of this intervention will also be assessed through a survey send to the teachers, parents, and students.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Factors Associated with Successful Independent Community Living by Adults with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

While postsecondary programs for young adults with intellectual disability are becoming more common, many have not analyzed associated long-term factors that foster positive outcomes related to inclusive community living. This presentation will share community living survey results conducted with families of recent graduates of postsecondary education programs across 10 states. The session will highlight key aspects for creating and sustaining positive outcomes for independent and inclusive community living. The content relates specifically to the 2017 TASH conference theme as it highlights truly inclusive community living while honoring human rights that foster inclusion.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Five Strategies for Expanding and Generalizing Requesting Among Individuals With Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Teaching students with significant disabilities how to independently request can be a significant challenge for practitioners working with students who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This presentation outlines five strategies that practitioners can use to help students with complex communication needs generalize requesting behaviors across people, stimuli, and settings. These strategies are presented as a menu of options from which practitioners can pick and choose, including: (a) introducing and training others to use natural consequences, (b) using a variety of examples and teaching "loosely", (c) exposing students to variable access to requested items, (d) programing common items in the training area (e.g., classroom), and (e) providing a consistent communication system. When practitioners plan for generalization of requesting among their students, they can select one or more strategies from the menu to encourage their students' successful generalization of these communication requests.

Speakers
NA

Natalie Andzik

Assistant Professor, Northern Illinois University


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Outreach to Diverse Communities: How and Why
Limited Capacity seats available

In the over 65 years that The Arc has been in existence, our success has continually been our ability to understand and meet the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. In that time, not only has The Arc grown into a network of over 650 chapters across the country, but has also grown in terms of how we react and remain flexible in the environment we live, work and advocate in. As the diversity of the population of the country shifts and changes, so to do the people who need our support. As the workforce we need to effectively meet the needs of people with I/DD and their families becomes increasingly diverse, so to must our chapters become more adept at recognizing that diversity is everywhere (in their clients, communities and chapters); it is inevitable and it is beneficial. This session will explore not only why chapters need to develop an effective community outreach strategy, but also present tools and resources for broadening outreach and achieving inclusion. We will explore the concept of intersectionality as it relates to our chapters and our staff recognizing everything a person is. Best practices from chapters and/or other organization will also be offered.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn Cooper

Dawn Cooper

Manager of Diversity and Cultural Competency, The Arc
Dawn Cooper, Manager, Diversity and Cultural Competency at The Arc of the United States, is responsible for developing and implementing The Arc’s strategic plan for creating greater diversity within our chapters and ensuring we are effectively meeting the needs of a diverse I/D... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Resource Mapping: A Tool for Achieving Employment Outcomes and Financial Goals
Limited Capacity seats available

Join National Disability Institute as we explore Resource Mapping and the impact it has to enhance employment outcomes for individuals and the community providers that support them. Resource mapping offers a strategy that can help organizations view the larger picture of supports and resources that are available to help individuals improve their employment and financial outcomes. Rather than programs and resources being isolated from one another, mapping allows us to work holistically with other community resources to assist individuals in meeting their goals. This session will define resource mapping, provide tools so you can complete a resource map for your area, and identify key resources to include in your local resource map that will support equity and opportunities for people to meet their financial and career goals.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Striving to Ensure Real Homes for People with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Real Inclusion in Community Living begins with having a Real Home. Almost twenty years after the United States Supreme Court's decision in Olmstead v. L.C., people with disabilities continue to strive towards equal rights and opportunities, including the right to a home in the most integrated setting appropriate to one's needs. This interactive discussion will focus on what makes a real home. It will provide an overview of the challenges people with disabilities face in transitioning from institutionalized settings to the community. Self-advocates will share their experiences of conducting a housing search, provide information about housing rights for people with disabilities, and discuss self-advocacy housing search tips and strategies. The presentation will provide you with what you need to know to find a real home to rent or own and how to self-advocate for housing.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Kegley

Julie Kegley

Senior Staff Attorney/Program Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
avatar for Cheri Mitchell

Cheri Mitchell

advocate/ member, GA ADvocacy Office/ People First of GA
Cheri Mitchell is first and foremost a Self-Advocate. She has spent the last twenty years working on behalf of people with disabilities and people who are elderly, and mentoring and supporting self-advocates across Georgia and the nation. She is dedicated to helping people get ou... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Supporting Access to Science and Social Studies Using Content Modules
Limited Capacity seats available

Developing a framework to understand the progress of students with complex learning needs in the context of learning is an essential component of a balanced and relevant curriculum and instruction system. Such a framework requires the explication and communication of clear grade-level targets for learning. The development of materials to support such a framework was undertaken by the Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE), edCount LLC, and ETS. The resulting Science and Social Studies Content Modules support educators in providing grade-level instruction to students with significant disabilities, addressing their complex learning needs, and promoting inclusion. In addition, the modules are aligned to general education standards allowing the flexibility for use as a resource in any setting determined to be the student's least restrictive environment (LRE). The content modules were developed on a subset of the Tennessee Academic Standards for all students, focusing on the standards assessed by the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program Alternate (TCAP/Alt) in Science and Social Studies. In addition to providing high level information on the content of the academic standards, the modules provide information on making connections across standards, Evidenced-Based Practices (EBP) for teaching key vocabulary, suggestions for incorporating Universal Design for Learning (UDL), strategies for developing tactile maps and graphics, and ideas for transferring and generalizing concepts, knowledge, and skills to future school, community and work environments. The Science and Social Studies modules include information unique to each content. The Science modules provide information on including eight practices for learning science and engineering as described in A Framework for K-12 Science Education (2012). The Social Studies modules provide information on grade-band concepts and vocabulary grouped by learning progression areas (e.g., physical and human geography). The presenters will discuss the primary goal of the content modules ‒ to facilitate access to the Tennessee Science and Social Studies Academic Standards through rigorous instruction of students with significant disabilities alongside of same age peers. State leadership will share perspectives and insights regarding 1) the connections across curriculum, instruction, and assessment; 2) supporting educators and building capacity; and 3) plans for professional development to ensure the teachers and instructional leaders for this population of students have the knowledge and skills needed to support students'€™ academic progress in inclusive classrooms. The objectives of this presentation align with the 2017 TASH Conference theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion,"€ by highlighting the impact of providing high-quality, standards-aligned, and accessible content modules for educators of Tennessee students with significant cognitive disabilities. Through the development and implementation of these content modules, the TDOE has discovered a means by which to ensure classrooms are places where students with disabilities learn, experience meaningful participation, and develop a sense of belonging.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Jean Clayton

Jean Clayton

associate, edCount LLC
Jean Clayton is a retired teacher with over 20 years experience in working with students with significant cognitive disabilities. She spent most of the last half of her teaching career supporting students in fully inclusive settings. She currently works at edCount LLC supporting... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Using TED Talks to Empower Future Teachers to Become Advocates for Individuals with Emotional/Mental Health Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will demonstrate a strategy for empowering future teachers to become advocates for individuals with emotional/mental health challenges. Those of us diagnosed with emotional/mental health disabilities often face stigma and are pushed to the margins of K-12 classrooms. By using TED Talks that present first-person narratives from individuals with emotional/mental health challenges, a university instructor with personal experience with mental health disabilities was able to empower future teachers to become advocates for students who most need it. This presentation presents a step-by-step overview of the process and highlights key resources.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

What's the Story? - Listening Deeply to Measure the Value of What You Do
Limited Capacity seats available

This session is designed to explore the concept of storytelling as an evaluation tool. We will convene a storytelling circle and facilitate conversation that supports both the teller and the listener to learn new ways to measure their effectiveness as service providers. Storytellers will be coached to tell the story of what works or what doesn't work in their services.

Speakers
avatar for Shelley Nessman

Shelley Nessman

Consultant, In the Company of Others


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Early Career Research Network Meeting
Early career researcher network business meeting and social hour.

Moderators
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison`
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education, Illinois State University
Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Illinois State University. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with low incidence disabilities in Atlanta, Georgia before attending the University of Virginia where she worked on several federally funded grants involving research in the areas of multi-tiered models of positive behavioral interventions and support and teacher preparation in the area of low incidence disabilities. Building upon this work, Dr... Read More →

Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Agency Transformation
Limited Capacity seats available

Details coming soon!

Speakers
avatar for Gail Fanjoy

Gail Fanjoy

CEO, KFI
avatar for Michael Kendrick

Michael Kendrick

Director, Kendrick Consulting Intl
I have been very involved in person centered approaches that result in enriched lives for the person who is the focus. This interest has led to many associated questions such as values based leadership, defining and achieving quality outcomes, embedding people in valued roles in... Read More →
avatar for Hanns Meissner

Hanns Meissner

CEO, The Arc of Rensselaer County
Organizational Change and Development, Social Innovation, Systems Change, Person-Centered Work


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Easy as 1-2-3: Adapting Books for Students with Significant Support Needs including Visual Impairments
Limited Capacity seats available

Almost 35% of students registered with the American Printing House for the Blind are consistently labeled as non-readers. Non-readers are defined as those students who show no reading potential or who cannot be classified as either pre-readers or readers. Given the fact that students with visual impairments can read or demonstrate reading readiness using visual, tactual, and/or auditory means, it is difficult to accept the premise that one-third of this population is unable to show some degree of reading readiness or reading proficiency using one or more of the aforementioned modalities, especially since there are no specified grade-level expectations attached to these designations. A comparison of the APH Federal Quota Census data related to primary literacy modality across grade levels reveals that the percentage of students labeled as non-readers ranges between 20-29%. While the percentage of pre-readers decreases with age and the percentage of readers increases with age, the percentage of non-readers stays fairly consistent. When looking at reading classification by placement, 36% of students registered by state departments of education are labeled non-readers. Twenty percent of students registered by schools for the blind are classified as non-readers, and 15% of students registered by rehabilitation programs are categorized as non-readers. In comparison, 81% of those registered by programs specifically for students with multiple impairments are marked as non-readers. Unfortunately, this data seems to show that these students receive this label in infancy and that it follows them over the course of their entire academic career. This practice violates the least dangerous assumption principle, which stipulates that we should expect all students, no matter the severity of the impairment(s), to benefit from literacy activities and direct instruction and, therefore, to spend quality time involved in such activities. Students with significant disabilities can and do benefit from literacy instruction. Certainly, they can't benefit if they aren't provided access (Browder & Spooner, 2006, pp. 44-45). Thus, this presentation will share alternative strategies for providing meaningful literacy experiences to learners with significant visual and intellectual impairments, especially in relation to mainstream, age-appropriate literature. Techniques based off of Dr. Wormsley's I-M-ABLE approach for simplifying content, stimulating the development of vocabulary, promoting concept development, and facilitating comprehension will be shared. Strategies for effective use of adapted communication symbols, both tactile and visual, reinforced by auditory input will also be demonstrated. Particular emphasis will be given to cortical visual impairment when discussing visual adaptations. In addition, use of access technology, including alternative and augmentative communication devices, will be discussed. Finally, a sampling of low-tech and high-tech adapted books will be shown.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Groundtruthing Secondary Inclusion of Youth with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

There have been inspiring changes in curriculum and instruction for students with disabilities since the Education for all Handicapped Children Act of 1975. At the elementary level there has been increasing success at accessing the general curriculum and creating rich social relationships. If we were to take a reading of secondary inclusion what might it look like? What happens when we are forced to face the mystical business of building futures? Do we dismiss the principles of inclusion and fall back on the time worn life skills pedagogy in classrooms with stoves or should we move with confidence into the very heart of secondary culture? I would like to propose an open sharing of what contemporary secondary inclusion looks like and why it looks that way and what the future might offer. The discussion would explore these key navigational inquiries 1) Segregated settings which offer conservative functional curriculum create social and academic inequality. Is this countered by consistently successful transition outcomes. How successful are segregated secondary programs at creating good lives? 2) inclusive education has revealed that learning is continuous for us all. Does it still make sense to offer youth with disabilities a narrow curriculum of daily living or should we be offering the full menu of what secondary curriculum can provide? 3)In an effort to guide self determination in transition planning is it better to focus youth with disabilities into a career based curriculum or allow them to sample all of the curriculum choices that youth without disabilities experience. How do we best guide informed choice about personal futures? 4) Is it possible to embed functional skill training in general education environments or is there evidence that these skills are better taught in resource rooms? What is the better way to invite transfer and generalization after graduation? 5) A variety of social relationships are created by youth when they share space and time inside high school course work. Is there evidence that relationships between youth with and without disabilities are formed in inclusive secondary classrooms? Is there still an over reliance on educational assistants? Do the outcomes of community based instruction justify the loss of belonging in high school environments?

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Latino Community of Practice: Supporting Families with Children and Youth with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2015, The Center for Leadership in Disability, School of Public Health at Georgia State University set out to address the complex needs of the ever-growing Spanish-speaking communities in Georgia. Since, through the work of our Diversity Fellows, we have co-lead in convening diverse, multi-sector professionals, parent leaders and allies to address existing concerns. The Latino Community of Practice: Supporting Families with Children and Youth with Disabilities brings together over 125 consortium partners in metro Atlanta and beyond. And we have identified three areas of focus: 1) professional capacity building and collective impact; 2) education and leadership training for parents; and 3) formal and informal advocacy in public policy and systems of care.

Speakers
avatar for Brenda Liz Munoz

Brenda Liz Munoz

Appointed and Executive Council, GCDD, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities
I am interested in immigrant and new comer inclusion and integration in the state of Georgia and the southeast region.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Literary Arts Club: Creating Shared Experiences on a College Campus
Limited Capacity seats available

The confluence of several factors at a small, liberal arts university created the opportunity to develop a community-based literary arts club. First, undergraduate students are required to create and implement a service-learning project. Two second-year students, one an education major focused on becoming a special educator, the other a sociology major/communication sciences and disorder minor who wants to become an audiologist approached a special education professor about the possibility of creating a club to bring together college-age students with disabilities and college students. The concept of a book club emerged and a communication sciences and disorders professor joined the planning team. Together, we developed plans to implement the club and recruited participants from campus and the local school district transition program for students ages 18 - 21. Initially, the club started as a book club with an emphasis on reading a short story followed by discussion and an activity. The emphasis morphed into a literary arts club with reading, writing, and other activities. The team selected the reading materials with input from everyone and planned all of the meetings and activities. The college students and professors took turns leading the club. We read, wrote poems, wrote short stories, kept journals, and engaged in many discussions on the day's topic. For example, one meeting involved creating a black-out poem from a short-story selection. Another meeting focused on using picture prompts to create short, 25-word stories. We met weekly for an hour during the academic semesters in the college student union. Participants could purchase coffee and snacks from the coffee shop. We gathered around a large table or on comfortable chairs. In this manner a community was established in which everyone looked forward to our time together. Everyone participated and shared. The presentation will include a summary of the steps taken to establish the club, highlights of the activities we have done for the past 2 years, individual perspectives on their participation in the club, and suggestions on how to create a similar club. This presentation connects with TASH's theme for the 2017 Conference "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion"€ on several levels. When persons with disabilities leave school after graduation or enter a transition program, they often lose contact with same-age peers. The opportunity to connect with same-age peers on a college campus creates a social outlet that allows for relationships to develop. College students often have a strong desire to engage in social justice and give tremendous energy towards the rights of others. This was certainly the case for the two students who proposed creating this club. University professors act as mentors along with providing a service to the community and engaging in their chosen profession. There is nothing more gratifying than seeing the convergence of student, teacher, and community towards a positive outcome that benefits everyone. Thus is the case with Literary Arts Club. We all benefited -- professor, student, and community member. By sharing our story and experiences we plan to let others know that it is possible and enjoyable to come together under the guise of literary arts, a road not always taken.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Navigating Through Life with Positive Relationships
Limited Capacity seats available

Sharing of two separate lives that joined together in friendship in 2012. Using the process of person-centered planning to navigate the many dimensions of adulthood. Together they helped each other with decision making through the years. The friendship carries across all areas from Circle of Support, to conferences, and moving from employment. Finding Life long Friendship College Social Experience Employment options in higher education.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Simple PPT and Picture Adaptations for Engaged Inclusion in High School English Novel Units
Limited Capacity seats available

Two high school special education teachers and their university mentor will describe how PPTs and simple picture adaptations along with powerful collaboration and co-teaching strategies were used to meaningful include students with complex disabilities in high school novel units. Be prepared to truly understand the plot of Macbeth!

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Altieri

Elizabeth Altieri

Professor, Radford University
I am passionate about inclusion. I have been an advocate and supporter of Inclusive Education and Community since the 1970s and first joined TASH in 1979. I have teaching and administrative experience with inclusive programs for school-aged students and adults with disabilities d... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Strategies for Successful Inclusive Education
Limited Capacity seats available

A collaborative approach and not an adversarial approach goes a long way for successful inclusive education for students with needs that are atypical. It is critical for parents and self advocates to partner with and get buy in and cooperation from the school - teachers, therapists, administrators and even building staff and support people in order for a student to be successful. Relationship building with school goes a long way in the success and is contagious. Various strategies can help a parent or a self advocate to slowly build the relationship, build trust and get on to a path of success.

Speakers
avatar for Animesh Shah

Animesh Shah

Parent/Advocate


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Teen Jobseeker + School + Community + Family + VR + Employer + Medicaid + = Kyle's Dream Job
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will follow the success of a student with the most complex support needs who is accessing integrated employment experience. His family knew it was critical to focus on real employment skill development at an early age. Kyle McGee began his process toward paid employment at 16 years old and a rising Junior at Oak Mountain High School in a suburb of Birmingham, AL. Kyle uses a motorized wheelchair and an augmentative communication device. He has an intellectual disability and has behaviors that are barriers to employment. A family community relationship with a local health and wellness center led to an opportunity for Kyle to have an extended internship. With the help of a transition specialist, the family, Kyle, and the IEP team established the internship to fulfill important transition goals. The internship was implemented with the partnership of an expert in customized employment, augmentative communication, behavior supports, and school system support staff. The internship fits Kyle's interests and strengths. This presentation will demonstrate how it is possible to implement Employment First policies to allow success in employment for everyone.

Speakers
VM

Veronica McGee

I am a parent of a son born with congenital hydrocephalus. Kyle is 17 and is nonverbal and uses both a manual and power chair. I am here with my very good friend and advocate, Susan Ellis. She educated, supported and brought so much clarity to our ongoing journey with Kyle's p... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

The Emotional Classroom: The Importance of Teaching Kids to Manage their Emotions
Limited Capacity seats available

Schools are faced with a growing population of students who have difficulty managing their behaviors. Many of these students are diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder or other specific disability such as ADHD or Nonverbal Learning Disorder. Historically, these students have been a challenge to educators as their behaviors often overshadow their otherwise strong cognitive skills. Behavioral interventions have frequently proven ineffective as they don't show progress across settings or appear to last. However, new compelling research showing deficits in the areas of the brain that control and regulate emotions is poised to shake up the education world and lead the way for new and more targeted interventions. A comprehensive review of the existing new research will be discussed. The research will underscore the need for new methods and will support a change in the way we support kids with Autism and other related disabilities. Using research and our own extensive work with students, we have developed a program to teach emotional regulation to students in the classroom to help them both learn and manage emotions. These students have historically spent hours each week in offices and alternative settings due to their behaviors. Tantrums, outbursts, aggression, and shutdowns are frequently seen with this population and are some of the markers of emotional dysregulation. These cognitively able students are now able to spend time in classrooms learning, instead of waiting for their turn to "process it out" in an office later, missing critical time on learning. Supporting students' with complex and significant behavioral needs is a critical educational right. This support is needed not just for education but for life.

Speakers
avatar for Lori Jackson

Lori Jackson

Co-Founder, The Connections Model
Lori Jackson is an educational psychologist who has extensive experience working with students and families with ASD and other global disabilities. She is the co-director of the Connections Program which serves public school students with spectrum disorders, emotional behavioral... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

The Power of Peer Support
Limited Capacity seats available

Peer support is the basis of the work of Centers for independent Living Centers for Independent Living are cross disability, grass roots organizations, run by and for people with disabilities - peer support benefits both the provider and receiver of the support - peer support is diverse - peer support provides opportunities and support for more involvement in self-advocacy; self-determination; disability rights, civil rights and human rights; and "equality, opportunity and inclusion" - however, peer support is a "best kept secret" and is not known to enough people as the resource and effective tool it is. This session will share experiences, ideas, resources and information about peer support.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Georgia Advocacy Office (GAO) Briefing
Details coming soon!

Moderators
Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:29pm

About Poster Presentations
Poster Presentations capture information about a particular topic in the form of printed text and graphics. Poster presentations are displayed on 36" x 48" boards on easels. Poster presentations are shared during a two-hour period in a large room with other poster presentations.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:29pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Networking Reception
Join TASH during our Networking Reception to connect with other conference attendees, enjoy light snacks, and view our poster presentations!

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

A Collaborative Approach to Supporting Preschool Children in Inclusive Settings
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will highlight the multi-agency collaboration of the Denver Great Kids Head Start program to support children with a wide range of needs in inclusive preschool classrooms. The importance of effective early intervention for young children with disabilities and social-emotional challenges and their families is well documented. It is critical to provide quality supports and services for children in the early childhood settings utilizing research based practices for successful inclusion. Programs need to be supported by strong leadership, quality and meaningful professional development and access to ongoing behavioral and early childhood special education expertise. It is also critical that families are involved in all aspects of the child's program to build positive relationships with the staff as well as to support and nurture their young children at home. These efforts must be supported by ongoing collaborative and planning to address both the needs of young children but also classroom teaching staff. Denver's Great Kids Head Start is a multi-agency collaboration of the Mayor's Office for Education and Children, Denver Health (Early Childhood Mental Health Specialists), Sewell Child Development Center and Denver Public Schools to support approximately twelve hundred at-risk preschool children in six delegates. While Head Start mandates a minimum of 10% of these children are identified with special education needs, the agency serves a much higher number of children with developmental delays and significant emotional and mental health challenges. This session will highlight best practices in supporting inclusion of your children and supporting families in staff through examples of tools and processes that promote collaboration and development of classroom plans with individualizations for behavior and social emotional supports and address the unique needs of children with identified special education disabilities. Family partnerships and advocacy strategies as the children transition into Kindergarten will also be addressed. Participants will leave with a conceptual framework, best practice tools and strategies and successful family advocacy and transition ideas.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

A Literature Review of Studies Involving Paraprofessional-Implemented Systematic Instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this review was to summarize single-case intervention studies involving paraprofessional-implemented systematic instruction. Studies were synthesized to summarize participant and setting characteristics, intervention characteristics, and the quality of the studies. Intervention effect across study participants was calculated and moderator analyses were conducted to determine whether specific study characteristics influenced intervention outcomes. Implications for practice, limitations, and areas for future research will be addressed.

Speakers
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education, Illinois State University
Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Illinois State University. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with low incidence disabilities in Atlanta, Georgia before attending the University of Virginia where she worked on several federally funded grants involving research in the areas of multi-tiered models of positive behavioral interventions and support and teacher preparation in the area of low incidence disabilities. Building upon this work, Dr... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

A Regular Kindergarten Teachers' Difficulties & Support Needs in Teaching Children's Problem Behaviors
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study is to investigate regular kindergarten teachers' difficulties and support needs on their children's problem behaviors. For this purpose, five regular kindergarten teachers in Kyoungki Providence were participated, and one-to-one in depth interview with semi-structured questionnaire was used in this study. Collected interview data were analyzed by qualitative methods by coding constant comparative method. Results of this study are as follows. First, types of children's problem behaviors that teachers perceive in the classrooms included inappropriate behaviors to age, harmful behaviors to other people, and involuntary behaviors; children's problem behaviors that teachers usually experience were aggressive behaviors, use of harsh language, difficulties of basic daily living skills, disruptive behaviors during the class, inappropriate social skills, leaving the classroom inappropriately, and inattentive behaviors. Second, difficulties in teaching children's problem behaviors were maladaptation in early school days, relations with parents, management of classrooms, and instruction of peers caused by problem behaviors; instruction for problem behaviors included communication with peer teachers, collaboration with families, use of various instruction (such as token economy, reinforcement, praise, and discipline), guides of administrators and help of peers, help from related books, and professional's advice. Third, parent education and unbiased education, teacher education, support of parateachers or paraprofessionals, individualized education, and linkage were asked for effective instruction of problem behaviors. The results of this study have importance in that regular kindergarten teachers can provide effective ways when they intervene problem behaviors in the classrooms.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Addressing Health Literacy and Health Advocacy in Transition Aged Youth with ASD and ID
Limited Capacity seats available

This will be a presentation of a literature analysis that results in research questions and an action plan. The topics explored will be health literacy and health advocacy in young adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and health curricula for transition aged youth.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Affect of the ADA on Sports, Workplace, and Education
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation focuses on the affect that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has on sports, workplace, and education. The project highlights how the ADA has helped contribute to many successes, but also shows the many struggles that individuals with disabilities still face in the fields of sports, work, and school.

Speakers
avatar for Bailey Bihn

Bailey Bihn

I am a junior at Northern Arizona University. I am majoring in pre-physical therapy with a minor in disability studies.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

An Analysis of Parent/Guardian Components of Sex Ed Curriculums for Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Sexuality is a tough topic to address with all adolescents, but can be even more challenging with adolescents who also have an intellectual disability. When discussing barriers to teaching sex education to individuals with intellectual disabilities, service providers mention lack of time and lack of training, but also underscore the impact that the family members culture, beliefs, and involvement have on the process (Murphy et al., 2015). Family members are a very important resource when discussing sexuality, and one that is often overlooked or ignored. The focus tends to be more on instructional content (Eastgate et al., 2012), rather than the impact of who is delivering the information. A literature and curriculum review will be presented to explores parent and guardian involvement in sex education teaching and within sex education curricula. The review focuses on three key features: parents' perceived level of involvement, how sex education curricula involves parents (e.g. handouts or homework to be done at home), and the perceived role parents play in teaching sex education. Research gaps in these areas will be discussed. Additionally, the impact that this knowledge has on curricula implementation, and next steps for further understanding of family member involvement in the teaching of sex education to adolescents with intellectual disabilities will also be discussed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

AT for People with Sensory Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will cover the assistive technology available for people with sensory disabilities. We will discuss how to conduct a sensory assessment and then cover hardware and software that can be used to stimulate/soothe various senses.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Attitudes, Knowledge, and Utilization of Assistive Technology for Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Conversations with special education teacher candidates, cooperating teachers, and families identified the current attitudes, use, and knowledge of assistive technology devices for students with severe disabilities. All students were served in self-contained programs, however, the possibilities of more inclusive experiences with appropriate assistive technology devices were discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Craig Miner

Craig Miner

Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Availability and Quality of HIV Supports for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) framework was used to conduct a needs assessment of the availability and quality of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in the Atlanta metropolitan area. This poster will present the findings of the four phases of this research project. Findings from the research will inform organizations and policymakers on how to provide persons with disabilities better access to HIV/AIDS care and services. Although there is limited research about individuals with IDD and HIV/AIDS, recent reviews indicate that this subgroup is often at increased risk for HIV infection due to poverty, lack of adequate sexual health education, vulnerability to sexual exploitation and assault, and barriers to accessing needed services and supports (Aderemi, Pillay, & Esterhuizen, 2013; Groce, Trasi, & Yousafza 2008; Hanass-Hancock & Alli, 2014; Hanass-Hancock, Chappell, & Pretorius, 2014; Rohleder, 2010). This research is critical and is aligned with this conference's theme of "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion". This community-university research partnership focused on inclusion, empowerment and the need to highlight the voices of traditionally marginalized groups (i.e. individuals with IDD and people affected by HIV/AIDS.. This poster presentation is intended to educate others on how to successfully include people with IDD in evaluations that address significant disparities in supports and services that are might otherwise go unaddressed.

Speakers
avatar for Andy Roach

Andy Roach

Associate Professor/Associate Director, Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University
Andrew Roach, Ph.D. is Associate Director of the Center for Leadership in Disability (CLD)—a University Center for Excellence in Disability (UCEDD) at Georgia State University. He is an associate professor with joint appointments in the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services (College of Education) and the School of Public Health. Prior to returning to GSU in August 2013, he was an Associate Professor and Executive Director of the Collaborative Research and Evaluation Office (CREO) in Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. Dr. Roach is a former elementary and middle school teacher (9 years of classroom experience) and also coordinated family-centered positive behavior support services at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt University for 2 years. Dr. Roach’s research and scholarly writing focus on the design and implementation of inclusive educational programs and assessments for students with disabilities. In 2010, he received the Lightner Witmer Early Career Research Award from the American Psychological Association – Division 16 (School Psychology). Dr. Roach also received the Council for Exceptional Children’s Early Career Publication Award in 2007 for a study that examined the influence of access to the general curriculum on the assessment results of students with disabilities (Roach & Elliott, 2006... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Better Workforce Means Better Outcomes: Supporting Employment Consultants
Limited Capacity seats available

Given the discrepancies between the desires of people with IDD regarding employment and the reality, it is essential to bolster the work employment consultants do on a daily basis. The role of employment consultants requires research and attention to practice. The ThinkWork project, at the Institute for Community Inclusion, continues to explore the role and activities of employment consultants. Current projects have focused on both qualitative and quantitative input from employment consultants, which has informed the development of a comprehensive model of employment supports for job seekers with IDD.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Research Associate, University of Minnesota


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Brain-Computer Interface Technology: Communication Usability for People with Autism and Cerebral Palsy
Limited Capacity seats available

Augmentative and alternative communication (ACC) enables individuals to access communication, leading to more equitable opportunities and inclusion in schools and communities. This research study examines the usability of an emerging assistive technology, a brain-computer interface (BCI), for the purpose of communication among people with cerebral palsy (CP) and autism. BCIs are systems that "interpret brain activity directly, enabling communication and control by individuals with minimal or no reliable motor function" (Peters, et. al, 2015, p. 1). BCIs rely on brain activity to interact with a computer, rather than volitional motor control (Fried-Oken, Mooney, Peters, & Oken, 2015). Therefore, BCIs have the potential to serve as an ACC for people with complex communication challenges and motor difficulties. This presentation aligns with the 2017 conference theme by focusing on ACC as a method of inclusion for people with complex communication support needs. The research question guiding this study is: To what extent can individuals with varying levels of functional speech use the BCI to achieve AAC competencies? This study employed a single-subject experimental design to study "behavior change an individual exhibits as a result of some treatment" (Gay, Mills, & Airasian, 2012, p. 294). Ten participants (five with CP and five with autism) participated in a series of up to 14 sessions to learn to use a BCI called Think to Speak. Data collection with six participants is complete, one participant is currently underway, and three participants are scheduled in the summer. Preliminary data suggest that participants are able to learn to operate the BCI to generate a one-word response within the limited number of sessions, but not able to reliably generate appropriate responses between two or more different words. Results will discuss limitations to the BCI, as well as recommendations for future practice and research.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Character Strengths as a Facilitator of Successful Employment Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

Positive psychology -- the study, development, and application of activities to enhance positive emotions, psychological well-being, and optimal functioning - offers new insight toward understanding human behavior and aligning positive psychology theories and interventions to foster behavior change. Character strengths is one such theory. Character strengths offer a framework for understanding who we are at our core and how to leverage those strengths to improve outcomes in multiple areas of one's life. This presentation will review three ways character strengths can be facilitators of employment outcomes: 1) Build job seeker hope and self-efficacy through a deeper understanding of who the jobseeker is at their core. 2) Identify tangible strengths the jobseeker brings to a new job along with language to share those strengths in an interview. 3) Offer insight into which strengths the jobseeker is likely to rely on once they are on the job and ways in which the jobseeker, the job coach and other supports can explore using character strengths to be successful during the job search and on the job.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Community Perspectives: Advancing Post-Secondary Education for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) share the same post-school goals as their peers without disabilities to attend college, secure employment, and contribute to their community. Although legislation, policy initiatives, and improved transition service delivery have begun equipping students to achieve these goals, the transition outcomes for many students still fall short of their expectations. Data show that only 27% of youth with intellectual disability attend any type of post-secondary education program within two years of graduation (Newman et al., 2011). Students enrolled in these programs experience more inclusion in their communities and higher levels of employment. Graduates are 26% more likely to exit a vocational rehabilitation program with employment, and earn a 73% higher weekly income. Moreover, after participating in post-secondary education programs, youth report increased satisfaction across several domains including personal relationships, self-determination, and social inclusion (Migliore, Butterworth, & Hart, 2009). New approaches are needed to identify ways school systems, parents, youth with disabilities, and local campuses might work together to develop new and high-quality options for post-secondary education in their communities. One promising approach to facilitate these collaborations is community conversations (Carter et al., 2009). Community conversations use the World Café model (Brown & Isaacs, 2005) to bring diverse stakeholders together to address barriers facing their community. Attendees generate innovative, solutions-focused ideas over series of small and large-group conversations, and build relationships to support sustainable action after the event. This presentation focuses on "community conversations"€ as a practical and asset-based approach to support the development of post-secondary education programs. As part of our Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID) grant, we conducted a mixed methods study to learn how three geographically and economically diverse communities within one state might implement community conversations to launch efforts to develop new higher education options for local youth with IDD. Through this study we sought to understand: (a) effective strategies planning teams used to engage with local campuses; (b) attendee perspectives on what an inclusive program might look like on their campus; (c) attendee perceptions of the people, resources, or supports that would be critical for success, and (d) how planning teams used the ideas generated at their events to spur future action. We will share our findings from these three community conversation events as well as strategies that any stakeholder (including families, service providers, post-secondary educators, and people with disabilities) might use to begin conversations about higher education for youth with IDD in their community. References Brown, J. Isaacs, D. (2005). The World Café: Shaping our Futures Through Conversations that Matter. Barrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc: San Francisco. Carter, E. W., Owens, L., Swedeen, B., Trainor, A. A., Thompson, C., Ditchman, N., & Cole, O. (2009). Conversations that matter: Engaging communities to expand employment opportunities for youth with disabilities. Teaching Exceptional Children, 41, 38-46. Migliore, A., Butterworth, J., & Hart, D. (2009). Postsecondary education and employment outcomes for youth with intellectual disabilities. Think College. Newman, L., Wagner, M., Knokey, A.-M., Marder, C., Nagle, K., Shaver, D., Wei, X., with Cameto, R., Contreras, E., Ferguson, K., Greene, S., and Schwarting, M. (2011). The Post-High School Outcomes of Young Adults With Disabilities up to 8 Years After High School. A Report From the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) (NCSER 2011-3005). Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer L. Bumble

Jennifer L. Bumble

Doctoral Student, Vanderbilt University
Jennifer Bumble, M.Ed. is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked as a special educator in Texas and an ESL educator in South Korea. Jennifer also worked as an educational consultant with the Vande... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Comprehensive Reading Instruction: Evidence-based Practices to Support Literacy and Language in the Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will share a review of research on comprehensive reading instruction with students with significant disabilities. Findings will address intervention components, instructional methods, and outcomes. Recommendations for use of evidence-based literacy practices in the classroom will be discussed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Differentiated Instruction to Promote Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion for All Learners
Limited Capacity seats available

This session addresses the topic of inclusion with particular focus on how pre-service teachers can differentiate instruction to maximize equity, opportunity, and inclusion for all learners. Pre-service teachers conduct interviews with teachers in the field to determine how the teacher addresses individual learning differences, including individual student diversity (academic, cultural, and linguistic), areas of interests, and learning styles.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Effects of AAC Intervention for Children with Disabilities at Perlocutionary Language Stage
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an AAC intervention for children with severe and multiple disabilities at the perlocutionary stage. This study is relation to possibilities of AAC intervention for changing of communication stage of children at the perlocutionary stage. The participants of this study were three children using non-symbolic expression modes at the perlocutionary stage. The study design was a multiple prove baseline design across subjects. The intervention program was consisted in most-to least prompt system and play activities using sense of touch, auditory sense and kinesthetic sense. Clinical Implications will be discussed.

Speakers
KH

Kyung-Im Han

Professor, Changwon National University
Kyung-Im Han is a professor in the Department of Special Education, Changwon National University, South Korea. Her research interest is on physical disabilities, augmentative and alternative communication, grounded theory, subjective study and teaching strategies for students wit... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Effects of Positive Behavior Support for Class-Related Behaviors of Children with Cerebral Palsy
Limited Capacity seats available

Research findings of a empirical study will be presented in this session. This study investigated the effects of positive behavior support for class-related behaviors of children with cerebral palsy who had problem behaviors. Three kindergarten children with cerebral palsy participated in the study. A multiple baseline across subjects design were used to examine a functional relation between mediating strategy and class-related behaviors. Results of the study indicated that positive behavior support was effective in increasing attention concentration and instruction compliance of children with cerebral palsy and maintaining the increased behaviors. In addition, positive behavior support was effective in increasing on-task and peer collaboration behaviors. Also, limitations and suggestions for future research will be discussed.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Employment Skills in Motion: The Use of Video-Based Instruction to Promote Employment-Related Social Behaviors for High School Students with Severe Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation summarizes the effects of video-based instruction on the individualized employment-related social behaviors of five high school students with intellectual disability. For all students, the intervention increased target behaviors and sustained task engagement. Attendees will gain valuable information regarding social skills development and employment preparation within secondary schools.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Engaging Students with Disabilities through Robotics
Limited Capacity seats available

The author discusses the importance of engaging students with disabilities in informal STEM activities. The presentation will provide information about IDEA and IEPs as they relate to extracurricular activities. The author will present current research along with her personal experiences of coaching a team of students with autism to compete in a robotics competitions. Lastly, resources on how to start or join a robotics team will be provided.

Speakers
avatar for Karin Fisher

Karin Fisher

Assistant Professor, Georgia Southern University
I am a former high school teacher of students with disabilities and am now a professor for pre and inservice teachers. My research interests include increasing students with disabilities participation in STEM activities.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Evaluating Use of Skip Counting Number Lines and Dot Notation Math to Teach Multiplication to Students with ID
Limited Capacity seats available

Dot-notation math began as a strategy that used fixed reference points on numbers to facilitate counting and was later applied to addition, subtraction, money concepts and multiplication. Dot-notation is a strategy used by some to teach mathematical skills to students with disabilities. While studies have investigated effectiveness with addition and subtraction, experimental studies examining the effectiveness of dot-notation math to teach multiplication to students with disabilities have not been conducted. The importance of using effective evidence-based instructional strategies is crucial for learners with disabilities. Despite lack of applicable research support, dot-notation math is often used in school districts. This study was designed to extend the limited research on dot-notation math and to examine it's effectiveness in teaching multiplication skills. An ABABC design was used to examine the efficacy of dot-notation math to teach multiplication to four 7th and 8th grade middle school students with intellectual disabilities. Skip-counting skills are a prerequisite for dot notation multiplication and students were assessed and taught to skip-count using numberlines in a prebaseline condition. Subsequently, three conditions were implemented: baseline (A), intervention using skip-counting numberlines (B), and intervention teaching use of dot-notation math to solve single-digit multiplication problems (C). Intervention condition C was comprised of direct instruction, modeling use of dot-notation, and using least-to-most prompting to teach single-digit multiplication. Additionally, procedural and inter-rater reliability and social validity data were collected. Visual analysis was used to evaluate student performance during each condition and demonstrated that use of skip-counting numberlines were effective. However, student interviews indicated that students did not understand the concept of multiplication when using only numberlines. The addition of intervention condition C teaching dot-notation increased multiplication skills and student verbal behavior explaining multiplication concepts. Percent of nonoverlapping data provided a measure of effect size, indicating the effectiveness of skip-counting numberlines and dot-notation. It is important to note that in addition to being identified with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities, students were also identified with autism, ADHD, and other health impairments. One student was an English Language Learner. Students represented social economic status of low and middle-income families with two students on free/reduced lunch status. Students were ethnically diverse as well representing Hispanic/Latino, Asian, White and Native American groups of people. The study included two males and two females. This degree of diversity is important in that it helps to indicate the applicability of the procedures for a diverse group of students.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

How to Make Teacher Created Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Academics
Limited Capacity seats available

Providing high-quality special education services in rural settings has a variety of challenges such as geographic isolation and a lack of resources. One particularly challenging aspect of rural special education is a lack of highly trained personnel, especially when providing general curriculum access for students with autism. Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) is one way to provide high-quality specialized instruction that does not require the attention of another teacher nor a paraprofessional while still possessing the ability to implement research-based specially designed instruction with fidelity. These aspects make CAI a viable instructional strategy within inclusive settings that addresses frequent barriers for inclusion in the rural South. The purpose of this poster is to provide teachers with step-by-step instructions for how to create their own CAI programs that can be customized to meet their student's individual needs. The poster also provides specific examples and discusses considerations for teachers when creating their own CAI programs.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

I'm at the Center
Limited Capacity seats available

Growing up with an intellectual disability, we are often told what to do without being asked if that's something we want or even like. We wake up, and we're told what to wear. We go to school, and we're told what to learn. The weekend comes, and we're told what "fun" activity has been planned. Now, it's time for us to make our own decisions. We want to work and live on our own and this is the first step. We are going to explain and demonstrate how we plan, implement, and lead our person-centered planning meetings. First, we decide who we want to invite. We consider those who are important to us and those who have a positive impact on our lives. For some of us, that's teachers, parents, and siblings. For others, that's counselors, best friends, and co-workers. Then, we meet with our teachers and they help us develop a PowerPoint presentation that lays out are strengths, interests, short-term and long-term goals, and the support that we need to accomplish such goals. Most importantly, we are deciding our goals and identifying our needs rather than being told by someone else. We create introductions to start each meeting, so that we can inform people why we are meeting and allow everyone to introduce themselves. Once introductions are complete, we run through each slide and ask that our PCP team members add information and ask questions as we go along. We also discuss with the PCP team our progress toward reaching our goals. Being able to create and lead our own presentations about ourselves makes us feel more involved in our education. It makes us feel motivated and excited that we are getting to make our own choices, rather than someone else doing it for us.

Speakers
JL

Jesse Luca

Student, CrossingPoints - The University of Alabama
CS

Clay Stone

Teacher, CrossingPoints - The University of Alabama
PT

Paul Tinker

Student, CrossingPoints - The University of Alabama



Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

I.B.-long; Enhancing Meaningful Participation of Middle Grade Students with Disabilities in International Baccalaureate Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

The mission of International Baccalaureate programs within schools strives to develop student understanding of global citizenship traits. The Learner Profile aligned to these programs embraces community engagement through appreciation of culture, diversity, and respect for the self and others. With the notions of equity and inclusion underlying the very core of International-Baccalaureate design, it is unfortunate that students with disabilities are often the very ones isolated from participation within these programs. By leveraging evidence-based supports within shared academic settings, opportunities for inclusive service learning, and explicit character-strength instruction, stakeholders can ensure that students with disabilities take on meaningful roles within these internationally-focused programs, becoming valuable global citizens beside their peers and friends.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Improving Homework Completion Using Self-Management Strategies
Limited Capacity seats available

This poster describes a single case research study in which we taught a middle school student with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder to use self-management strategies to improve compliance with completing homework tasks. The study took place in the participant's home during the times that the family selected for homework completion. We taught the participant's mother to implement the intervention to increase sustainability. The session fits with the theme of the TASH conference, 'Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," because helping children with disabilities learn strategies to manage their own behavior increases their autonomy and makes it more likely they will be successful in school, community, and employment settings.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Inclusive Education Practices for Adolescents With Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review
Limited Capacity seats available

Effective supplemental aids and services are important to support and maintain the least restrictive environment for students with disabilities based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This review examined inclusive education interventions as the supplemental aids and services for adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). I identified 36 studies that (a) was conducted in USA; (b) included at least one student with ID attending a junior or senior high school; and (c) attempted to demonstrate the effects of inclusive education practices. Based on these studies, I classified the practices as six types including embedded instructions, self-management instructions, peer support arrangements, inquiry lessons, cooperative learning, and other peer-mediated instructions. Then, I discussed (a) participants' characteristics, (b) inclusive contexts (e.g., class subjects), (c) interventions procedures and outcomes, (d) intervention agents, and (e) the agent's training and/or qualification. I also discussed some variations of intervention procedures that different studies used for the same type of the practices.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Involvement and Participation of Students with Severe Disabilities in SWPBS
Limited Capacity seats available

With more schools implementing schoolwide positive behavior support (SWPBS) and achieving valued student outcomes associated with these efforts, the inclusion of students with extensive support needs must be considered. These students remain programmatically and physically separated from general education instruction and activities, suggesting their limited involvement in SWPBS. In this study, a survey of school-based SWPBS coaches was completed to assess the involvement of students with extensive support needs in a single state. Results suggest that students with ESN are involved in the incentive-based components of their school's SWPBS plan; however, there were differences among respondents in the reported existence of behavior plans and crisis intervention plans. Implications and recommendations for these findings are provided.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, NM. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, soc... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Involving Parents and Siblings: A Family Systems Approach to Increasing Communication Skills
Limited Capacity seats available

One common challenge for many families of children with disabilities is communication. In many cases the children may have complex communication needs (CCN), which result in significant delays in communication (APA, 2013; National Research Council, 2001). These communicative deficits may lead to impaired social functioning and interaction, and limited verbal skills for the child (Raghavendra, Virgo, Olsson, Connell, & Lane, 2011). Communication challenges may also cause family members, especially parents and siblings, to feel disconnected from the child with CCN. Furthermore, a lack of ability to effectively communicate, and understand communication, can add additional stress family members already feel when raising a child with a disability (Bailey, Parette, Stoner, Angell, & Carroll, 2006; van Ijzendoorn et al., 2007; Marshall & Goldbart, 2008). Family member support, particularly parents and siblings, is especially crucial in helping a child develop effective communication skills (Huttenlocher, Waterfall, Vasilyeva, Vevea, & Hedges, 2010; Siller & Sigman, 2002). This conference presentation will aim to summarize the findings of four research projects in which two family-centered strategies were used to increase the communication of a child with a disability. The first strategy is the POWR parent strategy, focused on helping parents learn how to increase their child's communication skills while playing or doing a fun activity. This strategy was examined across two multiple probe single-subject design studies, one with parents of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and another with parents of children with CCN and developmental disabilities. The second strategy is an adaptation of the POWR strategy created for siblings of a child with a disability. This strategy is titled Plan, Talk, Wait, Respond. This strategy was examine across two studies: one using a multiple probe single-subject design with siblings of a child with CCN, and a case study with increased emphasis on certain aspects of the strategy. In both strategies the family members are taught four main steps: 1) Plan a fun activity that fits the child's interested and culture ; 2) Offer opportunities for communication/talk with the child; 3) Wait for the child's response; and 4) Respond to the child each time they communicate to reward the social interaction. Multiple probe single-subject designs were used to study the impact and effectiveness of the trainings with both parents and siblings across families with young children with different disabilities and CCN. Study participants represented a diverse sample of families. Findings from the studies indicate that the training for both parents and siblings positively impacted child communication behaviors during play activities. General results from the studies will be presented. In addition to a summary of the results, implications for training multiple members of the child's household will be discussed. The usefulness and potential benefits of training multiple communication partners in a more naturalistic setting will be presented. It is important to help children with disabilities and CCN learn the necessary skills to communicate in the world around them. Communication is a social issue, and can have lasting effects. Parents and siblings are the individuals who are in the best position to help these children, but are often under-utilized. These are the individuals who are around the child every day, and have the most interactions and communications with them. Educating and coaching family members on how to implement the evidence-based POWR and Plan, Talk, Wait, Respond communication strategies can potentially have very long and lasting impacts on children with communication delays. Increasing the child's communication, and teaching those most connected to them to do so, is best-practice and will increase their ability to function in society as they continue to age.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Key Components When Training Paraeducators to Ensure Student Success
Limited Capacity seats available

According to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, a primary aim of special education services is to meet the diverse needs of students with disabilities; yet, there is a wide gap between research and practice in special education. Practitioners who are familiar with evidence-based practices may not implement them accurately nor will they train their staff how to implement them. Simply acquainting practitioners with lists of evidence-based practices does not ensure accurate and effective implementation. Research has demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral skills training (BST) as an instructional method with learners with significant disabilities. Given the current high-stakes climate of teacher accountability in education and the achievement gap between students with disabilities and their peers without disabilities, effective strategies are needed to equip special education teachers with skillful repertoires of evidence-based practices (EBPs). As paraeducators are taking on more critical roles among students with disabilities in the classroom, the availability of training and professional development opportunities for these professionals continues to be lacking. The purpose of our presentation is to demonstrate to teachers and other professionals a research-based strategy when taking dense information from professional development trainings and translates that to a simple and brief training for paraeducators. This will include several components including creating a task analysis (i.e., checklist) of critical components, modeling, role-play, and ongoing feedback/coaching. Researchers will demonstrate to the audience the key steps to implementing staff training in the classroom and will also provide the audience with an opportunity to practice this skill.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Korean Mothers of Children with Disabilities and their Experiences in the U.S.
Limited Capacity seats available

This study is to examine the extent to which Korean individuals with disabilities and their parents' attitudes and perceptions of disability have an impact on the children's transition to adulthood (including post-secondary education, employment, and independent living). It is a qualitative case study that will examine the current practices of transition for students with disabilities by listening to stories told by the participants and to gain a pragmatic understanding of the community-based transition service needs and give voices to those who may be disenfranchised or marginalized by society. Four families of individuals with disabilities will be interviewed for the case study. Data collection includes, interview, document analysis, and field observation.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Mindfulness on the Autism Spectrum
Limited Capacity seats available

Mindfulness has revolutionized intervention in fields such as psychology and it has greatly improved outcomes for individuals with mental health diagnoses. But how can mindfulness interventions benefit people with autism and complex support needs? This presentation will explore how mindfulness may be a useful tool for individuals with ASD by reviewing the literature on mindfulness and autism. This presentation aligns with this year's conference theme, Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion, by focusing on mindfulness which plays a role in self-determination theory (Deci, Ryan, Schulty & Niemiec, 2015). Mindfulness interventions can help people live more self-determined lives by increasing awareness and self-management. Mindfulness interventions have also enabled people with autism to self-manage challenging behavior which may increase opportunities for the development of meaningful relationships in inclusive settings.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

My Meeting, My Future
Limited Capacity seats available

As students with intellectual disabilities, our choices and futures are often made for us. We've been told what we want to eat, even if we didn't like it; what we should wear, even if we thought it was ugly; and what jobs we'd be best for, even if we had no interest. People have been carving our paths for us since we were children, but not anymore. It's time for us to carve our own paths. No longer are we going to sit through our IEP meetings and listen to our teachers and parents talk about us, but not engage us. We are going to explain and demonstrate how we lead our own IEP meetings and, ultimately, decide our own futures. First, we meet with our teachers, and they help us develop IEP presentations. To start, we write introductions, where we explain why we are meeting and ask people to introduce themselves to the meeting. After introductions, we run through our IEP presentation, which we complete using PowerPoint and Google Slides. We also have the options to bring work samples to show what we've been doing in school. Our presentations include all of the main and important parts to our IEP, such as our strengths, interests, needs, long-term goals, annual goals, and services. Most importantly, we identify what we need and what we want our goals to be. Our presentations align with the IEP document so IEP team members can easily follow along. After we present a slide, we ask that other team members add information or ask us questions if something needs cleared up. Having the opportunity to create our own IEP presentations and lead our own IEP meetings improves our self-determination and self-advocacy skills. It makes us feel important and more involved in our education. We are no longer sitting back and waiting on others. We are becoming independent.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

My Voice. My Participation. My Board: Leadership Training for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

With the growing power of the self-advocacy movement, community organizations are increasingly recognizing the importance and value of including individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) as full members of their governance boards and advisory councils. Many individuals with IDD have not had opportunities and experiences to prepare them for these roles. This presentation will focus on a newly developed program to address this need--My Voice. My Participation. My Board. The purpose of this presentation is to inform conference attendees about the impact of My Voice. My Participation. My Board (MVMPMB) training program on individuals with IDD and decision making boards and advisory councils. MVMPMB is a leadership training program for individuals with IDD who are interested in gaining specific skills to be more effective board of director and advisory council members.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Positive Behavior Support Parent Academies for Young Children with Challenging Behaviors
Limited Capacity seats available

The Positive Behavior Support Parent Academies were developed through a university-state department of health partnership to address persistent challenging behaviors in children between the ages of three and five with and without identified developmental disabilities. Sessions were conducted in public and private schools and community locations. Eight Parent Academy cohorts participated in five two-hour sessions designed to provide them with behavioral and visual supports strategies to understand, prevent, and replace their child's challenging behaviors and improve developmental outcomes. The curriculum employed a range of strategies to address the concerns that are often observed in children with learning, social, and communication delays. Within the five sessions of the Parent Academy, the content included an analysis of daily routines, an introduction to the fundamentals of behavior, and the development of a behavior intervention plan to address one behavior prioritized by the participants. Parents were also given complimentary visual supports kits, materials and resources to utilize in their home. Parents completed pre- and post-assessments of self-efficacy, parental stress, knowledge of positive behavior support strategies, and child problem behavior. Preliminary results suggested that parents were more confident about their ability manage their child's challenging behaviors. Parents also demonstrated increased knowledge of positive behavior supports tools and strategies. The poster will highlight the curriculum components including the didactic content as well as the activities used to facilitate caregiver engagement and peer interaction. The strategies used to facilitate the academies were unique in that the encouraged caregivers to identify family strengths as well as develop a supportive network amongst fellow cohort members. Project evaluation findings will also be presented. These quantitative and qualitative data will provide some insight to the effectiveness of the trainings and caregiver satisfaction with the training. This particular poster will focus on the Positive Behavior Support Parent Academies. These trainings presented a unique opportunity for caregivers because there had previously not been caregiver support and trainings for this age group. Additionally, this type of training had not been conducted in community settings for caregivers. The theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," is congruent with the vision of the parent academies in that two large agencies provided support on behalf of this underserved age range. The Department of Public Health and the Center for Leadership in Disability were able to identify funds to support these trainings for families whose children aged out of the Part C early intervention system, yet were not receiving services within the school system. Many of the families were in distress because their children's behavior was causing familial stress and some were pending expulsion from daycare providers.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Recent National Data on Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

Think College, the National Coordinating Center for the US Department of Education-funded Transition and Postsecondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disability (TPSID) programs will share findings from its recent evaluation of 44 TPSID programs located at US colleges and universities in 2015-16 as well as trend data over 6 years related to inclusive course access, career development, campus membership, credential attainment and employment outcomes at these programs. The Higher Education Opportunities Act of 2008 created grants for TPSID model demonstration projects, implemented between 2010 and 2015 at 57 colleges and universities and currently being implemented from 2015 to 2020 at 44 campuses in the U.S. The data presented in this session are from a large-scale survey study of the practices and effectiveness of inclusive higher education implemented by the 25 TPSID grantees in 2015-16. The evaluation protocol implemented by the TPSID NCC was reviewed and approved by the federal Office of Management and Budget. This web-based data collection effort reflects a uniform dataset for collection of program and student variables from the TPSID demonstration projects and their partner sites across the country. These data detail student demographics, enrollment, academic, social and employment engagement, as well as reflect programmatic infrastructure. The evaluation protocol was developed in alignment with the Think College Standards for Inclusive Higher Education (Grigal, Hart, & Weir, 2011). This dataset is currently the largest and most comprehensive source of information on inclusive higher education for students with ID. This session will be a poster presentation with two presenters. The poster will display a brief explanation of the TPSID model demonstration project and the role of the TPSID NCC in evaluating the TPSID projects will be provided, as well as a graphical and visual presentation of the primary findings from recent data. Specific data to be presented include inclusive course access, career development, campus membership, credential attainment and employment outcomes at these programs. In addition to the visual poster, the presentation will include two accompanying accessible handouts that further describe the findings from 2015-2016 data related to the students who are attending college and the practices of the colleges/universities involved. Higher education for students with intellectual disability (ID) has evolved from a strongly family- and self-advocate led grassroots effort to a national movement guided by legislation. Opportunities exist for students with significant support needs to attend college as a result of both grassroots and legislative advocacy and activism. These efforts are effecting change in higher education. Raising awareness of existing higher education opportunities and the benefits to students with ID that are gained through participation in these programs through this poster presentation allows for persons with ID, families, practitioners, and others to gain knowledge that will allow them to advocate for greater access to these opportunities. Assuring access to higher education to all is a social justice issue, and we must continue to share information and increase opportunity.

Speakers
avatar for Cate Weir

Cate Weir

Project Coordinator, Think College
inclusive postsecondary education for students with intellectual disabilities


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Seeking Best Ways to Document Whether and How Teacher Candidates Support Students Rising
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this poster presentation is to present findings from an interview study that explored what recent graduates and current teacher mentors associated with two inclusive teacher preparation programs would consider to be positive student outcomes as well as any associated positive mentor outcomes that result from teacher candidate participation in prek-12 classrooms -- in particular, outcomes beyond required state assessments that would indicate that students (with and without disabilities) in inclusive settings did "still rise."

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Seeking Employment in the Digital Age: Student Directed Websites
Limited Capacity seats available

As educators and professionals, we have a responsibility to create innovative solutions for students to communicate their accomplishments in a professional and contemporary approach to provide access to competitive and integrated employment. In this breakout session, we will explore how to create a dynamic website allowing students to document their journey through high school, employment and beyond. We will discuss the components, organization, and process of building an website portfolio to include: online resume, blog, video, file storage, social media, photos, etc. Students can utilize this tool as a way to communicate their accomplishments, strengths, support needs, and experiences. A self advocate will co-facilitate this presentation and share his personal experience with using his website to reinstate his rights.

Speakers
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Project Manager, Youth Employment Solutions Center / National TASH
avatar for Ahmad Rahman

Ahmad Rahman

Ahmad Rahman was born in Lahore, Pakistan and moved to the United States when he was 12 years old to gain access to a stronger education system. In 2016, he graduated from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) in Integrative Community Studies, a four-year certificate program that emphasizes higher education, self-determination, community inclusion, career development, and independent living. He then completed a one-year post-secondary certificate program at Alamance Community College with a focus on Health and Public Services. Ahmad has work experience in numerous internship and employment opportunities including the UNCG School of Education, Triangle Orthodontics, and Rahman... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Self-determination in Health Care at School
Limited Capacity seats available

Data presented in this research presentation is part of a larger multiple case study that examined beliefs about and the involvement of students with intellectual disabilities and complex health care needs in their specialized health care at school. Nine cases were studied that included the following participants: focus students with intellectual disabilities and complex health care needs and their respective parents, special education teachers, school nurses, and 1:1 nurses or paraprofessionals. This research presentation is focused on findings specific to self-determination in health care at school. These findings were (a) students can realize self-determination in their health care through partial participation in their specialized health care procedures, self-reporting health issues, and making choices (b) school personnel and parents valued student self-determination in health care but were unsure how to teach and/or support self-determination in students with the most complex support needs; (c) students who demonstrated self-determination in their heath care were perceived and observed to safeguard their own health, exhibit self-confidence in their health care, and positive social-emotional adjustment to their health care needs; and (d) self-determination in health care at school was perceived to be associated with improved quality of life and adult outcomes for students, as well as decreased caregiver responsibilities and stress reported by parents. This presentation connects with the TASH theme because self-determination in health care is essential to resiliency in this population, who generally requires continuous and intensive direct health supports and medical technologies. Self-determination in health care, including self-care and health advocacy, enables individuals with disabilities to realize their basic human rights to exercise control over their bodies, be independent, and experience quality of life across their lifespan in inclusive settings.

Speakers
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Service Dogs for 100 Please
Limited Capacity seats available

The term "service dog" is often used as a generic label including service dogs for people with disabilities, emotional support dogs, psychiatric service dogs, seizure or diabetic alert dogs and therapy dogs. A service dog is defined under ADA as a dog trained to perform a task for a person with a disability that he or she could not perform for themselves and that makes the disability less severe, serious, or painful. Service dogs are granted specific access and legal rights under ADA. Other types of specially trained dogs included under the generic "service dog" category may or may not be entitled to ADA protection and access depending on the type of duties they perform and the nature of their training. Additionally, the abuse of "service dog" designation from online sources has further complicated the issue, especially for individuals with invisible disabilities. This confusion and abuse regarding "service dog" status has caused people with disabilities to be denied access and support, while individuals without disabilities can take advantage of service dog status to gain access for untrained dogs. This situation has resulted in denial of rights for people with disabilities, a potential misperception of the purpose of service dogs, and the potential for unsafe situations for both dogs and people when they encounter untrained "service dogs" in public situations who are not properly trained to handle the complexities of community access. The purpose of this presentation is to provide information on the ADA definition of service dogs and define the purpose, training, and legal access granted to other types of assistance dogs often included in the "Service Dog" category.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Steps that Lead to a Degree
Limited Capacity seats available

As a self-advocate who is an undergraduate student enrolled at Georgia State University, I would like to share proper avenues and steps that one with an IEP can master to get into college and earn a degree.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Strategies for Success for Dually Classified Students
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will include a discussion and visual representation of research based strategies that benefit individuals who are both diagnosed with severe developmental disabilities and are English Language Learners (ELLs).

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Comparison of the Characteristics between the Employed and the Unemployed...
Limited Capacity seats available

Full Presentation Title: The Comparison of the Characteristics between the Employed and the Unemployed among the High School Graduates with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in South Korea
The purpose of the present study is to compare the characteristics between the employed and the unemployed among high school leavers with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities using a nationally representative data set. Data for this study were extracted from the 8th Panel Survey of Employment for the Disabled raw data from Korea Employment Agency for the Disabled in 2015. The target sample number for this study was 100. Specifically, there were 76 people with intellectual disabilities and 24 people with developmental disabilities in the data set. This study found that the employed were more likely to be male, had milder disabilities, graduated from colleges, and did not receive social security beneficiaries, had better computer skills and social skills, did not need help for daily activities, and received vocational services and vocational training than the unemployed. Also, this study revealed that the people who were employed were more satisfied about life satisfaction as well as had higher self-esteem than those who were unemployed among high school leavers with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Kyeong-Hwa Kim

Kyeong-Hwa Kim

Professor, Konkuk University
Hello~


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Effect of Enhanced Milieu Communication Intervention…
Limited Capacity seats available

This study intended to examine the effect of enhanced milieu communication intervention on the functional communication behaviors for a young child with special needs. A four year old child diagnosed with developmental delay was selected as subject, a multiple baseline design across settings was also used for this study. The results of this study showed that enhanced milieu communication intervention increased the request (request for information, behavior, objects, & permission), & reaction (reaction to question, request, repetition, & ritual response) on functional communication behaviors for a young child with developmental delay.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Effects of Positive Behavior Support on Yelling Behaviors and Social Interaction Behaviors of Toddler with Developmental Delay
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of positive behavior support on yelling behaviors and social interaction behaviors of toddler with developmental delay. The subject of this study was a 31months toddler with developmental delay. The individualized PBS consisted of intervention of antecedents & setting events, alternative behavior instruction, and consequences . The ABAB reversal design was utilized as a research design. The frequency of behaviors were measured using event recording. The results of this study were as follows: First, the positive behavior intervention reduced the frequency of yelling behaviors. Secondly, the positive behavior intervention increased the frequency of social interaction behaviors. In conclusion, the individualized positive behavior intervention reduced the frequency of yelling behaviors and increased the frequency of social interaction behaviors. Therefore, the overall quality of life of toddler with developmental delay has shown to be improved.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Life Experience of Adults who have a Sibling with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This poster will present findings of a study designed to investigate the experience of adults who have a sibling with disabilities in Korea. This study used a qualitative, grounded theory approach with eight participants. Individual semi-structured in-depth interviews and audio-recorded with all participants were conducted. Through the coding process, we constructed a paradigm model on the life of adults who have sibling with disabilities in Korea. The results of this study pointed to the importance of context and intervening conditions as well as the provision to support siblings who have people with disabilities in Korea.

Speakers
KH

Kyung-Im Han

Professor, Changwon National University
Kyung-Im Han is a professor in the Department of Special Education, Changwon National University, South Korea. Her research interest is on physical disabilities, augmentative and alternative communication, grounded theory, subjective study and teaching strategies for students wit... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Use of Functional Communication Training for Elementary Aged Children in Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate the use of Functional Communication Training (FCT) in the educational setting. Specifically, this review sought to assess how FCT is utilized in the elementary education setting to address challenging behavior for students ages 5-12 who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The goal of this review was to examine the existing base of literature to describe: (a) who is implementing FCT, (b) for what types of problem behaviors, (c) the language targets (e.g., one-word mands), (d) which communication systems are being utilized, and (e) the methods used to teach the language targets. To be included in this review, studies had to (a) have been published in a peer-reviewed journal before July 2016, (b) be available in English, (c) used FCT for intervention or as part of an intervention package, (d) have conducted the study in an elementary education setting, (e) used FCT to address challenging behavior, and (f) include participants between the ages of 5-12 who had either a diagnosis or educational eligibility of ASD. Results showed that FCT is most commonly used in self-contained special education classrooms or a segregated setting. Additionally, the primary interventionists identified in the research were people other than the teacher. The results indicate a need for increased research exploring the use of FCT as a behavioral intervention within integrated school settings by educational professionals to increase the social validity of FCT. The results of this literature review support the theme of this year's TASH conference by demonstrating the need for more research into behavioral intervention methods that allow for greater inclusion and participating within the educational setting.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

University-School District Collaborative Partnership for Urban Special Education Reform
Limited Capacity seats available

This session presents the findings of a university-school district research collaboration that (1) investigates and maps the associations among demographic variables, educational environment, and service delivery models with the outcome variable of performance-based outcomes (e.g., achievement tests and graduation rates) of students with significant disabilities in one urban school district; and (2) examines how district- and school-level leaders interpret and implement education policies that govern the educational environments and service delivery models for students, especially students with complex support needs, served under IDEA.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using an Apple Watch to Increase Daily Living Skills for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will discuss the effects of using wearable technology (Apple Watches) combined with an evidence-based practice (video-prompting) on independent daily living skill acquisition for students with autism spectrum disorders. The students in this project independently navigated through video prompts to watch each step of the task. This presentation will also provide an overview of video-prompting methods as well as best practices in video-prompt development. Access to this technology supports the inclusion of students with disabilities in schools and communities, increases independence, and reduces the need for socially stigmatizing external supports.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Grade Aligned Science to Students with ASD
Limited Capacity seats available

This study used a multiple probe across participants design to investigate the effects of a computer-assisted instructional package on the acquisition of science content for middle school students with autism. Poster will include: literature review, discussion of methods, visual presentation of results, implications for practice, and suggestions for future research. This presentation aligns with the conference theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" as it demonstrates how computer-assisted instruction can be used to provide high-quality, grade-aligned academic instruction within inclusive settings.

Speakers
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using Long Road Home Activities to Encourage States to Comply with Olmstead
Limited Capacity seats available

It has been 18 years since the U.S. Supreme Court Olmstead decision (Olmstead), in which people with disabilities were expressly given the right to live in and receive services in the community. Today, people with disabilities are still having to struggle for equal opportunities to be included in the community compared to people without disabilities. The Long Road Home initiative was formed to highlight the meaning and importance of the Olmstead decision. Its goal is to raise awareness about the rights of people with disabilities by holding multiple events both in Georgia and across the country on the anniversary of Olmstead, June 22. All Long Road Home events incorporate at least two elements: (1) The sharing of stories, known as "I am Olmstead" Freedom stories, which are told by and about people who have transitioned out of nursing facilities and institutions and are now living successfully and happily in their communities; and (2) The availability of educational materials on voting as well as voter registration forms to assist people to exercise their basic citizenship right to vote.

Speakers
avatar for Cheri Mitchell

Cheri Mitchell

advocate/ member, GA ADvocacy Office/ People First of GA
Cheri Mitchell is first and foremost a Self-Advocate. She has spent the last twenty years working on behalf of people with disabilities and people who are elderly, and mentoring and supporting self-advocates across Georgia and the nation. She is dedicated to helping people get ou... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Why Inclusive Education? Creating an Inclusive Culture
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion", by developing a deep understanding of why inclusive education is important and how to create an inclusive school culture for all students, including students with significant disabilities. With a focus on students with complex needs, this interactive workshop teaches the importance of equity and opportunity while discussing five essential school pillars that are the foundation for creating an inclusive mindset for both students, families, and staff. The triangle of support, consisting of personal supports, instructional and assistive technology, and curricular accommodations and modifications will be explained in detail. Students have the right to a sense of belonging in their school environments and this session prepares participants to draft their own school-wide philosophy and pillars that embrace a free and appropriate education for all.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Working Together: Cross-Cultural Collaboration between Mothers and Special Educators
Limited Capacity seats available

Family/educator collaboration is at the heart of effective special education service delivery. This study examines the nature of family/educator interactions in the context of three Somali-American boys with autism. The mothers of the three boys represent a range of socioeconomic, marital, and educational backgrounds, much like the three teachers who also have varying levels of education and experiences with autism. Serial semi-structured interviews were used to gauge experiences and information from three different cases. A theme analysis revealed five central themes: (1) social status and level of parental education/knowledge of autism affects resource acquisition (2) teacher qualifications and background/experience can influence their role as a professional, (3) parents and professionals uniting for a common reason (4) translating families€™ goals and hopes into educational planning (5) importance of advocacy. Implications for practice will also be discussed (e.g., using different modes of communication [in-person meetings, phone calls, daily communication logs, etc.] that are comfortable to both the family and educator; opportunities for families to be involved in schools [dances, events, etc.])


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

5:30pm

TASH Board of Directors Meeting
This meeting is open to TASH Board Members only.

Moderators
avatar for Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Ruthie-Marie Beckwith

Executive Director, TASH
Ruthie-Marie Beckwith, Ph.D. is the Executive Director at TASH, a non-profit that advocates for human rights and inclusion for people with significant disabilities. She is a national consultant who helps people with disabilities develop and implement strategies for greater autono... Read More →

Thursday December 14, 2017 5:30pm - 7:30pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

7:00pm

Sock Hop Dance
Thursday December 14, 2017 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303
 
Friday, December 15
 

7:30am

Inclusive Education Committee Meeting
The Inclusive Education Committee works together to support research, policy, and products for inclusive education.  During this meeting, we will review our agenda and progress.

Moderators
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
DT

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions

Friday December 15, 2017 7:30am - 8:20am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
The Exhibit Hall will be open during these times.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:00am - 12:00pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:00am

Quiet Room
The quiet room is available for all TASH conference attendees, and is located on the Lobby level just down the hall from the hotel's concierge desk.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
L502 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:29am

About TASH Talks
TASH Talks are informal discussions regarding a topic that are not meant to provide answers, but rather evoke creative thinking about an issue (e.g. personal experience, story, point of view). Presentations are chosen at random from the list below.  And, each presenter delivers his/her talk around a particular topic for 8-10 minutes. 
    This year's confirmed TASH Talk presenters are listed in no particular order.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:29am - 10:30am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:29am

About Breakout Sessions
Breakout Sessions are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:29am - 4:10pm
TBA

8:30am

Creating a Vi$ion for Your Life
Limited Capacity seats available

Money plays an important role in everybody's life. Everyone needs financial education and other opportunities to better understand how to manage money and save towards our individual goals. In this session, you will identify a goal that you have for yourself and explore how to earn, manage, and save money to meet your goal. You will also hear from a self-advocate on their success in building their money skills. During this session, we will complete the following activities:
1. Mini-Vision Board Activity a. Identify a goal that you have for yourself? b. What is the cost to reach your goal?
2. First Money Memory Activity
3. What are some of your needs related to money? a. What are strategies for meeting your money needs? b. How can you earn more money and save your money, even when you need to keep a public benefit?
This session is intended for self-advocates and their allies but is a fun, interactive session for anyone interested in building their money skills.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Discover, Show, Experience! Don't just ask and expect an answer...
Limited Capacity seats available

Many adolescents and young adults with significant disabilities are not able to answer questions reliably that have great impact on their future lives. Such questions may include "What kind of job do you want?" "What kind of place would you like to live in and call home?" "Who would you like to support you?" "Which people do you want to spend more time with?" "What do you want to do in your free time?" As a result, parents and staff often make decisions based on presumptions of incompetence, without consideration of the person's right to self-determine, or given poor advice that boils down to "one size fits all." This session will describe practical, respectful and person-centered application of evidence-based strategies to discover what each individual really needs, wants, prefers, and is interested in for their own quality of life. Use of assistive technology as well as inclusive experiences that allow discovery, seeing, and experiencing a range of opportunities will be addressed so that individuals who cannot otherwise tell you answers to questions you may ask of them can still make informed and supported decisions that pertain to their own equity, opportunity and inclusion.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Dreams, Goals & Graduation: Inclusive Postsecondary Education as a Path to Careers
Limited Capacity seats available

Why go to college? The holistic answer is to grow as a person, the practical answer is to grow career prospects, and of course both are true. People with intellectual disabilities are no different, and with the explosive growth in the number of inclusive post-secondary education programs, more and more people with cognitive disabilities are choosing IPSE as their route to a career. In this presentation, three long-time members of the inclusive postsecondary community in Georgia, including a recent IPSE graduate, will share the ongoing evolution of IPSE in their state and stories of its impact on a veritable rainbow of individuals. We'll discuss how to find a successful fit between a person and an inclusive postsecondary experience and share practical advice on how to bake quality career development into the core of a program, how to support successful student transition from school to career, and the critical role of providers, state agencies and families. Attendees will be critical participants in this session, engaging in activities like the Unpredictable Path Game, a team exercise inspired by the real-life experiences of members of the inclusive postsecondary community that will illustrate some of the twists, turns, opportunities and outcomes an inclusive postsecondary education can bring.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Elevating Olmstead Advocacy: Lessons from Georgia's Olmstead Experience
Limited Capacity seats available

Georgia is the Olmstead state. We brought the Olmstead case, experienced the slow progress of Olmstead planning, and then obtained the first and most extensive Justice Department Olmstead Settlement in 2010. Since then, we have made major strides in transforming our mental health system, but slow progress in transforming our systems for people with developmental disabilities and physical disabilities. Throughout this process, we have learned lessons in (1) self-advocacy; (2) coalition building of stakeholders; (3) systems transformation in agencies, housing, and state Olmstead planning, (4) peer supports; (5) litigating Olmstead; and (6) seeking comprehensive Olmstead settlements and remedies. This presentation will demonstrate the important lessons for future Olmstead advocacy from Georgia's experience -- the experience of the Olmstead state. This presentation will directly align with the conference theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," because it will provide concrete lessons for self-advocates and advocates from Georgia's experience transforming from a state that had a 19th century system of institutionalizing people with disabilities to 21st century opportunities for inclusion, independence, and meaningful opportunities to participate, work, and live in the community for people with significant disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Talley Wells

Talley Wells

attorney, ALAS
Talley Wells is the Director of the Disability Integration Project at the Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Inc. He is also the creator of OlmsteadRights.org, which launched in 2014 through a grant from the Legal Services Corporation. He advocates for individuals with disabilities who a... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Evaluating Communication Apps Based on Current Research and Critical Criteria
Limited Capacity seats available

Communication is vital to interacting with the environment, making decisions about one's life, and inclusion across settings. To support communication for individuals who could benefit from alternative and augmentative communication, knowledge about the utility of common and popular technology, and evidence supporting its use is a requirement. This systematic review examines the existing body of research on augmentative and alternative communication in the form of applications for mobile devices. Findings provide evidence of limited quality research on communication apps. There is not enough research to identify these apps as research-based, but study results indicate apps are a promising technology with the potential for utility with individuals with complex communication support needs. A synthesis of guidelines for reviewing apps based on critical criteria is presented as a guide for evaluation of apps and matching apps to the needs of communicators.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Exploring Students' Perceived Messages of Self-Reliance by Three Entities Involved in Transition
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will discuss results from a small study demonstrating how perceived messages from families, schools, and social service agencies affect the resilience, successes, and challenges of individuals with developmental disabilities to create positive school-to-adulthood transitions. Four participants with developmental disabilities were qualitatively interviewed for this study. With the absence of the school personnel member who did not contribute to the study, one school personnel member, family member, and social service agency worker associated with each participant were interviewed as well. The session will discuss themes derived from the interview data: a) the construction of disability, b) the overall positive messages (or perceived messages) that participants from school personnel experienced regarding one's disabilities and how families and social service agencies supported those messages, c) the positive and negative messages (or perceived messages) that participants from schools experienced regarding one's disabilities and how families and social service agencies supported or did not support those messages, and d) the overall negative messages (or perceived messages) that participants from schools experienced regarding one's disabilities and how families and social service agencies supported or did not support those messages. These themes demonstrated how a combination of reproduction, agency, construction of disability, and resistance shape the participants' economic and governmental dependency statuses.

Speakers
TR

Tracy Rackensperger

Since 2006, Tracy Rackensperger, Ph.D. has held a public service faculty position within the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, Institute on Human Development and Disability at the University of Georgia. Rackensperger has expertise in overseeing the development and implemen... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

HCBS, Community Living & Day/Employment Services: How to do it
Limited Capacity seats available

One agency and the people they support will share their stories of how to provide person-centered supported living and community day services where people are included in community settings which fully meet the HCBS Waiver Rules. Discussion topics will also include systems change strategies for agencies and programs to move from segregated services to inclusive community services by implementing person-centered practices through self-determination and PBIS in order to comply with the federal rule.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Shepard

Scott Shepard

Director, Avenues Supported Living Services
Scott Shepard is the Executive Director of Avenues Supported Living Services, a non-profit agency which provides community living and personalized day supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in North Los Angeles County. With Avenues SLS, we had the opp... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

State Continuum Regulations and Their Relationships to Inclusion for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This session examines state continuum of alternative placement regulations and policy frameworks that facilitate the inclusion of students with significant disabilities in general education classrooms and policy differences between highly inclusive states with positive outcomes for students with significant disabilities and highly segregated states with poor outcomes for students with significant disabilities.

Speakers
DT

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Tackling the Problem of Problem Solving
Limited Capacity seats available

Students with disabilities have historically been victims of low expectations in mathematics, resulting in inequitable opportunities in and access to the general curriculum. Despite mathematical problem solving being the "cornerstone of mathematical learning"€ according to mathematics experts (e.g., National Council of Teachers of Mathematics), it has received limited attention from researchers (Spooner, Root, Saunders, & Browder, 2017; King, Lemons, and Davidson, 2016). This presentation will feature four studies that used evidence-based practices to teach students with autism and intellectual disability to solve mathematical word problems. Implications for practice and future research will be discussed.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Using Participation Plans to Teach Social Studies Content in Inclusive Secondary Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this project was to teach social studies content to high school students with intellectual and developmental disabilities in general education (inclusive) settings. Limited research focused on teaching social studies content to students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as limited interventions in inclusive settings for this population have been completed; as such, this project is needed to inform practitioners and researchers alike. A single-case, multiple baseline across prioritized skill categories (knowledge of facts, vocabulary, and comprehension) and participants was employed. Data analysis included visual inspection of trend, level, and variability changes across phases as well as measures of Percent of All Non-Overlapping Data. Findings from this project will significantly inform inclusive instructional methods for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

We want to read too! Modifying shared reading for children with complex communication needs
Limited Capacity seats available

The ability to read is essential to both academic success and overall quality of life. Reading is a pivotal skill, that is, the ability to read leads to further learning opportunities and empowers individuals to better access their community. Unfortunately, students who have complex communication needs (CCN) are often restricted in their opportunities to develop literacy skills resulting in dismal reading outcomes for this population. An estimated 50% - 90% of individuals with complex communication needs are either illiterate or reading well below grade level expectations (Koppenhaver & Yoder, 1992). In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and promise of a modified shared reading intervention package for students with CCN. The results of the study demonstrate that children with CCN are able to "participate (and benefit from)”shared reading activities given appropriate modifications and accommodations.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Fleury

Veronica Fleury

Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota
Veronica Fleury, Ph.D., BCBA-D | | Dr. Fleury is an assistant professor of special education at the University of Minnesota, where she also serves as the coordinator for the autism teacher licensure and master’s degree program. Her research focuses on optimizing instructio... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

What to Wear? A Closer Look at Some Wearable Technologies
Limited Capacity seats available

Technology is evolving at a fast past. Now a days there are more wearable technologies available than ever before! But what do these technologies do and how can they assist someone with a disability? What to wear? During this session, participants will learn and see some of the new technologies. Participants will have a chance delve into the world of smart watches and apps that can assist with task management and GPS. Participants will also learn about items that can be worn to assist with reading as well as getting around town. They will also learn what holographic computing is and the future of using it. Participants will also learn how to get more out of the fitness bands then just steps they take per day.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

What works? Stories of Successful Leadership in the Lives, Groups and Communities of People with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

The interest of this research is in the lens of leadership through knowledge gathered from and with the self advocate community through a series of "community conversations," focus groups and literature reviews. It is often an assumption that leadership is a somewhat singular, rare quality in limited supply, based on individualistic qualities which perhaps more than anything else, exist at the far end of an imaginary meritocratic scale, where people are smartest, quickest and most powerful. This research demonstrates that people with intellectual disabilities perform leadership and demonstrate capacity to lead, sometimes in traditional, individualistic ways but more frequently in relational, interdependent ways that focus on what emerges from and within the groups they are part of. Their leadership may look different than we expect, but once we acknowledge and understand their capacity and methods we might better incorporate them into projects and initiatives that support social change, to the benefit of their peers and the communities they are part of. Self advocates who assisted in the design of the research created an iterative framework with constant touch-points to return the growing body of information to their community. This research exemplifies the theme of "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" by including people with disabilities in research design, facilitation and dissemination on a topic of interest to them through a social constructionist framework.

Speakers
avatar for Shelley Nessman

Shelley Nessman

Consultant, In the Company of Others


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Human Rights Committee Meeting
Group meeting to debrief topics of interest and connect face-to-face.

Moderators
Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Access Community
Limited Capacity seats available

Here are the voices of real and personal success stories of community inclusion and opportunities of individuals with complex support needs. We have learned how to create meaningful and long lasting community relationships through trial error, observation, exploration and research. In-depth continued learning encourages opportunities in educating community members and the creation of natural supports; allowing people to experience known and unknown areas of interests that CAN evolve into meaningful connections. From this forum, we would like everyone to be inspired to create true equity and community inclusion for ALL.

Speakers
avatar for Angela Zold

Angela Zold

Community Coach, Total Living Concept


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Don't Judge This Book by it's Cover
Limited Capacity seats available

My world is filled with many things that are out of my control and by any reasonable standard could be considered devastating. However, both subjectively and objectively, I have a lot to be happy about. This includes communication, advocacy and reciprocal relationships. Using a keyboard or letterboard, I am now able to communicate all day long and this has been life changing. Since presenting at TASH last year, I have been invited to talk with scientists and educators about rethinking autism. I hope this helps to reshape the thinking of those in influential positions. I also got a chance to publicly tell my sister how much she means to me and that my autism is not her lifelong responsibility.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Family Advocacy for the Education of Children with Autism
Limited Capacity seats available

Research on family advocacy and involvement in the education of children with autism have been reported extensively in the literature. This presentation will provide useful information and approaches for stakeholders in special education to work in collaboration with families to advocate for students with autism from culturally diverse backgrounds. Research on international family perspectives and experiences will be included. The true stories from the presenter who is an international parent of a child with autism, a graduate scholar in special education, and a parent mentor for and with families from Asia will be shared to benefit the participants.

Speakers
avatar for Tanyathorn Hauwadhanasuk

Tanyathorn Hauwadhanasuk

Graduate / Teaching Assistant, Saint Louis University
Hello TASH Families, | | My name is Tanyathorn Hauwadhanasuk, or Tanya (from a parent to an advocate, mentor and educator). | MY BRIEF BIO: | EDUCATION: | - B.B.A. in Marketing, Business Administration, Assumption University, Bangkok Thailand. | - M.A. in Special Ed... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Individual Stories of iPad Usage: What's Going on in Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

In this study, I sought to understand how iPads were used in classrooms with students with low incidence disabilities. This study utilized a qualitative approach including semi-structured interviews, observations, and document analysis to understand the following question: To what extent (how far & how much) are iPads used in inclusive classrooms to support the needs of students with low incidence disabilities. By examining the stories of four student participants, I was able to shed light on how teachers integrated iPads into a classroom for students with low incidence disabilities. iPad integration is imperative in today's educational society because iPads are increasing in number within the classroom and used for both educational as well as entertainment purposes.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Parents with Disabilities Discriminated Against in Family Courts
Limited Capacity seats available

Ms. Stephenson is an autistic self advocate and author. In 2015, she was served with Family Court papers regarding her then, eight year old son, whom also has autism. At the time Ms. Stephenson was not concerned. However, she soon learned that it didn't matter how smart she was, or how many people testified that she was competent, 35 states still have laws stripping individuals like Ms. Stephenson of their Parental Rights. The only thing Ms. Stephenson did wrong, she did not hide her disability from the courts. Even if she could have, the Court used a documentary Ms. Stephenson participated in (a TASH documentary) against her in Court. Ms. Stephenson has researched cases across the Country and the United Kingdom similar to her own. She would like to use this presentation as a way to begin an open dialogue and organizing the Disability Community to overturn the laws in place and replace them with laws that protect Parents with Disabilities in Family Court. Parents with Disabilities are not being given an Opportunity to participate in Family Courts. The Family Court Laws in place discriminate against Parents with Disabilities and Family Courts do not adhere to the Americans with Disabilities Act.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Supported Decision Making: A Family's Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

Supported Decision Making: A Family's Perspective Supported decision making is a time tested, culturally typical, and powerful way of making decisions and governing one's life. However, despite all of the advocacy efforts to ensure that people with disabilities are recognized in the rightful role as a citizens, we still find that when you live with a disability, you are vulnerable to being controlled and having decisions made for and about you i.e., where you will live, where and how you will spend your day, who you can socialize with, etc. One of the clearest examples of the perpetuation of control of people with disabilities is the often routine advice that is given to parents to assume guardianship of or to appoint a guardian for their family member with a disability. This session will look at the concept of supported decision making through the eyes of a family who is committed to respecting the rights of their daughter as a citizen to make decisions and control her life. The potency, benefits, viability, and structure of supported decision making will be discussed. Their daughter's leadership and the family journey to supported decision making will be shared.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

The Power of One: Becoming an Influencer for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

As a sibling of a sister with a disability, I will share my story of growing up as a sister and my sister's perspective of living with a disability. My storytelling piece will capture the challenging questions faced to me, my other siblings, and my sister, and the emerged answers that shed light on the only life we know. The experiences shared will reflect how the power of one individual can evolve oneself and others to be influencers of change for equity, opportunity, and inclusion.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Mueller

Sarah Mueller

Graduate Assistant, Institute on Disabilities, Temple University
Sibling. Former high school special education teacher. Master of Public Policy and Disability Studies Graduate Student. UCEDD Trainee. Graduate Assistant at Temple University's Institute on Disabilities


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 10:25am
Imperial Ballroom, Salon B 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

AAC Modeling in Inclusive Classrooms: Practice makes perfect!
Limited Capacity seats available

Accumulated evidence in AAC research now strongly supports the importance of AAC modeling to increase students' language use and competence using either high- or low-teach AAC tools (Sennott, Light, & McNaughton 2016). Inclusive educational settings are the ideal context in which to implement modeling within both academic and social contexts. In this session, examples of systems used for implementing strong AAC modeling among paraprofessionals, teachers, and peers will be shared, along with ideas for getting started in your own classrooms. Emphasis will also be placed on increasing opportunities for AAC use throughout the school day.


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Advocating in Your Faith Community: Tips for Self-Advocates and Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Ever wonder how to get more involved in your faith community or how to get involved for the first time in a faith community? "Tried and true" tips for self-advocates (and family members) will be discussed both about fuller expression of spirituality and networking with those share the same values and beliefs who can support other aspects of leading a good life inclusively in the community. Interaction with participants occurs throughout the session!

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Expanding Boundaries and Erasing Boarders: Including Rural Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

How are rural communities working to provide inclusive social and educational experiences for students with significant disabilities? Amidst the problems rural schools may face, they have characteristics that could have the potential to promote inclusive schools and more equitable opportunities for students with significant disabilities. It may be perceived of rural communities that there is not a wide-range of diversity, but scholars have reflected on this myth claiming that may not be entirely true of rural schools and in fact, they may have similar amounts of diverse differences as urban communities. By reflecting and examining the high disability and poverty rates in rural areas, schools will be better able to create an inclusive school environment for all students. A presentation of current literature will aim to examine the barriers which may exist for rural schools to provide inclusive education services for their students with significant disabilities. This study attempts to develop conclusions of the barriers rural schools may be facing when it comes to creating inclusive special education services for students with significant disabilities in rural areas.

Speakers
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

Special Education Doctoral Student, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Implementing Emergent Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

The presenters will describe a randomized controlled trial funded by the Institute of Education Sciences to investigate the effectiveness of a promising emergent reading program developed for students with intellectual disabilities and autism when it is implemented in small group contexts in general education classrooms--with classmates participating on a rotating basis in the reading lessons. Although the reading program has a strong evidence base, all of the previous efficacy research was conducted in special education classroom settings. We hypothesized that the program not only could be implemented successfully and effectively in general education classrooms, but also that the peers would benefit from their participation in the reading lessons; that is, we anticipated that the opportunity provided to peers to observe their classmates with disabilities as competent, emerging readers and to engage with them in supported, positive interactions would produce positive changes in their perceptions of the students' characteristics and abilities. We will share with participants not only the results related to the changes in the emergent reading skills of students participating in the study, but also the changes in peer attitudes associated with their experiences as "reading buddies."


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Individual and Family Correlates of Living Options Among Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

With recent policy and caselaw decisions, there are more opportunities for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) to live independently. To develop targeted interventions to increase independent living, it is necessary to identify malleable correlates of living options. To this end, 546 parents and siblings of adults with IDD responded to a national survey. Per parent and sibling report, individuals with IDD were more likely to live outside of the family home when the family engaged in future planning, had more informal supports, had parents with less caregiving abilities, and the individual with IDD had more functional abilities. Among the 187 individuals with IDD who lived outside of the family home, individuals with IDD with more problem behaviors and less functional abilities were more likely to live in group homes with more than four individuals (versus independently with or without supports). When parents had poor caregiving abilities, individuals with IDD were more likely to live in group homes with more than four individuals (versus independently). When the family engaged in more future planning or the individual had less functional abilities, individuals with IDD were more likely to live in a group home with less than four individuals (versus independently). Implications for policymakers, practitioners, and future research are discussed.


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Managed Long-Term Services and Supports: Could it actually make things better for people with disabilities?
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will address the question of whether managed long-term services and supports can create better access to supports and better inclusion and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities than traditional long-term services and supports programs. Speakers from Tennessee will reflect on the state's experience with managed long-term services and supports for people with physical, developmental and intellectual disabilities. Presenters will discuss what they have learned about how to use managed care as a tool to advance equity, opportunity and inclusion and to create more accountability for the use of public funds to advance the civil and human rights of people with disabilities.


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Promoting Teacher Agency for Inclusive Education
Limited Capacity seats available

This session focuses on transforming teacher education to reflect beliefs, efficacy, and agency necessary for teachers to realize inclusive student outcomes. We will describe our conceptual model of inclusive teacher agency, and describe preliminary results associated with the learning experiences for teaching and advocacy to transform predominantly segregated services. We seek to identify the critical influences of teachers' growth toward inclusion.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and tran... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison`


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Protecting Human Rights: Empowering Self-Advocates to Serve on Human Rights Committees
Limited Capacity seats available

A leader in DC's self-advocacy coalition, Project ACTION!, is working with the Self Advocacy Resource and Technical Assistance Center (SARTAC) on a project to develop training materials and approaches for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) so that they can serve effectively on Human Rights Committees and other Boards and Workgroups. There are lots of Human Rights Committees and Boards without any members who are people with I/DD, even though those committees and boards make decisions that affect the lives of people with I/DD. It's very important that people with disabilities have a voice on boards and workgroups that make decisions that affect them to protect the rights of people with disabilities. This interactive session will describe the materials being developed, explore the many roles that self-advocates can play, and heard from participants about their experiences with self-advocates serving on Human Rights Committees and other board and workgroups. This project is a collaboration between Project ACTION!, D.C.'s Developmental Disabilities Administration, D.C.'s Human Rights Advisory Committee and provider-level human rights committees. Self-advocates will review the materials and training approaches and provide feedback on what works for them and what should be changed before the materials are final.

Speakers
PH

Phyllis Holton

Deputy Director for Operations, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate g... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Student Participation in Extracurricular Activities: Does It Make Any Difference?
Limited Capacity seats available

The presentation will discuss the findings of a research study that examined the participation of middle and high school students with severe disabilities in school sponsored extracurricular activities. Specifically, the study sought to understand the extent to which teachers are purposefully planning for and delivering instruction during extracurricular activities, and methods used by teachers to monitor how students' learning goals are addressed (e.g., extracurricular goals are included in IEPs). The findings have direct implications for promoting inclusive practice.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments a... Read More →
SD

Stacy Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Ten Positive Behavior Strategies Parents (and Teachers!) Can Use on Monday
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will identify ten practical research-based strategies that are critical in the development of positive behavior support plans and are equally effective when implemented at school or at home. Specific examples will be provided for home and school across age levels from preschool through middle/high school. Participants will have the opportunity to identify strategies they can use through an interactive activity throughout the presentation. This presentation is adapted from the topical parent session that has been presented at the Parents Encouraging Parents Special Education Weekend retreat that the Colorado Department of Education has held tri-annually for the past ten years. It has been the highest rated session and parents have expressed that they finally know what to do to support their child and work with the school.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Typing: From Research to Practice to Independence
Limited Capacity seats available

Our well-attended 2016 National TASH presentation on "Typing" led to a discussion involving typists, experts, practitioners, family members, and researchers; this interaction inspired the creation of a longer form presentation and conversation. When learning to tie one's shoes, the ultimate goal is independently well-tied shoes, not the method used (e.g., "bunny ears" vs. "around the tree"). Similarly, when learning to type the ultimate goal is independently well-typed communication, not the method used (e.g., "home row" vs. "hunt and peck"). This session will focus on current research, best practices, and teaching and supporting independent typing for people who do not have reliable speaking skills.

Speakers
avatar for Molly K. Rearick

Molly K. Rearick

Founder & Director, Reid's Gift, Inc.


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Won't You Help Us: Organizational Features of Meaningful Support for Families
Limited Capacity seats available

The traditionally underserved for the most part are comprised of people of color from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and often concentrated in impoverished communities. This study was designed to provide insight into the experiences of traditionally underserved families within the developmental disabilities services system from the perspective of families.


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

You Can't Do That! Lessons Learned from an Inclusive University Course
Limited Capacity seats available

Postsecondary education programs for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (PSEs) in colleges and universities expand opportunities (Grigal, Hart, & Weir, 2012) and result in positive outcomes, including increased employment and improved social networks of support (Thoma et al., 2011). Although participating in postsecondary education results in numerous benefits for students with disabilities (Moore & Schelling, 2015), higher education faculty and staff are often unsure how to conceptualize and develop programs and courses at their home institutions (Mock & Love, 2012) that are inclusive and benefit all students. This presentation will outline the steps taken to develop an inclusive college course focused on Transition, Issues & Planning, that enrolls students who are obtaining a Chancellor's certificate via the University PSE program and single/dual teacher certification at a Midwestern 4 year University. Challenges and successes will be shared, as well as student and faculty perspectives of the experience.

Speakers
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Alabama Chapter Meeting
New Chapter for Alabama!  Meet the members from around the state and learn about the Alabama TASH goals and focus for the 2017-2018 National Disability Conference - June 2018 Fundraising as a new TASH chapter.

Speakers
VM

Veronica McGee

I am a parent of a son born with congenital hydrocephalus. Kyle is 17 and is nonverbal and uses both a manual and power chair. I am here with my very good friend and advocate, Susan Ellis. She educated, supported and brought so much clarity to our ongoing journey with Kyle's p... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Helping Families Hold High Expectations for Employment and Postsecondary Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Studies show a strong relationship between parent expectations and transition outcomes for youth with disabilities. However, conveying and maintaining high expectations can be a challenge for parents, educators, and youth themselves. This session will discuss how low expectations can creep into the transition process, how those expectations can be raised, and will use a National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT) manuscript to help brainstorm strategies for supporting families to envision great futures. Key Words: This highly interactive session will include large group discussions based on key questions related to helping families see bright futures for their youth. Those discussions will be supported by content and presenter experiences that highlight successes stories for youth with significant disabilities in employment and postsecondary education. The whole session rests on a dual-capacity foundation: 1) helping families and professionals acquire high expectations, and 2) helping families and professionals convey high expectations so others may act accordingly. This session aligns well with the conference theme Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion. Though great strides have been made in recent decades to address the achievement gap for youth with significant disabilities, much work is still needed. Youth with significant disabilities still lack opportunities in employment and postsecondary education. This session addresses one of the core issues: low expectations, but does so with a spirit of hope.

Speakers
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Project Manager, Youth Employment Solutions Center / National TASH


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:35am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Advocates. Leaders. Friends.
Limited Capacity seats available

In this panel discussion on family engagement in the lives of children and youth with disabilities, parents will share stories of individual advocacy, community building and their growth in leadership skills. They will discuss how they created a circle of support through their friendships, how those friendships began and have sustained through thick and thin - insults and compliments - mistakes and success - forgiveness and acceptance!

Speakers
avatar for Claire Dees

Claire Dees

Executive Director, Spectrum
Claire Dees is currently the Executive Director of Spectrum Autism Support Group.  Her experience includes 30 years in the field of disabilities, both as a parent and a professional.  Spectrum is a non-profit organization, which she co-founded, providing support, educational and resources for individuals and families impacted by autism for the past 20 years, serving over 1500 families and their children in the Gwinnett and metro Atlanta... Read More →
KE

Kathy Everett

Director, Programs and Interventions, Copper River School District
I am the parent of a 30 yo daughter that has Down syndrome. Jennifer was always included in school and is now working part-time (over 8 years). She is now using the waiver and living semi-independently in her own apartment. Her independence has allowed me to begin some adventures... Read More →
avatar for Anne Ladd

Anne Ladd

Family Engagement Specialist, Georgia Department of Education
Anne Ladd is the Family Engagement Specialist for the Ga Department of Education, Division for Special Education Services and Supports. Previously, Ms. Ladd served as a Parent Mentor for Gwinnett County Public schools for 8 years. Ms. Ladd is a Graduate of the University of Geo... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Bilingualism and Autism: Online Information Exchanges for Korean-American Parents of Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This study is a preliminary study on bilingualism in Korean-American children with autism and other development disabilities by conducting a content analysis on 26 threads and 141 replies posted by Korean-American parents in an on-line support community. Contrary to the literature on bilingualism in autism, Korean-American parents were found to share inaccurate information in the community. To enhance communication with parents with limited English skills, professionals and practitioner's in the field may need to invest additional resources in user-friendly online information sources and online interactions with parents of children with autism and other developmental disabilities.

Speakers
JK

Jemma Kim

Assistant Professor, California State University, San Bernardino


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Changing Perspectives & Raising Expectations: Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

There are increasing opportunities available for individuals with intellectual disability to access higher education that prepares them for independent living, social awareness and meaningful work. This session will address the overall landscape of inclusive higher education (IHE), tuition assistance available for students that attend these programs, and the societal impact of these programs. Participants will be equipped with resources to identify and contact different inclusive programs throughout the country. School systems are required to report on Indicator 14 which provides information on the number of students with IEP€™s that attend post-secondary education or are employed. This presentation directly addresses this data. In addition to the national perspective, this session will delve deeper into information regarding each of the five programs in Tennessee (EDGE at Union, FUTURE at UT Knoxville, Lipscomb IDEAL, University of Memphis TigerLIFE, and Vanderbilt Next Steps). By the end of this session, participants will be more prepared to discuss inclusive higher education and the positive impact that these programs have on individuals with and without disabilities. In addition, participants will have materials and an understanding on ways the TN Inclusive Higher Education Alliance can be a resource for their students/families/educators.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Doing It Right: Sexuality Education and Self-Determination
Limited Capacity seats available

Self-determination skills can help people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) make decisions about personal safety, avoid high-risk or dangerous social or sexual situations, and increase personal independence. A difficult balance exists between sexual self-advocacy and guarding against sexual abuse. This lecture session outlines research on sexual self-advocacy for individuals with IDD.

Speakers
avatar for Victoria Slocum

Victoria Slocum

Instructor, University of Kentucky
My research interests are faith inclusion and sexuality & relationship education.


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Equity and Opportunity: Leveling the Playing Field through Assessment, Instruction and Resources
Limited Capacity seats available

All students, including students with significant disabilities, can be afforded equity through learning and applying the same rigorous standards-aligned instruction and content! Connecting students eligible for alternate assessment to standards-aligned content has been the focus of our work for 6 years. This learning is critical to students for future success in employment, education and community, including relationships. It is important to provide all teachers with the tools and professional development support that will result in learning for students across environments. This session will provide participants with examples of standards-aligned content targets, materials, and sample probes which could be appropriate for students across the range of the population of those eligible for alternate assessment. In addition, a rubric will be shared which helps to define the characteristics of solid standards-aligned content that is appropriate for students at different grade levels and those who interact with material at varying levels of complexity. Finally, feedback from teachers who have tried out the examples will be shared to demonstrate ways in which the examples have been used in the classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Sharon L. Leonard

Sharon L. Leonard

Educational Consultant, PaTTAN
Sharon L Leonard is an Educational Consultant at the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network in Harrisburg, working with Pennsylvania’s Alternate Assessment and Pennsylvania’s Inclusive Practices initiative in addition to leading development of resources and modules in regard to effective instructional practices for students with disabilities. She has 37... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Exceptional Lives: How We Can Flourish Under Positive Contingencies of Reinforcement
Limited Capacity seats available

When we arm people with knowledge of behavior principles, we help give them tools for learning any skills they value (Baldwin & Baldwin, 2000). Positive behavior supports are well-suited for creating equitable, accessible and inclusive environments while moving us away from punitive, segregated settings that can diminish quality of life.


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Lessons from the Field: Engaging Families in Research to Improve Outcomes and Services
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation is designed to report on our findings about family engagement in research from the implementation phase of our Family and Direct Support Study conducted at the Research and Training Center on Community Living (RTC-CL) at the University of Minnesota. Our anticipated results, based upon data gathered from prospective families who declined to participate in the study indicate that the engagement of families is often dependent on the availability of direct support staff, time for participation, and the age of their family member with a disability. As a result of these findings, the research team facilitated focus groups to further understand family's experiences and preferences with regard to participating in research. Based upon these two sources of data, the challenges faced when conducting research with families will be addressed, along with strategies for improving engagement of families in future research.

Moderators
avatar for Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Research Associate, University of Minnesota

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Maximizing the Benefit of Storybook Reading to Increase Communication for Individuals with Complex Communication Needs with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Over a decade of research has documented that a child's home environment influences emergent literacy skills in early childhood (Teals, 1987; Bennett et al., 2002). These skills that children develop early in life form the foundation for future success in reading. Accordingly, teachers, parents and other caregivers are instrumental in supporting their children's literacy development by providing them with opportunities to participate in activities that promote literacy and oral language in life. We will focus on one such context that has repeatedly been shown to relate to literacy outcomes: shared reading. Many children with disabilities will have difficulty participating and learning from shared reading activities without appropriate supports. In this session, presenters will provide practical, evidence-based strategies that caregivers, teachers, and other adults can immediately implement to increase the quantity and quality of shared reading experiences. In terms of specific content, we will demonstrate evidence based practices that are shown to improve literacy and communication outcomes for individuals with complex communication needs and have severe disabilities. The presenters will first discuss foundational strategies for creating a reading environment and establishing an appropriate routine around book reading ( Fleury, 2014). In addition, the presenters will demonstrate evidence-based methods for increasing compliance and active participation during book readings, which include selecting texts that appeal to children's interests; establishing (and teaching) expectations for book reading, question and prompting strategies that can be embedded during reading to increase children's engagement, and providing targeted feedback (Fleury, 2014; Fleury & Schwartz, 2016). Participants will learn how to take these strategies and implement them in the general education classroom in order to increase the success of communication and reading for individuals with disabilities. In addition, strategies will be given that focus on how to modify books and book reading activities for individuals that are English Learners. Finally, the presenters will explain and demonstrate a modified book reading strategy for children who have complex communication needs, which includes simple curricular adaptations such as highlighting key vocabulary with visual symbols and providing children with response boards to communicate (Fleury & Kemper, 2016). The examples that will be utilized can be used across the grade span, from early intervention to transition and adulthood. A variety of instructional strategies will be used to engage workshop attendees with the content and facilitate learning, to include: lecture, video examples, live demonstrations/modeling, and discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Fleury

Veronica Fleury

Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota
Veronica Fleury, Ph.D., BCBA-D | | Dr. Fleury is an assistant professor of special education at the University of Minnesota, where she also serves as the coordinator for the autism teacher licensure and master’s degree program. Her research focuses on optimizing instructio... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Peer Supports for Vocational and Social Success of Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Many youth with severe disabilities do not possess the vocational and social skills necessary to secure and sustain employment. One intervention that may improve these skills and provide inclusive opportunities in the work place is peer supports. This study used a multiple baseline design across participants with generalization probes to examine the effects of peer supports on the engagement in independent work tasks and social interactions for students with severe disabilities and their peers in a high school work-based setting.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Athamanah

Lindsay Athamanah

MSU-DOCTRID Hegarty Fellow, Michigan State University


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Preparing Teachers to Provide Access to the General Curriculum: Navigating Barriers
Limited Capacity seats available

This study explores the barriers that teacher educators face in preparing teachers to provide students with severe disabilities access to the general curriculum. Critically, we explore how teacher educators are working to address these barriers. In doing so, we will share ways to navigate these barriers in the hopes of supporting teacher preparation programs in making changes, teacher preparation experiences, and ultimately how students with severe disabilities access the general curriculum.


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Self Advocacy and Resource Center (SARTAC): Advocacy Resource and Technical Assistance Center
Limited Capacity seats available

Presentation on SARTAC Project. This will be include an overview Of resources available through the center, how to access technical assistance through the Center, spotlight on self-advocacy movement, and opportunities for partnerships with other civil rights groups.

Speakers
avatar for Juliana Huereña

Juliana Huereña

Operational Manager, SABE/SWI
avatar for Tia Nelis

Tia Nelis

Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of the past chairperson of the National Organization of Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered. She founded and successfully promoted People First of Illinois, where she served as president. Tia, a long-time member of TASH, has received the Burton Blatt Award, awarded by the Illinois TASH chapter, as well as the Elizabeth Boggs award from the... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Students in the Margins: A Multi-State Analysis of Due Process Hearings Involving Students with Emotional-Behavioral Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will present findings and implications from a multi-state study of special education due process hearings that involved students with emotional-behavioral disabilities. The information presented will include an in-depth discussion of the issues frequently addressed in these due process hearings, including evaluation procedures, IEP development, behavior intervention plans, and suspension/expulsion.


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Turning the Hearts of Parents to Children: How Pre-service Teachers Learn Advocacy
Limited Capacity seats available

I am excited to share how pre-service teachers, as a result of the interactions in my course on family collaboration, have risen to the occasion in their attitudes, skills, and dispositions towards partnering with families of students with disabilities. Although it may be difficult to fully convey to the participants in this brief presentation that which occurs across the course of a full semester of advocacy training, my presentation can at least be considered a rehearsal for learning, applying, and teaching sound interpersonal interaction and reflective skills. The presentation addresses how participants rise towards the level of full advancement described by Fialka, Feldman, and Mikus (2012), as "creative partnering and collaborating" (p.26) in which "The security that comes from knowing that one's hopes, dreams, goals, and concerns are truly important to and valued by one's partner enables a kind of exploration and problem solving that results in brand-new solutions and fresh ideas for intervention." (p.27) Advocacy is rising to the occasion for advancing supports and services for people with disabilities and their families. In concert with the upwardly mobile element of the conference theme I interject a musical analogy present in, Fialka, Feldman and Mikus (2012) text "Parents and Professionals partnering for children with disabilities: A dance that matters". In my experience this text has served as a source of harmony in the choreography of advocacy. For the advocacy partnership between professionals, teachers, and most importantly, the children, to be complete, preservice teachers need an advocacy-rich environment in which to learn the dance of partnership. I give this presentation in the spirit of raising my voice with those of others who are training personnel to become better advocates for TASH's cause. Partnership is the heart of advocacy. My presentation, the title of which paraphrases Malachi's memorable words, promotes the need for preservice teachers to be a collaborative catalyst, early in their career, for lifting up parents with their children, in providing services that include and support them. In addition to teaching the knowledge and skills that are required for successful advocacy, I hope that my presentation will reinforce the powerful role special education teachers and participants of the TASH conference should continue to embrace: Turning the hearts of parents to their children and of children to their parents.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303