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2017 TASH Conference has ended

Each year, the TASH Conference brings together a diverse community of stakeholders who gain information, learn about resources, and connect with others across the country to strengthen the disability field. This year’s conference theme, “Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion,” shows the resilience of individuals with disabilities and their families across the lifespan. Conference attendees will celebrate their passion for disability rights, civil rights, and human rights while exploring inclusive communities, schools, and workplaces that support people with disabilities, including those with complex support needs. Return to TASH website.


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Breakout Sessions [clear filter]
Thursday, December 14
 

9:44am

About Breakout Sessions
Breakout Sessions are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Thursday December 14, 2017 9:44am - 5:15pm
TBA

9:45am

Addressing Equality in Person-Centered Planning
Limited Capacity filling up

Even after years of person-centered planning and thinking, we still miss the mark when we make plans without addressing social inequities and barriers. We may be accessing and playing on the same field but is it really equal or are there still barriers that have to be overcome with "specialized" services and supports. What questions and discussions are we having to level that playing field and ensure equal access to all, addressing the barriers and internalized oppression? During this session we will discuss and problem solve these issues and come up with actions we can all take back to obliterate barriers and truly support all people to live fully included and equal in their community of choice. We will share stories and struggles to begin the conversation.

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Lengyel

Jenny Lengyel

Executive Director, Total Living Concept


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Addressing Multiple Priorities in Academic Core Content Instruction
Limited Capacity filling up

Secondary teachers of students with extensive support needs are tasked with helping their students prepare for successful post-secondary outcomes by setting and making progress toward meaningful goals related to self-determination, social and communication skills, and other individualized needs. Federal law also mandates that teachers provide academic core content instruction that is aligned with grade level standards, and recent federal rulings (e.g., Endrew v. Douglas County) have highlighted the need for instruction to be specially designed based on the unique needs of individual students with disabilities. The impact of standards-based instruction on the adult lives of individuals with extensive support needs is yet to be seen, but increased academic opportunities will provide an increased level of skills over prior generations. One way educators can meet the unique individual needs of their students is to integrate transition skills and goals within academic instruction. This presentation will provide guidance to educators on how to ensure academic core content instruction is personally relevant for secondary students with extensive support needs in the areas of literacy, mathematics, and science.

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Root

Jenny Root

Assistant Professor of Special Education, Florida State University
Jenny would like to talk to you about general curriculum access, teaching math to students with autism/intellectual disability, and how teachers make instructional decisions for students with extensive support needs. Jenny was the 2015 TASH Alice Hayden award winner.


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Cancelled: Access to the General Education Curriculum within Inclusive Classrooms for Students with Complex Support Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

This ethnographic study investigated how educators support students with complex support needs to access the grade-level literacy curriculum within elementary, general education classrooms. Examination of multiple data sources across four classrooms in one school revealed a comprehensive understanding of how the educators support the focus students to be included in grade-level literacy activities using both class-wide and individualized strategies. The findings of this study contribute to the knowledge of how to implement inclusive practices in general education classrooms, which may support increased implementation of inclusive education. The findings of this study also illustrated the educators' passion and excitement for implementing the best possible strategies and practices in order to ensure that the students with complex support needs are held to high expectations, that they are successful, and that they are true members of the classroom community.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Hartzell

Rebecca Hartzell

Assistant Professor of Practice, University of Arizona
Rebecca Hartzell, PhD, BCBA-D is an Assistant Professor of Practice in Department of Disability & Psychoeducational Studies. She has her PhD in Special Education with an emphasis in Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis. She teaches courses and supervises students pursuing board certification... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, NM. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, social... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Comparing the Instructional Days of Students in Inclusive Classrooms vs. Segregated Classrooms
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

This presentation will be focused on a matched comparison study of 32 students in a school district where 16 students were included in general education and 16 were educated in segregated classrooms. This study was carried out in the spring of 2017 and has great significance for TASH's mission of inclusive education for all. The study compares the level of social and instructional engagement in a typical school day for each pair of students.

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Gee

Kathy Gee

California State University, Sacramento


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Creating Pathways to Employment for Young People with IDD
Limited Capacity filling up

Compared to youth without disabilities, integrated employment is lower for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In DC, too many young people with disabilities still graduate from high school into a Day Program rather than college or a job. The DC Department on Disabilities Services in 2016 received a five year Partners in Employment grant from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to establish cross-agency relationships, implement policy and program improvements, and transform systems to increase integrated employment. Through this grant initiative, called DC Learners and Earners, we are working with self-advocates, families, the UCEDD and DD Council, and other community and government partners to raise expectations, transform our service system, and improve employment outcomes for young people with disabilities. DC is one of the initial 6 states to participate in the Community of Practice (CoP) for Supporting Families of Individuals with Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities, which involves collaborations at all levels to develop systems of support for families throughout the lifespan of their family member with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The overall goal of supporting families, with all of their complexity, strengths and unique abilities is so they can best support, nurture, love and facilitate opportunities for the achievement of self-determination, interdependence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of community life for their family members. The DC Learners and Earners Initiative builds on the successful work of the DC Supporting Families CoP. Person-Centered Thinking, the LifeCourse Framework, and Cultural and Linguistic Competency are the lenses through which we view all of our efforts to transform our system, and they are the foundation of our efforts to improve employment outcomes for people with IDD, as well as for our system change efforts more broadly. Families can be our greatest cheerleaders for person-centered and employment first systems change and our strongest advocates, or they can be barriers to systems change. In DC, we wanted to make sure that as we reformed our IDD system, we were working closely with the people we support and their families and were guided by their experiences. We used the LifeCourse & PCT to reframe vision of what success looks like at the individual and systems level and build a shared responsibility for systems change. Panelists from the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice will describe how we have used Person-Centered Thinking and LifeCourse tools and skills to identify areas for systemic advocacy and build shared responsibility for the levels of change that must occur to advance our system of supports for people with and their families, throughout a person's life. With support from the National Center for Cultural Competency at the DC UCEDD, the DC CoP has explored cultural and linguistic diversity so that we are attempting to reach all families. Panelists will share an example of training tools we use with self-advocates, families, partners, and professionals to explore culture and discuss some of our successes and lessons learned. Hear from parents, self-advocates and professionals who use Person-Centered Thinking and the LifeCourse framework skills and tools to promote self-determination, inclusion, and competitive integrated employment. Panelists will share successes in engaging families to not only help the family envision and plan a good life for themselves and their children, but also to better inform state systems change through deep engagement with families. This session will conclude with an interactive question and answer panel discussing how to apply lessons learned in their own state to engage families of all cultures and improve employment outcomes for young people with disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Christopher

Joan Christopher

research instructor, Georgetown University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities
Activities and programs to support people with disabilities and their families
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Deputy Director, Quality Assurance & Performance Management Administration, DC Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Salon

Rebecca Salon

LEAD Center and DC Department on Disability Services
avatar for Kevin Wright

Kevin Wright

RSA/Self Advocate, Department on Disability Services (DDS)
I'm 25 years old who was born and raised in Washington, DC. I attended college at Mitchell College in New London, CT for four years. My major was Communications with a minor in Graphic Design. Now working at DDS where I first started out as an intern. Doing my time at DDS, I been... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Diversity in Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Who's In, Who's Out?
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this presentation is to disseminate survey data that examines the diversity (or lack thereof) in transition and postsecondary programs for students with intellectual disabilities. Two surveys were developed to examine the recruitment and participation of students from diverse backgrounds with intellectual disabilities in these programs. One of the study objectives is to determine if the representation of individuals from diverse backgrounds in transition and postsecondary programs is commensurate with their representation in the population at large and in the K-12 high school population. Therefore, one of the surveys asks directors to respond to questions about demographics of participant students and program staff and the use of recruitment strategies aimed at students from diverse backgrounds. The second survey was designed for the students in transition and postsecondary programs and enquires about their participation and methods used to retain and recruit them in the program. Postsecondary education programs including vocational/technical schools, two-year community colleges, and four-year universities enable students to continue their education after high school and are becoming a minimum standard for attaining a well-paying job. According to Banks (2014), about 70% of high school graduates go on to postsecondary programs, however only nine percent of students with disabilities attend such programs. Banks (2014) also reports that, of students with disabilities who attend college or university, 72% of freshmen are White, while only nine percent of freshmen with disabilities are Black/African-American. Black/African American students with disabilities are less than half as likely as White students to earn a college degree or certificate (Banks, 2014). With the identified importance of postsecondary education programs, there has been a move towards creating more inclusive postsecondary programs, such as programs designed to include students with intellectual disabilities. The goal of these postsecondary programs is for students to master the skills needed to gain integrated competitive employment. Achieving such employment will give students access to higher wages, health and monetary benefits, inclusive communities and work places, and higher job satisfaction (Grigal et al., 2015). Postsecondary education programs provide students with disabilities the self-sufficiency, self-determination, and social skills training and practice needed to be successfully hired in integrated and competitive places of employment. Programs for college students with intellectual disabilities are becoming increasingly popular with more than 800 students enrolled in programs across the nation (Grigal et al., 2015). Sadly, disproportionality related to students from diverse backgrounds impacts these programs. Even though students from diverse backgrounds are overrepresented in the intellectual disability category in K-12 schools, they are underrepresented in postsecondary education programs. Grigal et al. (2015) reports that "the majority of students were white (73%), 15% were black or African American, and 10% were Hispanic or Latino" (p. 2). Since these numbers mirror the percentages of individuals by race/ethnicity in the general population, the disproportional representation of students from diverse backgrounds may not seem that extreme. However, when the data is disaggregated by state, the disproportionality becomes more obvious, especially in states that have a diverse population. For example, in Florida, the most recent data report students from diverse backgrounds comprise more than 50% of K-12 students. However, the percentage of students from diverse backgrounds in Broward County, FL is 74.3%. Based on these percentages, we should expect Florida postsecondary transition programs to have higher percentages of students from diverse backgrounds. The purpose of this study is to determine if that really is the case nationally. We suspect not. The data (i.e., 73% white, 15% black or African American and 10% Hispanic or Latino) reported by Grigal et al. (2015) increases the likelihood we are correct in our suspicions. This leads to the question we are asking in our research. Why are there not more students from diverse backgrounds enrolling and participating in these beneficial, and potentially fully funded, programs? This study seeks answers to this question and to emphasize the need for these programs to create recruitment and retention processes that ensure "equity, opportunity, and inclusion" of students from diverse backgrounds, consistent with the TASH 2017 theme.

Speakers
BJ

Brianna Joseph

Visiting Instructor, Florida Atlantic University
avatar for Kelly Kearney

Kelly Kearney

Florida Atlantic University
People can talk to me about:Inclusive educationMicroenterprisesBehavior analysis


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Enacting Self-Determination: How Adults with IDD and their Siblings Make Decisions
Limited Capacity seats available

As individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are beginning to outlive their parents, siblings are assuming- and are often expected to fulfill- caregiving and other related roles. Such roles are critical in supporting self-determination of individuals with IDD. Yet, most research only focuses on sibling perspectives, thus excluding the viewpoints of individuals with IDD. To address these needs, this study explored how nine adult sibling pairs make decisions concerning employment, independent living, and self-determination. This focus aligns with the conference's "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" theme in that examination of the perspectives of both siblings and individuals with IDD can inform intervention and efforts to promote self-determination and community participation by individuals with IDD and greater sibling involvement in family supports. Implications for future planning and collaboration with siblings will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Meghan Burke

Meghan Burke

Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Zach Rossetti

Zach Rossetti

Associate Professor, Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development
Zachary Rossetti, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Special Education in the Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development. His research examines the experiences of families with children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including autism, by... Read More →



Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Inclusion Outreach: Distance Consultancy to Schools Supporting Inclusive Education for Students with Complex Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusion Outreach (IO) is a multidisciplinary British Columbia Ministry of Education Provincial Outreach Program that supports 120 students with complex support needs to be included in schools throughout the province. IO and Open School BC partnered to develop an e-mentoring project that provides service continuity for these students in an innovative way. Using a Learning Management System (LMS) we have created secure, password protected student-specific websites as information repositories . In addition, using videos, discussion boards, and web conferencing, staff can now connect on a regular basis with parents and the school-based teams that support each student. This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme "Still we Rise for Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion" by describing an approach to build local capacity to support inclusive education that enhances current and future quality of life for students with complex support needs. More information is available at www.inclusionoutreach.ca

Speakers
CJ

Christopher Jenkins

Coordinator, BC Provincial Inclusion Outreach Program
Christopher J. Jenkins, PhD. is Teacher/Coordinator of Inclusion Outreach, a British Columbia Ministry of Education Provincial Outreach Program that supports inclusion for students with multiple and complex needs throughout BC. Chris has had a long and varied career as a teacher... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Key Components Of High Quality Inclusive Post-Secondary Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Post-secondary education opportunities for students with disabilities have become much more available than they used to be and there are now a large number of such initiatives throughout the country. These initiatives differ in their structure and approaches. This session will focus on key components of an inclusive mindset and outline some useful concepts for creating a high quality inclusive post secondary education such as (a) utilization of culturally valued analogues, (b) the necessity of having a deep understanding of the social role of a post secondary student and (c) finding ways to compensate for vulnerabilities to stigma and low expectations; We will look at quality from different perspectives e.g., students, faculty, and family members. As well, barriers and obstacles to quality will be identified and we will engage participants in brainstorming ways to deal with these barriers. This presentation will highlight lessons learned from the Integrated Studies program at Millersville University and the work of the Pennsylvania Inclusive Higher Education Consortium.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Marie Licata

Ann Marie Licata

Director, Pennsylvania Inclusive Higher Education Consortium


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Opportunity to Learn: Providing a Free and Appropriate Education
Limited Capacity seats available

The Endrew vs. Johnson case has provided an excellent stepping stone for re-evaluating what it means to provide students with disabilities with a free and appropriate public education (FAPE).  We propose using our revised Opportunity to Learn construct to help administrators and special eduation directors have a better metric of whether or not they are creating an educational program that would meet the legal requirements of FAPE.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Peer-delivered Strategies to Promote Communication of High School Students in Inclusive Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

Despite research has examined the impact of naturalistic strategies with younger students when the intervention was delivered by adults, little is known about the generalizability of peer-implemented naturalistic strategies when implemented with older students with disabilities. A single-case multiple-probe design across participants was used to evaluate the effect of naturalistic strategies delivered by peers of three high school students with severe disabilities in inclusive classrooms. A paraprofessional served an interventionist, who delivered a brief training to peer partners and provided prompts as needed in each classroom. We collected data on the focus students' independent and prompted initiations and responses toward peers and adults as well as peer partners prompting behaviors. Results indicated a functional relation established between the intervention and increased social communication of the focus students. We will discuss implications and provide recommendations for educational teams who wish to advance the inclusion outcomes of all students.

Speakers
avatar for Yun-Ching Chung

Yun-Ching Chung

Associate Professor, Illinois State University
Yun-Ching Chung is an associate professor in the department of special education at Illinois State University. Her research interests include peer interactions, inclusion outcomes of students who use augmentative and alternative communication, and paraprofessional facilitation.


Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Sexuality: Risk, Rights, and Direct Support Professionals
Limited Capacity filling up

Providing supports concerning a person's sexuality can be an very complicated process that involves careful consideration of equity, opportunity, and inclusion. While many plans may be written, the actual duties of making and enacting complicated decisions often rests in the hands of Direct Support Professionals (DSPs). Despite DSPs central role in our systems of supports, the voices and perspectives of these men and women has not been adequately represented in the literature. In this breakout session the perspectives of 12 men and women with a combined 106 years of experience as DSPs will be presented. Specifically, the words of these participants will be used to explore how they perceive sexuality for people with intellectual disability with regards to navigating the boundaries between risk and rights, safety and empowerment.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:45am

Work Incentive Planning Assistance (WIPA)
Limited Capacity seats available

WIPA (Work Incentive Planning Assistance) is a Social Security Administration program whose mission is to provide the specific work incentives planning and assistance services that will directly assist Social Security beneficiaries to succeed in their return-to-work or in the case of students to join the work force. WINs (Work Incentive Navigators) provide a base level of informational support to all eligible beneficiaries contacting the program and to take significant steps to ensure individuals with all types of disabilities, from every type of diverse ethnic background, and from varying age groups and geographic locations are able to access and benefit from the WIPA program.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Garrett

Linda Garrett

Work Incentive Navigator, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency
Work with individuals receiving disability from SSA helping them understand how working will affect their governmental benefits
avatar for Adrienne Williams

Adrienne Williams

Manager Benefits Coordination, GVRA
Manager of Benefits Coordination for Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) and am also a certified CWIC (Community Work Incentive Coordinator). In this capacity I manage the Social Security funded Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program (WIPA) which assist beneficiaries... Read More →



Thursday December 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Autonomy in More Ways than One
Limited Capacity seats available

Community Living Services (CLS) is a large nonprofit corporation serving persons in Michigan. CLS promotes "community inclusion, full citizenship, and a self-determined life" for nearly 4,000 people of all ages with developmental disabilities. Many adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities are perceived to require assistance from others to help make decisions regarding supports and services received. Often time they are forced to give up their person-hood and autonomy through legal means in order to receive the very supports necessary for them to gain control of their lives. Structural changes within the support system and organizational practices are necessary. This session will describe the alternative support options that preserve autonomy, with emphasis on those that maintain the highest level of freedom and authority for the individual. This session will describe supports that when implemented honestly, act to shift control from the system to the person. The supports covered will include; independent facilitation, person-centered planning, self-determination, individual budgeting, supported decision-making, right of tenancy and fiscal intermediary services. CLS is a legacy organization originally formed 34 years ago to help people move out of state run institutions into the group homes developed in the community. CLS is the largest single "C" Habilitation Supports waiver provider in the state serving people with significant disabilities. CLS has undertaken significant transformation over the past 22 years. In early 1990s CLS oversaw 250 - 6 bed licensed group homes, housing over 1,400 people. In 2017, 85 group homes remain housing 376 people, 1,300 are supported in their own home and the remaining 2,300 are supported within their family. This presentation will describe the policy and organization changes that were made, built on the principles of self-determination, to shift control from provider operated systems and professional guardianship agencies to people who in growing numbers live in homes they own or rent, with housemates and support staff of their choice. Consequently, the changes made in operations have also resulted in CLS being proactively aligned with the HCBS rules. This will also be described during the course of the presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Dohn Hoyle

Dohn Hoyle

Director of Public Policy, The Arc Michigan
Dohn Hoyle is the currently the Director of Public Policy (formerly the Executive Director) of The Arc of Michigan and a long-time advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. A respected leader and innovator in the disability movement, Dohn helped to rewrite the Michigan... Read More →
avatar for Paul Newman

Paul Newman

Chief Operating Officer/Vice President of Operations, Community Living Services, Inc.
Paul Newman is the Chief Operating Officer/Vice President of Operations of Community Living Services, Inc., Michigan.  CLS is a non-profit organization supporting over 4000 people with developmental disabilities in the Southeast Michigan area. Paul has been instrumental in systems... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Capacity Building for People Who Use Keyboards and Letter Boards to Communicate
Limited Capacity filling up

The purpose of this session is to engage in a discussion about building capacity for systems and inclusive environments that support people who type and use letter boards to communicate. Four nonspeaking autistic panelists will share their incredible journeys into learning to use letter boards and keyboards as their primary method of communication, along with the support systems that allowed them to be communicatively successful. The panelists include Tracy Thresher (a self-advocate who was featured in Wretches and Jabberers documentary), Larry Bissonnette (an artist and self-advocate featured in Wretches and Jabberers documentary), Emma Zurcher Long (a teenage self-advocate and blogger at Emma's Hope Book), Rhema Russell (a young self-advocate and blogger at Rhema's Hope) and Diego Pena (a 9 year-old author of bestselling book, Anatomy of Autism). The panelists will share their personal stories and insights into the approaches, supports, and systems that have been put into place to facilitate their inclusion as people who communicate differently. This session will contribute to conversations about the power of access to communication, inclusion, and equitable opportunities for people with autism. Concrete practice and policy recommendations will be discussed with educators and professionals who are increasingly being called to support the communication and educational needs of students with autism. Dr. Edlyn Pena will moderate the panel presentations and a follow-up interactive discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Thresher

Tracy Thresher

Mentor and Communication Consultant, Washington County Mental Health
Tracy Thresher is a native Vermonter who lives and works in Vermont. Tracy began using Facilitated Communication in 1990 and was one of the first individuals with autism in Vermont to be introduced to the method. He has presented at local, statewide and national workshops and conferences... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Co-Creating Individualized Supports with Families and Individuals
Limited Capacity seats available

Shifting from program offerings to individualized supports requires a realignment of relationships between government, providers, families, individuals with disabilities and various community entities. This session explores the contextual and practical aspects that encourage co-created supports as opposed to a delegated service arrangement. Personal and organizational examples of creative support arrangements including paid-neighbors and living near and next to staffing from people and agencies involved in seeking to change the pattern from programs offerings to co-created individualized supports will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Hanns Meissner

Hanns Meissner

CEO, The Arc of Rensselaer County
Organizational Change and Development, Social Innovation, Systems Change, Person-Centered Work


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Effects of Interacting with College Students with Intellectual Disability on Natural Supports
Limited Capacity seats available

The basis for this session is to share the impact of inclusive programs that serve students with intellectual disabilities (ID) on people who do not have disabilities and support each other in their college experiences (Caseboltt & Hodge, 2010; Isso & Shuman, 2013; Rao, 2004). The purpose of this qualitative research was to explore the impact of direct service learning experiences completed during an introductory special education course on a college campus in the southeastern United States. More specifically, researchers examined written reflections of college students who interacted and directly supported individuals with intellectual disability living and participating in various activities within their college community. NVivo was used to analyze and determine attitude changes and interactions towards individuals with ID. The presentation relates specifically to the 2017 TASH conference theme as it highlights truly inclusive community practices while celebrating human rights in a college community that embraces inclusion.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Endrew F defines FAPE: Where do we go from here?
Limited Capacity seats available

Chief Justice Roberts' ruling in Endrew F. makes clear that the essential function of the IEP is academic and functional advancement of the child. School districts must be able to show that the proposed IEP does more than comply with the IDEA's procedural safeguards. Advancing a student from grade to grade is not a true measure of progress - especially when IEP goals are repeated annually and there are no expectations that the child is able to learn. The goals "must be appropriately ambitious " as the true test of the appropriate in FAPE. We will look at some tactics to make Justice Roberts' reasoning a reality in the IEP Team meeting.

Speakers
avatar for Judith Gran

Judith Gran

Judith Gran, Esq. is a partner in the law firm Reisman Carolla Gran LLP, specializing in disability law.  She has a national practice focused on disability rights and has represented clients in more than a half dozen states in disputes over inclusion and community service plans... Read More →
avatar for Frank Laski

Frank Laski

Frank Laski is engaged in a public interest law practice focused on representation of persons with disabilities and their organizations.  He is a former Executive Director of the Massachusetts Mental Health Legal Advisors Committee.  He was also Director of Disability Projects for... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Ransom

Barbara Ransom

A civil rights attorney who represents individuals, families and organizations seeking relief from discrimination on the basis of disability.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Engaging Diverse Communities in a Peer Support Program for Parents of Children with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Effective peer support is an important to the promotion of wellbeing in parents of children with disabilities or special healthcare needs, who may suffer from higher levels of stress due to increased caretaking burden and difficulty navigating systems of care. Parents from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) communities may bear the effects of additional stressors such as; economic instability, language barriers, limited access to disability-related information and lack of social support. Unfortunately, families from culturally and linguistically diverse groups may not reach out to disability organizations for help, and when they do, the support that they receive may not be culturally sensitive and can inadvertently increase stress in the parent. In this session, we describe an evidence-based peer support program, address barriers to serving CLD families and describe some promising practices. Future research needs will also be addressed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Families Supporting Social Inclusion for Their Adult Children: Lessons about Family Research
Limited Capacity filling up

This study determined if approaches and strategies which have been used by agency staff (such as in group homes) to increase social inclusion of adults can also be used by families to increase inclusion for their adult children living at home, or how these strategies need to be adapted for use by families. No such study has been previously conducted in training families in this way and on this topic. Most people with intellectual/developmental disabilities live with their families, yet research with this group is limited. In addition, while children may be included while they are in school, families identify social inclusion as a major issue once their child graduates from school. The study identified barriers in recruiting families, as well as issues that need to be addressed in intervention studies in the family home. For the families who continued through the training/intervention phase of 24-30 months, successful outcomes for their adult children included an increased number of individual friendships with community members, joining community groups and associations, and valued social roles in community life.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Family Correlates of Transition to Employment for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Students with significant disabilities face barriers in obtaining meaningful employment upon exiting the school system (Carter, Austin, & Trainor, 2012). In a national study, only 26% of students with significant disabilities were employed two years after high school (Carter et al., 2012). To develop effective interventions to improve the transition to employment, it is important to identify malleable predictors of employment for students with significant disabilities. To determine correlates of transition variables related to employment, 62 parents of transition-aged youth (ages 14-22) with significant disabilities (i.e. students with intellectual disability, autism, or multiple disabilities, who participated in an alternate assessment) were surveyed. Results indicated that parents with greater empowerment had increased transition knowledge, better family-school partnerships, and less unmet student needs. Parents with greater transition knowledge and/or better family-school partnerships also had less unmet student needs. There was also a positive correlation between the independence of the youth and level of employment knowledge of the parent.

Speakers
avatar for Meghan Burke

Meghan Burke

Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

How Access to Social Capital Shape Special Education Teachers' Jobs
Limited Capacity seats available

Previous research indicates access to social capital and the social ties teachers make with their colleagues, can influence their job efficacy, autonomy, and satisfaction. Specifically, the social ties teachers obtain participating in leadership or mentorship activities may provide opportunities for social network support or access to novel information. However, few research studies have examined this phenomenon with special education teachers, especially teachers working with students with significant disabilities. To that end, this study examined the special education teachers in the School and Staffing Survey of 2011-12 to study how leadership opportunities, through access to social capital, shape special education teachers' job outcomes. We find that leadership and mentorship improves teacher efficacy, satisfaction, and autonomy but that these the relationship is likely moderated by individual and institutional factors such as teaching in a self-contained classroom or in rural communities, respectively.

Speakers
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison`
Andrea Ruppar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her primary research interest is in decision making about curriculum and access to inclusive contexts for students with extensive support... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Inclusive Neighborhood Public School Benefit ALL in the Community - Gathering ALL Parents!
Limited Capacity seats available

Parents and educators from the TASH Inclusive Education Committee will remind us of the true meaning of inclusive education; identify barriers to inclusive neighborhood public schools created by flawed assumptions about student with disabilities, early intervention practices that over-emphasize medically-based approaches, and lack of family engagement; and share success stories. Participants will develop an inclusive education/life vision for their child/student and learn strategies for enlisting diverse inclusive education allies in their own communities.

Speakers
MF

Mary Fisher

Lewis University
avatar for Veronica McGee

Veronica McGee

President, Alabama TASH
I am a parent of a son born with congenital hydrocephalus. Kyle is 18 and is nonverbal and uses both a manual and power chair. This is my 2nd consecutive year to attend TASH. Since my first conference last year in St. Louis, I along with my mentor and friend, Susan Ellis, organized... Read More →
avatar for Barbara J. McKenzie

Barbara J. McKenzie

Chairperson, Ohio TASH
Barb McKenzie is an advocate, presenter, and organizer of gatherings about the importance of creating inclusive communities. The chair of Ohio TASH, she participates on International TASH’s Inclusive Education committee. Barb is the author of “Reflections of Erin – the Importance... Read More →



Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Lives in Classrooms. How Children and Teachers Navigate Learning in Inclusive Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2017, the conference theme "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" is embedded in our work in local schools researching how educators worked together to deliver high quality reading instruction to ALL students. Our research team spent a year with teachers and students in 10 schools and five school districts in Kansas and California to deliver a well-researched emergent literacy program in general education classrooms. We had a front-row seat watching how teachers and students navigated learning academic content. Our study examined how the ELSB program affected and facilitated the development of teacher-students, teacher-teacher, and student-student relationships in small group settings in general education classrooms. We were able to observe how general and special education teachers negotiated their roles, the use of space in the classroom, handled discipline issues, and learned to talk together about their work. As well, we observed how children's relationships changed over time as they got to know each other through participation in specific learning routines. The results affirm the benefits to students and educators when the boundaries between general and special education merge into one.


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Peer Supports: Let's Make it Happen!
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," by providing knowledge necessary to utilize peers as a support in order to successfully include students with significant disabilities in general education classrooms. Peer support can foster opportunities for students with disabilities to be included and engaged in the same activities as their peers. This session explains in detail the step-by-step process of how to set up a peer tutoring system within a school site. During this interactive workshop, five training sessions developed for peer tutors will be explained and essential roles and responsibilities of peer tutors will be discussed. Research conducted by the presenter on peer tutoring will also be shared. This session prepares participants with the tools and resources they need to implement a peer tutoring system at the middle and high school levels, providing students a right to a free and appropriate public education with the supports necessary to be successful.

Speakers
avatar for Yazmin Pineda Zapata, Ed.D.

Yazmin Pineda Zapata, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor, Point Loma Nazarene University
Yazmin Pineda Zapata, Ed.D., is an Assistant Professor at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego, California. Her expertise in delivering special education services has allowed her to advocate for students with varying learning differences in grades K-12. She actively presents... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Brooks, Ph.D.

Rebecca Brooks, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, CSUSM
Dr. Rebecca Brooks is an Assistant Professor in the Special Education teacher preparation and graduate program in the School of Education at California State University San Marcos. She has worked with individuals with disabilities in educational, recreational, vocational, and residential... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Self-Determination: Making It Happen
Limited Capacity seats available

Is it your goal that all students graduate from high school ready for their postschool experience? Making that leap from child to independent adult requires the development and expression of self-determination. Explicit self-determination instruction teaches students ways to fully accept responsibility for their lives and actively participate in their education. Building self-determination is not just a curriculum choice, it's a way of interacting. This session will provide you with: "The research behind self-determination skills," IDEA requirements that support self-determination instruction as a transition initiatives, "Information and strategies to support the state-wide student-led IEP initiative as part of your pre-employment transition services", and research-based strategies and tools that you can use in your interaction with students to build self-determination skills.

Speakers
EJ

Elise James

Other Staff Position Not Listed, GADOE


Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:55am

Training Paraprofessionals to Work in Inclusive Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will include an overview of Communicators: A Paraprofessional Training Program, co-authored by a CHIME SpEd Teacher and SLP, which discusses over 15 practical strategies that paraprofessionsl can immediately implement to better serve the students with whom they support.



Thursday December 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Advocating for Change: Working in Collaboration to Make a Difference
Limited Capacity seats available

Project ACTION! is a regional self-advocacy coalition of adults with developmental disabilities that has been active for over 25 years in DC, MD and VA. As a small advocacy coalition they chose too "Still Rise for Equity, Opportunity and Inclusion" when they did not have any funding to support them to advocate with City Council, attend and travel to local and national conferences, to host training sessions for new self-advocates and more. Self-advocacy and the education of decision makers and government officials is critical to the success of having policies and programs be person-centered and meet the needs of people with disabilities who will use them. The Project ACTION! presenters will share how they have successfully advocated for change in the government system that provides their disability supports over the years. They will share how they choose to work with non-disability coalitions and groups and have a seat at the table so even more people will know about the needs of people with disabilities. The issues and challenges that self-advocates face are issues and challenges for others also who may not have a disability and that's where the cross-issue collaborative can have a great impact.

Speakers
avatar for Phyllis Holton

Phyllis Holton

Deputy Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Curriculum Focus and Instructional Context: What Do Teachers Believe is Important for Secondary Students with Severe Disabilities?
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will focus on special education teachers' beliefs about effective curriculum for high school students with severe disabilities, and the context in which that curriculum is best delivered. Findings from a recent study will serve as the basis for discussion about how to prepare teachers to make curricular decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Stacy Dymond

Stacy Dymond

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Stacy Dymond is professor of special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on curriculum issues related to educating secondary and transition-age students with severe intellectual disabilities in inclusive school and community settings... Read More →
avatar for Shari Hopkins

Shari Hopkins

Assistant Professor, Western Oregon University


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Designing a Universal Design for Learning Lab, Lessons Learned for P-20 Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

Designing a Universal Design for Learning Lab, Lessons Learned for P-20 Inclusion Kennesaw State University has recently opened a Universal Design for Learning Lab (UDLab), which is a model classroom equipped with innovative high and low technology to assist learners in accessing curriculum and instruction. The goal for this breakout presentation is for TASH advocates to explore high-leverage practices of assistive technology and Universal Design to support full inclusion of diverse learners across the P-20 trajectory. Session participants engage in hands-on experiential learning of a wide variety of technologies that provide access to opportunities for all students, particularly those students of color with disabilities. While the University provides program accessibility and accommodations for persons with disabilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Georgia Legislature has increased its focus on programming specific to Inclusive Post-secondary Education. The primary goal of the UDLab is for every preservice or inservice teacher who graduates from KSU to be knowledgeable about Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology (QIAT) and how emerging, innovation, and assistive technologies help prepare ALL students. The 2016 U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reported that 12.9% of children with disabilities between the ages 6- 21 years old were served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in 2013-14. NCES also indicated that Georgia recorded 162,884 served under IDEA, which is approximately 7% of Georgia's public school population. The UDLab hosted 582 visitors from within and outside of the KSU community during the inception year, 2016-17. Visitor feedback consisted of the following comments: learned about new topics that cover transition services, advocacy, assistive technology, digital divide... "Every university should be availed the opportunity to have a universal design for learning model classroom as a resource for educational access for students with disabilities. Participants of this conference breakout session will take a simulated tour of the UDLab with an opportunity to explore a selection of devices and application software that will be set up in stations for rotation to experience high and low assistive technology. A presentation of Virtual Reality Learning (Ludlow, 2015) will be shared to support diverse learning styles. Goggles, headsets and iPod Touch technology will provide virtual reality experiences for participants. Participants will learn how to enhance student success with Assistive Technology tools and strategies to support personalized learning. The session is designed to support teachers in promoting equity, opportunity and inclusion of all learners across the P-20 trajectory.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Empowering Family-Professional Partnerships Through Cultural Reciprocity
Limited Capacity seats available

Professionals who strive to collaborate with families, particularly those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, are encouraged to ask: "How can I go beyond cultural awareness to be truly culturally responsive in my practice with families?" In this question, there is a realization that professionals need to go beyond mere recognition of differences in language, race, ethnicity, communication styles (i.e., overt and covert level of awareness) to a recognition of differences in values, belief, principles, etc. that defines who we are (i.e., subtle level of awareness). This presentation will share how professionals can use "a posture of cultural reciprocity" (Kalyanpur & Harry, 2012) to explore these subtle cultural differences to become more responsive, collaborative partners with individuals who have disabilities and their families. This "posture of cultural reciprocity" approach involves: 1) identifying the cultural values, beliefs and/or assumptions embedded in one's interpretation of an individual's disability, in one's particular recommendation(s) for services/practice, in one's interactions with a family, other professionals, etc.; 2) finding out whether the family recognizes and holds the same beliefs, values and/or assumptions. If not, finding out how their views differ; 3) acknowledging and explicitly respecting any cultural differences identified and fully explaining the cultural basis for one's professional beliefs/assumptions; and 4) through discussion and collaboration, determining the most effective way to adapt one's professional interpretations or recommendations to the value system of the family. During the presentation, participants who are professionals will be asked to think of a situation or interaction with a family/parent when they recommended a particular course of action or had a particular priority or vision for a student/consumer. Participants who are parents/family members will be asked to think of a particular course of action or a particular priority or vision that they had for their child/family member with a disability. Then each participant will use a personal identity web to help articulate aspects of their own identity/ affiliations (e.g., nationality/culture, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, religion, exceptionality/ non-exceptionality, professional education, etc.) that may contribute to values and beliefs underlying their recommendations, priorities, and/or vision and to share these with another participant. The purpose of this activity is to assist family members and professionals to envision how this process can empower their partnerships. Finally, we will brainstorm possible barriers to the implementation of this "posture of cultural reciprocity" for both professionals and families as well as possible ways to overcome these barriers for each step of the process/approach. Kalyanpur, M. & Harry, B. (2012). Cultural reciprocity in special education: Building family-professional relationships.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Gonsier-Gerdin

Jean Gonsier-Gerdin

Professor, Teaching Credentials-Special Education, California State University, Sacramento


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Firsthand College Experiences from Young Adults with Intellectual Disability and Natural Supports
Limited Capacity seats available

This interactive session full of personal stories will provide participants with: (a) national snapshot of postsecondary program options for individuals with intellectual disability); (b) a brief overview of program components for one model demonstration postsecondary program in North Carolina; and (c) first hand college experiences directly shared from individual students and natural supports participating in the postsecondary education program. All audience members are welcome to attend. The presentation relates specifically to the 2017 TASH conference theme as it highlights truly inclusive community practices while celebrating human rights in a college community that embraces inclusion.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Healthy Relationships and Abuse Prevention for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Healthy relationship education is a widely accepted primary intervention for preventing abuse (Foshee et al., 2004; Wolfe et al., 2009). For people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), it is particularly significant due to their much higher risk for experiencing abuse than those without disabilities (e.g., Brownridge, 2006; Cohen, Forte, Du Mont, Hyman, & Romans, 2006; Coker, Smith, & Fadden, 2005; Sedlak et al., 2010; Sobsey, 1994; VanCleave & Davis, 2006; ). This session will review the Leadership for Empowerment and Abuse Prevention (LEAP) curriculum created by the Partnership for People with Disabilities at Virginia Commonwealth University in collaboration with people with I/DD. The key components of the curriculum, the training model implemented, and the evaluation tools developed will be discussed in the presentation. LEAP is a four module training series that teaches people with IDD about abuse prevention. The LEAP curriculum involved people with IDD from its creation to its training implementation. Over 500 people with IDD have been trained in Virginia. Video-based evaluation tools have been developed and implemented to evaluate the curriculum. Virginia's DD agency is interested in integrating LEAP in the service delivery system. Abuse prevention strategies for individuals with IDD includes access to education and training so that individuals feel equipped with the knowledge to make healthy decisions. Providing healthy relationship training for people with IDD is an essential tool to allow their voices to be heard. Providing evidence to evaluate if the training curriculum was effectively communicated and understood by participants is essential to empowering people with IDD to foster healthy relationships in the community. Abuse prevention and relationship education curriculum should meet the needs of people with IDD to provide them with the best possible tools to become self-advocates in their relationships and communities.

Speakers
avatar for Jack Brandt

Jack Brandt

Disability Policy Specialist, Partnership for People with Disabilities at VCU
Jack Brandt is the Disability Policy Specialist for the Partnership for People with Disabilities at Virginia Commonwealth University, a position he has held since 2010. Mr. Brandt was a Disability Rights Advocate at the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy from 2008 to 2010... Read More →
AD

Allison D'Aguilar

Graduate Student, VCU
I am a trainer for the Leadership and Empowerment for Abuse Prevention project. LEAP provides training to people with disabilities, by people with disabilities on healthy relationships and abuse prevention.
avatar for Donna Gilles

Donna Gilles

Associate Professor/Exec. Director, Virginia Commonwealth University/ Partnership for People with Disabilities


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

How does it all work?: A Framework for Supporting Access to the General Curriculum in General Education Classes
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

A grounded theory which explains the interrelated systems supporting access to the general curriculum in general education contexts for students with significant disabilities will be presented. Based on a multiple case study of secondary literacy classes, we report the individual and social processes in which teachers and teams engage to support students' access to general education content in general education classes. Participants will learn how to identify factors in their own schools or districts which might be influencing students' access to the general curriculum positively or negatively.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison`
Andrea Ruppar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her primary research interest is in decision making about curriculum and access to inclusive contexts for students with extensive support... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

How to Navigate the Criminal Justice System
Limited Capacity seats available

People with disabilities are disproportionately entangled in every aspect of the criminal justice system and face unique challenges as victims of crimes or as suspects of crimes with disabilities. Representatives from The Arc's National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD) will educate self-advocates and family members about what to do when they find themselves facing criminal justice involvement. Topics include: contacting community resources; an overview of NCCJD; the accommodations process under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); basic disability rights laws; and concrete tips and strategies for navigating the criminal justice system.

Speakers
avatar for Ariel Simms

Ariel Simms

Program Manager & Attorney, Criminal Justice Initiatives, The Arc of the United States
Ariel Simms is the Program Manager & Attorney, Criminal Justice Initiatives, for The Arc's National Center on Criminal Justice & Disability (NCCJD). In this role, she advocates for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who become entangled in the criminal justice... Read More →
avatar for TAYLOR WOODARD

TAYLOR WOODARD

Program Associate, National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability
Informed by her own experiences with a disability and driven by a passion to advocate for people with I/DD, Taylor Woodard left a lucrative position on Wall Street in 2010. Returning to her home state of Texas, she pursued dual-master’s degrees from The University of Texas-Austin’s... Read More →



Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Pathways to Careers: Making the Case for Employment First
Limited Capacity seats available

Pathways to Careers is a customized employment initiative that has been piloted in partnership with four nonprofit service provider agencies. Mathematica Policy Research has been collecting and evaluating data from the pilot sites, including looking at individual outcomes, impact, costs savings and replicability to understand the broader implications and sustainability of this customized employment approach. Findings from the evaluation indicate that the investment of resources and time needed to establish the infrastructure and provide more comprehensive services is resulting in significant societal benefits including quality employment outcomes for participants, cost savings at the Federal and state levels and increased community engagement. Join us for a more quantitative look at Employment First in practice.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Callahan

Michael Callahan

President, Marc Gold & Associates
Customized Employment, Discovery, Job Development, Systematic Instruction, consulting, certification, inclusive community planning
avatar for Therese Fimian

Therese Fimian

Director Competitive Integrated Employment Programs, SourceAmerica Pathways to Careers
Therese Fimian has worked in the disability and employment field for over 20 years, establishing and overseeing national workforce programs, research, and demonstration projects that promote economic empowerment and self-sufficiency for individuals with disabilities. Therese’s work... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

The NJC Communication Bill of Rights: Overcoming Myths That Limit Opportunity
Limited Capacity seats available

The National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of Persons with Severe Disabilities (NJC) NJC is made up of a representatives from eight member organizations (including TASH), and focuses on research, policy, practice, and education to advocate for individuals with significant communication support needs resulting from intellectual disability, that may coexist with autism, sensory and/or motor limitation. In 1992, the NJC published an original Communication Bill of Rights that was used widely to advocate for communication services and supports for persons with severe disabilities. In 2016, the NJC revised the Communication Bill of Rights to reflect of broader range of potential communication purposes and focus more on communication for the purposes of socialization, building relationships, and self-advocacy. The 2016 Communication Bill of Rights is based on the understanding that "All people with a disability of any extent or severity have a basic right to affect, through communication, the conditions of their existence. Beyond this general right, a number of specific communication rights should be ensured in all daily interactions and interventions involving persons who have severe disabilities. To participate fully in communication interactions, each person has [many] fundamental communication rights." In spite of these clearly articulated rights, myths regarding communication for persons with severe disabilities often limit access to communication and opportunities to learn to communicate. For example, it is commonly believed that individuals who were unable to learn reading, writing, and communication in childhood are unable to learn as adults. Yet, new technologies, instructional strategies, and contexts (daily activities and communication partners) have emerged since the time that today's adults were children. Learning is still very possible. In fact, a number of studies have shown that individuals with severe disabilities continue to develop communication and language skills well into their adult years and make measurable gains when provided with appropriate communication services. The purpose of this presentation is to review the NJC Communication Bill of Rights, the myths that limit opportunity to communicate and learn to communicate, and the research that contradicts myths. In doing so, this presentation links directly to the theme of the 2017 TASH conference, Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion, by providing participants with critical language and documentation they can use to support everyone's right to communicate.


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

The Voices of Parents: Integrated Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Amid the many changes in one's life, the importance of family is constant and consistently critical across the lifespan. The expectations of families have a powerful influence on the success and employment outcomes of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). The employment rate for individuals with a cognitive disability in Tennessee is chronically low, with only 17.9% of working-age adults (age 16-64 years) employed (American Community Survey, 2014). In an effort toward expanding access to integrated, inclusive, equitable employment opportunities, it is important that we as a field understand the expectations, needs, and desires of parents and family members who often serve as a lifelong source of support for adults with IDD. Our presentation, entitled "The Voices of Parents: Perspectives on Integrated Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities," explores the expectations, preferences, concerns, and resource needs of 1,738 parents of adults with IDD related to various employment options (i.e., full- and part-time sheltered employment, full- and part-time integrated employment). We found that parents prioritized paid community employment over sheltered options and such expectations were strongly associated with the employment status of their child. Additionally, parents valued qualitative aspects of the workplace (e.g., personal satisfaction, social interaction opportunities) more highly than common employment outcome metrics (e.g., rate of pay, hours). We found multiple factors that shaped both parental expectations and the extent to which their children had been employed in the community, including disability type, disability severity, race/ethnicity, and gender. Most parents reported having limited familiarity with programs across every domain we asked about (e.g., residential, vocational, postsecondary). The extent to which parents indicated various types of information would be helpful varied by demographic factors (e.g., son or daughter's age, disability diagnosis, or socioeconomic status), as did avenues through which they indicated they were most likely to access information and resources. We offer recommendations aimed at equipping parents with relevant supports and resources to guide their son or daughter's journey across the life span. Our presentation will provide recommendations for research and practice aimed at raising expectations for and access to inclusive, equitable community employment for individuals with IDD.

Speakers
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University
Erik is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Special Education at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He completed his doctoral work in the area of severe disabilities at Vanderbilt University and his undergraduate work in Christian Education at Wheaton College. His research... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:00pm

Together Including Every Student (TIES)
Limited Capacity seats available

Together Including Every Student (TIES) promotes the participation of children and young adults who have developmental disabilities in extracurricular, recreational and community activities by creating effective natural support. Participants and their families have the opportunity to join any inclusive activity of their choice with the natural support of a peer. Each trained peer receives an individual support plan with strategies on how to best support the participant.

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Costello

Kathy Costello

TIES Program Director, Starbridge
Kathy Costello created Together Including Every Student (TIES) in 1997 in two school districts. TIES is currently in 45 school districts and communities. She is the parent of an adult who has a developmental disability. Kathy also is Chairperson of Christopher's Challenge whose... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:50pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Access to Communication Brings Community, Comaraderie, Change and Curiosity
Limited Capacity seats available

Ian Nordling, Tom Pruyn, Huan Pham, Matthew Lager and other members of Growing Kids Therapy Center's "Tribe" are young adults with non-speaking autism who spell to communicate. This pack of close-knit friends meet frequently to learn, advocate and support each other. They'll share their life changing stories about how finally being able to communicate is allowing them to break down barriers. Their accomplishments the past year include: *Participation in college course with neurotypicals Gen Zers *Community Outreach *Local Government Advocacy *Partnership with local school *Presentation at community events *Deepened friendships and strengthened relationships with family There is much more work to be done and while these spellers face challenges everyday they are determined to keep pushing society to include them. They want to partner with others so they can continue to shatter the barriers and misconceptions facing those who spell to communicate.


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Count Me In! Overcoming Barriers to Inclusion for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

This interactive skill-building session presents research-informed practices fundamental to successful integration and inclusion (membership, affiliation and equal opportunity) for students with autism and low incidence disabilities. Major barriers to the inclusion of these students within school settings and practical strategies for overcoming those barriers will be highlighted. Tactics that foster students' active engagement, positive performance, personal autonomy, and mutual participation WITH typical peers, within and across general education settings, will additionally be illustrated and discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Writer

Jan Writer

Benedictine University
Jan Writer is the Director of Student Placement at Benedictine University and an adjunct professor of Special Education at National Louis University. She is also the Principal Consultant for Visions & Dreams, an independent agency that provides technical assistance, training, and... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Creating a Virginia Center for Inclusive Practices at Radford University
Limited Capacity seats available

We need your voice and your thoughts! We want to develop a Center for Inclusive Practices at Radford University to serve the Commonwealth of Virginia. As we study how best to go about this, we need to hear from a variety of people with a variety of perspectives. We hope to include general and special education teachers, parents of children with disabilities, youth with disabilities, adult advocates, like-minded university professionals and other stakeholders. This presentation will present the results of our interviews and surveys to date and use a variety of audience interactions to gather your input and advice.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Altieri

Elizabeth Altieri

Professor, Radford University
I am passionate about inclusion. I have been an advocate and supporter of Inclusive Education and Community since the 1970s and first joined TASH in 1979. I have teaching and administrative experience with inclusive programs for school-aged students and adults with disabilities dating... Read More →
avatar for Darren W Minarik

Darren W Minarik

Assistant Professor, Radford University
Darren Minarik, Ph.D. has spent 25 years in education supporting inclusive practices that open opportunities for young people and adults to become active, responsible, and independent citizens. As a member of Radford University’s teacher education faculty, Darren prepares current... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Exploring Independent Living Through the Lens of Individuals With Disabilities
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Since deinstitutionalization in the 1970s, there has been a growing emphasis on independent living for people with disabilities. However, the concept of independent living remains ambiguous. For some, it represents a residential placement, but for others it represents a philosophy and movement toward equity, opportunity, and inclusion. As a philosophy and movement, scant research explores the perspectives of people with disabilities and how they define independent living. As a residential placement, current research indicates that independent living remains elusive for many youth and adults with disabilities. The National Longitudinal Transition Study-Wave 3 data indicate that 72.6% of youth with disabilities live with their parents after high school, only 9.9% live alone, and 0.5% live in a group home or assisted living facility (Test, Mazzotti et al., 2009). Adults experience similar outcomes, with 78% living with family members, 9% in group homes of six or fewer people and 7% in their own homes or apartments. Although the majority of individuals with disabilities live at home, those that live in small agency residences, with roommates, or on their own report higher levels of life satisfaction, improved financial outcomes, and more meaningful personal relationships. New approaches are needed to better understand how people with diverse abilities and backgrounds define independent living. Additionally, more information is needed on the types of supports, resources, and services they either currently use or require to live as independently as possible. One promising approach to facilitate these discussions is community conversations (Carter et al., 2009). Community conversations use the World Café model (Brown & Isaacs, 2005) to bring diverse stakeholders together to address barriers facing their community. Attendees generate innovative, solutions-focused ideas over a series of small and large-group conversations, and build relationships to support sustainable action after the event. This presentation focuses on "community conversations"€ as a practical approach to bringing together a diverse cross-section of people with disabilities to understand their independent living perspectives, needs, and experiences. We partnered with the Tennessee Center for Independent Living (CIL), Empower Tennessee, to host community conversations in five geographically and economically diverse communities in our state. We asked attendees to answer the following questions (a) What does independent living mean to you?, (b) What resources, supports, and services are you currently using to achieve your vision of independent living?, and (c) What resources, supports, and services do you need to achieve your vision of independent living? We also gathered participant demographic data, participant perspectives on the event, and participant satisfaction with current supports in a variety of domains of independent living (e.g., transportation, employment, housing, social relationships, spiritual life, self-care, political participation). We will share our findings from these five community conversation events as well as strategies stakeholders might adopt to identify and support the independent living goals of people with disabilities in their own communities.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer L. Bumble

Jennifer L. Bumble

Doctoral Student, Vanderbilt University
Jennifer Bumble, M.Ed. is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked as a special educator in Texas and an ESL educator in South Korea. Jennifer also worked as an educational consultant with the Vanderbilt... Read More →
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University
Erik is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Special Education at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He completed his doctoral work in the area of severe disabilities at Vanderbilt University and his undergraduate work in Christian Education at Wheaton College. His research... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Fiduciary Ownership as the Foundation of Independent Living for Adults with ID/DD
Limited Capacity seats available

Our presentation will review our program's process in assisting students with ID/DD to master their personal finances. This is seen as a major step in achieving and maintaining independent living. Additionally, students managing their finances successfully means they can integrate themselves into the community by sustaining their own housing and actively making their own purchases in the community. First we will address barriers that our students commonly face when they first begin to work towards managing their personal finances. This involves inexperience with money management, banking, budgeting and making purchases. Second, we will explain available resources offered by our program to assist our students. This includes budget classes, one-on one meetings, interactive budget workshops and real world practice in managing their money. Third, we will explain the natural consequences our students face when they do not manage their personal finances successfully and how this is an integral part of the learning process. Lastly, we will explain how successful personal finance management will lead our students towards their ultimate goal: becoming the primary managers of their money by becoming their own representative payee.

Speakers
avatar for Jasmin Rocha

Jasmin Rocha

Residential Coordinator, Wayfinders at Fresno State
My name is Jasmin Rocha and I am the residential coordinator for the Wayfinders Program at Fresno State. I am passionate about working with our post secondary students to learn the skills to lead independent and fulfilling lives. A special interest of mine is assisting our students... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Getting Communication Going with Partner Assisted Auditory Scanning
Limited Capacity seats available

For individuals who struggle with traditional AAC access methodologies (direct selection, switch scanning, eye gaze, etc.), the strategy of Partner Assisted Auditory Scanning (PAAS) is often an overlooked access strategy that can have significant and immediate results for children and adults with complex communication needs. Using this strategy, individuals who otherwise struggle to communicate their opinions, thoughts and intelligence can be offered an opportunity to develop a full communication repertoire in just a single session. Too often, access training (the how of accessing AAC) and navigation/language system orientation (the organization of vocabulary in an AAC layout) are attempted to be taught simultaneously. With PAAS, children and adults with complex communication needs can focus first on communicating without needing to also struggle with the motor skills involved in accessing AAC. As presented by an SLP/AAC Specialist, this session will feature videos, case studies and opportunities for participants to practice partner assisted auditory scanning.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Inclusive Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities in Georgia through Collective Impact
Limited Capacity filling up

Inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) programs on the campuses of colleges and universities is a growing movement in the education of young adults with intellectual disabilities. Making IPSE available to students in Georgia is at the forefront of the Georgia Inclusive Postsecondary Education Consortium's (GAIPSEC) efforts. This session will share how the partnerships between Georgia's UCEDDs, DD Council and VR have increased postsecondary options for students with ID in Georgia through the framework of collective impact. The Center for Leadership in Disability (CLD) has been the backbone organization. Along with the CLD, the DD Council, VR and other organizations shared a common agenda, collected data and measured results consistently, and participated in mutually reinforcing activities.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Brady

Kate Brady

Deputy Director, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities
Kate Brady, PhD ABD is Deputy Director at the Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) — a federally funded, independent state agency that advocates on behalf of Georgians and families living with developmental disabilities. Brady brings two decades of work in the field... Read More →
avatar for Eric Jacobson

Eric Jacobson

Eric E. Jacobson is the executive director of the Georgia Council of Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) - a federally funded, independent state agency that advocates on behalf of Georgians and families living with developmental disabilities.  Jacobson leads GCDD on its mission to... Read More →
avatar for Susanna Miller-Raines

Susanna Miller-Raines

Operations Coordinator, Center for Leadership in Disability
Susanna Miller-Raines, MSW is the Operations Coordinator for the Center for Leadership in Disability in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University. She is the Statewide Coordinator for the Georgia Inclusive Postsecondary Education Consortium, is the Project Coordinator... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Partnering in Student Success
Limited Capacity seats available

Partnering in Student Success - Through a partnership within and across agencies, the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) in conjunction with Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) are supporting students to be college and career ready. The implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) has been the stimulus for the transformation. With the expanded work, the Divisions for Special Education Services and Supports and Career, Technical and Agricultural Education have partnered with GVRA and Tools for Life to provide supports to students and their families.

Speakers
EJ

Elise James

Other Staff Position Not Listed, GADOE
avatar for Anne Ladd

Anne Ladd

Family Engagement Specialist, Georgia Department of Education
Anne Ladd is the Family Engagement Specialist for the Ga Department of Education, Division for Special Education Services and Supports. Previously, Ms. Ladd served as a Parent Mentor for Gwinnett County Public schools for 8 years. Ms. Ladd is a Graduate of the University of Georgia... Read More →
WL

Wina Low

Coordinator - Special Education, Division for Special Education Services and Supports


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Preparing Professionals from Botswana, Africa to Teach Students with Significant Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, we will share the personnel preparation sessions conducted to share information with 12 special education teachers and two administrators from Botswana, Africa. The content included teaching students with severe disabilities functional skills, literacy, PBIS, communication skills, inclusion and early intervention. Strategies to work with international professionals will be shared. Perspectives on their view of inclusion and the education of students with severe disabilities will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Karina Cooper-Duffy

Karina Cooper-Duffy

Profession in Special Education, Western Carolina University


Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:05pm

Self-Determination in Leisure Activities
Limited Capacity seats available

The Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis is a not-for-profit organization that promotes and supports leisure opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. It is the belief of the Recreation Council that all people have the right to play and pursue their interests in their community, regardless of their ability and support needs. The Recreation Council provides information and referral services and funding to allow for self-determination and choice in their leisure aspirations.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Fleming

Susan Fleming

Executive Director, Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis
Susan Fleming serves as the Executive Director of the Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis, a not-for-profit organization that works to promote and support recreation opportunities for individuals with disabilities who reside in the Greater St. Louis area. Susan has worked in... Read More →
avatar for Peggy Welker, LMSW

Peggy Welker, LMSW

St. Louis County Coordinator, Recreation Council of Greater St. Louis
I am a parent recently graduated with my Masters in Social Work. I have volunteered and worked in the social services field since 2007 when my youngest child who has disabilities entered kindergarten. As the St. Louis County Coordinator for the Recreation Council I have the opportunity... Read More →



Thursday December 14, 2017 2:05pm - 2:55pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

COME TO LIFE: PRIORITIZING WHAT MATTERS MOST
Limited Capacity seats available

Co-author of "Come to Life: Your Guide to Self-Discovery", Tom Iland will tell the story of his journey to becoming a self-advocate and describe why he left a career as a CPA to help people affected by autism and other disabilities full-time. This presentation also helps parents and professionals focus on key concepts and support the self-awareness, self-acceptance and self-advocacy skills of their children or students.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas ILAND

Thomas ILAND

THOMAS ILAND is a self-advocate, diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder at the age of 13. He has worked hard to overcome many challenges. His achievements include graduating from California State University Northridge, becoming a Certified Public Accountant, and working in corporate... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Iland

Thomas Iland

Autism Self-Advocate, Author & Keynote Speaker
Thomas Iland was diagnosed with autism at 13 years old and has worked hard to achieve his goals: driving, living on his own, graduating from college, finding work and having a girlfriend. A certified public accountant (CPA), Thomas recently left the field of accounting in order to... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Creating the Change We Need: Leadership Training for Self-Advocates
Limited Capacity seats available

Project ACTION! is a successful established self-advocacy group in Washington, DC. Current leaders realized that there needed to be many more self-advocacy leaders if they were going to address all of the issues they hear about at meetings AND if they were going to create needed changes. Therefore, they developed a six-month leadership training program and recruited current and potential members interested in taking charge of their lives and making changes that are important to them. Some changes related to programs, services and systems. Other changes focused on relationships, attitudes of others, limited opportunities and not being treated with respect. Initial sessions focused on Finding Your Voice, Identifying Issues that are Important to You, and Taking Charge of Your Life. Later sessions focused on Running and Participating in Meetings, Serving on Boards, Talking So That People Will Listen, and the many roles played by self-advocates. Some of the training involved fun interactive role-playing, so that people could practice and learn in a safe non-threatening place. New self-advocates were paired with more experienced self-advocacy leaders, who could help them practice new skills and build their confidence. Project ACTION! has always wanted to mentor the next generation of self-advocates. These leadership academies were a great start in identifying and supporting younger self-advocates so that they can move into leadership positions. In this interactive session, self-advocates and supporters can learn approaches from each other.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Cultural Brokers: Catalyst for System Change to Improve Service Access for Culturally Linguistically Diverse Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Navigating the systems of care is so daunting that many families coming from culturally linguistically diverse (CLD) do not know where to turn. Cultural brokering model has become the best-practice in bridging the communication and cultural gaps in addressing the needs of CLD community. This interactive workshop will help participants learn about the implementation of the cultural brokering model at the Federation for Children with Special Needs in Boston, which is a house for one of the oldest Parent Training and Information Centers in the States.

Speakers
OB

Oanh Bui

Federation for Children with Special Needs
Oanh Bui has firsthand experience advocating for appropriate services for her child. She has worked closely with different stakeholders to share knowledge and empower parents using the cultural brokering model.
avatar for O. Sophia Johansson

O. Sophia Johansson

Chair, Board of Directors, Mass Families Organizing for Change
I serve as Board Chair of a family organization, Mass Families Organizing for Change. Our mission is to provide sustained advocacy and leadership training in pursuit of high quality, individualized community support and service options, including family support, for people with disabilities... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Effects of Embedding Trials in a Shared Reading on the Behaviors of Students with Significant Cognitive Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

Teaching academic instruction to students with significant cognitive disabilities (SCD) has been done with success over the past years (Browder, Mims, Spooner, Ahlgrim-Delzell, & Lee, 2008; Hudson & Test, 2011; Mims, Hudson, & Browder, 2012). However, research is scarce and further instructional strategies are needed to help align the standard-based curriculum for this population of students (Browder, Ahlgrim-Delzell, Flowers, & Baker, 2012). The academic inclusion of students with SCD has been a topic of interest for researchers over the past few decades. In 1997, research on teaching academics to students with SCD was scarce (Nietupski, Hamre-Nietupski, Curtin, Shrikanth, 1997). The individuals with disabilities act (IDEA) was reauthorized in 1997, to require that all students with disabilities to have access to the general curriculum (IDEA, 1997). In 2001, No Child Left Behind was passed (NCLB, 2001), which made sure that all students are successful and held the schools accountable for the success of all students. These movements have prompted many researchers to investigate different instructional strategies to deliver instruction better and more specifically, academic instruction such as reading (Browder, Wakeman, Spooner, Ahlgrim-Delzell, & Algozzine, 2005), math (Browder, Spooner, Ahlgrim-Delzell, Harris, & Wakeman,, 2007), and science (Courtade, Spooner, & Browder, 2007) to students with SCD. With the passing of Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA, 2015), the importance of teaching academic instruction to students with SCD is still eminent. Based on the findings from the research, systematic prompting (Mims, Hudson, & Browder, 2012) and embedded instruction (Jimenez & Kamei, 2015) have been used as effective instructional strategies for students with SCD. The research also strongly suggests the use of shared stories to deliver academic instruction to students with SCD is also very effective (Hudson, et al., 2015; Mims, et al., 2012; Spooner et al. 2014). This study will add to the research by using systematic prompting to teach pivotal skills embedded in an adapted literature shared reading book, to examine the effects of this intervention on the acquisition of skills, listening comprehension, and behaviors of students with SCD. It is expected that this study will provide further support to the existing literature, and also provide another instructional strategy for teachers to use when working with students with SCD. A single subject multiple probe baseline design across participants will be used examine the occurrence of a functional relationship between the independent and each of the dependent variables. The results of the study will discuss the effects of the independent variable on three dependent variables: pivotal skill acquisition, listening comprehension, and behaviors of the students, as well as examine the effects of this intervention on the ability of the students to maintain and generalize the dependent variables over time and across settings. The social validity of this intervention will also be assessed through a survey send to the teachers, parents, and students.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Factors Associated with Successful Independent Community Living by Adults with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

While postsecondary programs for young adults with intellectual disability are becoming more common, many have not analyzed associated long-term factors that foster positive outcomes related to inclusive community living. This presentation will share community living survey results conducted with families of recent graduates of postsecondary education programs across 10 states. The session will highlight key aspects for creating and sustaining positive outcomes for independent and inclusive community living. The content relates specifically to the 2017 TASH conference theme as it highlights truly inclusive community living while honoring human rights that foster inclusion.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Five Strategies for Expanding and Generalizing Requesting Among Individuals With Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Teaching students with significant disabilities how to independently request can be a significant challenge for practitioners working with students who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This presentation outlines five strategies that practitioners can use to help students with complex communication needs generalize requesting behaviors across people, stimuli, and settings. These strategies are presented as a menu of options from which practitioners can pick and choose, including: (a) introducing and training others to use natural consequences, (b) using a variety of examples and teaching "loosely", (c) exposing students to variable access to requested items, (d) programing common items in the training area (e.g., classroom), and (e) providing a consistent communication system. When practitioners plan for generalization of requesting among their students, they can select one or more strategies from the menu to encourage their students' successful generalization of these communication requests.

Speakers
NA

Natalie Andzik

Assistant Professor, Northern Illinois University


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Outreach to Diverse Communities: How and Why
Limited Capacity seats available

In the over 65 years that The Arc has been in existence, our success has continually been our ability to understand and meet the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. In that time, not only has The Arc grown into a network of over 650 chapters across the country, but has also grown in terms of how we react and remain flexible in the environment we live, work and advocate in. As the diversity of the population of the country shifts and changes, so to do the people who need our support. As the workforce we need to effectively meet the needs of people with I/DD and their families becomes increasingly diverse, so to must our chapters become more adept at recognizing that diversity is everywhere (in their clients, communities and chapters); it is inevitable and it is beneficial. This session will explore not only why chapters need to develop an effective community outreach strategy, but also present tools and resources for broadening outreach and achieving inclusion. We will explore the concept of intersectionality as it relates to our chapters and our staff recognizing everything a person is. Best practices from chapters and/or other organization will also be offered.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn Cooper

Dawn Cooper

Manager of Diversity and Cultural Competency, The Arc
Dawn Cooper, Manager, Diversity and Cultural Competency at The Arc of the United States, is responsible for developing and implementing The Arc’s strategic plan for creating greater diversity within our chapters and ensuring we are effectively meeting the needs of a diverse I/DD... Read More →



Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Resource Mapping: A Tool for Achieving Employment Outcomes and Financial Goals
Limited Capacity seats available

Join National Disability Institute as we explore Resource Mapping and the impact it has to enhance employment outcomes for individuals and the community providers that support them. Resource mapping offers a strategy that can help organizations view the larger picture of supports and resources that are available to help individuals improve their employment and financial outcomes. Rather than programs and resources being isolated from one another, mapping allows us to work holistically with other community resources to assist individuals in meeting their goals. This session will define resource mapping, provide tools so you can complete a resource map for your area, and identify key resources to include in your local resource map that will support equity and opportunities for people to meet their financial and career goals.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Boutot

Nancy Boutot

National Disability Institute
Customized Employment, Discovery, Social Security Work Incentives, living with depression


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Striving to Ensure Real Homes for People with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Real Inclusion in Community Living begins with having a Real Home. Almost twenty years after the United States Supreme Court's decision in Olmstead v. L.C., people with disabilities continue to strive towards equal rights and opportunities, including the right to a home in the most integrated setting appropriate to one's needs. This interactive discussion will focus on what makes a real home. It will provide an overview of the challenges people with disabilities face in transitioning from institutionalized settings to the community. Self-advocates will share their experiences of conducting a housing search, provide information about housing rights for people with disabilities, and discuss self-advocacy housing search tips and strategies. The presentation will provide you with what you need to know to find a real home to rent or own and how to self-advocate for housing.

Speakers
avatar for Julie Kegley

Julie Kegley

Senior Staff Attorney/Program Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
avatar for Cheri Mitchell

Cheri Mitchell

Advocate/Member, GA Advocacy Office/ People First of GA
Cheri Mitchell is first and foremost a Self-Advocate. She has spent the last twenty years working on behalf of people with disabilities and people who are elderly, and mentoring and supporting self-advocates across Georgia and the nation. She is dedicated to helping people get out... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Supporting Access to Science and Social Studies Using Content Modules
Limited Capacity seats available

Developing a framework to understand the progress of students with complex learning needs in the context of learning is an essential component of a balanced and relevant curriculum and instruction system. Such a framework requires the explication and communication of clear grade-level targets for learning. The development of materials to support such a framework was undertaken by the Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE), edCount LLC, and ETS. The resulting Science and Social Studies Content Modules support educators in providing grade-level instruction to students with significant disabilities, addressing their complex learning needs, and promoting inclusion. In addition, the modules are aligned to general education standards allowing the flexibility for use as a resource in any setting determined to be the student's least restrictive environment (LRE). The content modules were developed on a subset of the Tennessee Academic Standards for all students, focusing on the standards assessed by the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program Alternate (TCAP/Alt) in Science and Social Studies. In addition to providing high level information on the content of the academic standards, the modules provide information on making connections across standards, Evidenced-Based Practices (EBP) for teaching key vocabulary, suggestions for incorporating Universal Design for Learning (UDL), strategies for developing tactile maps and graphics, and ideas for transferring and generalizing concepts, knowledge, and skills to future school, community and work environments. The Science and Social Studies modules include information unique to each content. The Science modules provide information on including eight practices for learning science and engineering as described in A Framework for K-12 Science Education (2012). The Social Studies modules provide information on grade-band concepts and vocabulary grouped by learning progression areas (e.g., physical and human geography). The presenters will discuss the primary goal of the content modules ‒ to facilitate access to the Tennessee Science and Social Studies Academic Standards through rigorous instruction of students with significant disabilities alongside of same age peers. State leadership will share perspectives and insights regarding 1) the connections across curriculum, instruction, and assessment; 2) supporting educators and building capacity; and 3) plans for professional development to ensure the teachers and instructional leaders for this population of students have the knowledge and skills needed to support students'€™ academic progress in inclusive classrooms. The objectives of this presentation align with the 2017 TASH Conference theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion,"€ by highlighting the impact of providing high-quality, standards-aligned, and accessible content modules for educators of Tennessee students with significant cognitive disabilities. Through the development and implementation of these content modules, the TDOE has discovered a means by which to ensure classrooms are places where students with disabilities learn, experience meaningful participation, and develop a sense of belonging.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Jean Clayton

Jean Clayton

associate, edCount LLC
Jean Clayton is a retired teacher with over 20 years experience in working with students with significant cognitive disabilities. She spent most of the last half of her teaching career supporting students in fully inclusive settings. She currently works at edCount LLC supporting development... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Using TED Talks to Empower Future Teachers to Become Advocates for Individuals with Emotional/Mental Health Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will demonstrate a strategy for empowering future teachers to become advocates for individuals with emotional/mental health challenges. Those of us diagnosed with emotional/mental health disabilities often face stigma and are pushed to the margins of K-12 classrooms. By using TED Talks that present first-person narratives from individuals with emotional/mental health challenges, a university instructor with personal experience with mental health disabilities was able to empower future teachers to become advocates for students who most need it. This presentation presents a step-by-step overview of the process and highlights key resources.


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

What's the Story? - Listening Deeply to Measure the Value of What You Do
Limited Capacity seats available

This session is designed to explore the concept of storytelling as an evaluation tool. We will convene a storytelling circle and facilitate conversation that supports both the teller and the listener to learn new ways to measure their effectiveness as service providers. Storytellers will be coached to tell the story of what works or what doesn't work in their services.

Speakers
avatar for Shelley Nessman

Shelley Nessman

Consultant, In the Company of Others
avatar for Sheldon Schwitek

Sheldon Schwitek

Founder, In the Company of Others
Culture of Gentleness Graphic Facilitation, MAPS & PATH Positive Behaviour Support Person Centeredness


Thursday December 14, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Easy as 1-2-3: Adapting Books for Students with Significant Support Needs including Visual Impairments
Limited Capacity seats available

Almost 35% of students registered with the American Printing House for the Blind are consistently labeled as non-readers. Non-readers are defined as those students who show no reading potential or who cannot be classified as either pre-readers or readers. Given the fact that students with visual impairments can read or demonstrate reading readiness using visual, tactual, and/or auditory means, it is difficult to accept the premise that one-third of this population is unable to show some degree of reading readiness or reading proficiency using one or more of the aforementioned modalities, especially since there are no specified grade-level expectations attached to these designations. A comparison of the APH Federal Quota Census data related to primary literacy modality across grade levels reveals that the percentage of students labeled as non-readers ranges between 20-29%. While the percentage of pre-readers decreases with age and the percentage of readers increases with age, the percentage of non-readers stays fairly consistent. When looking at reading classification by placement, 36% of students registered by state departments of education are labeled non-readers. Twenty percent of students registered by schools for the blind are classified as non-readers, and 15% of students registered by rehabilitation programs are categorized as non-readers. In comparison, 81% of those registered by programs specifically for students with multiple impairments are marked as non-readers. Unfortunately, this data seems to show that these students receive this label in infancy and that it follows them over the course of their entire academic career. This practice violates the least dangerous assumption principle, which stipulates that we should expect all students, no matter the severity of the impairment(s), to benefit from literacy activities and direct instruction and, therefore, to spend quality time involved in such activities. Students with significant disabilities can and do benefit from literacy instruction. Certainly, they can't benefit if they aren't provided access (Browder & Spooner, 2006, pp. 44-45). Thus, this presentation will share alternative strategies for providing meaningful literacy experiences to learners with significant visual and intellectual impairments, especially in relation to mainstream, age-appropriate literature. Techniques based off of Dr. Wormsley's I-M-ABLE approach for simplifying content, stimulating the development of vocabulary, promoting concept development, and facilitating comprehension will be shared. Strategies for effective use of adapted communication symbols, both tactile and visual, reinforced by auditory input will also be demonstrated. Particular emphasis will be given to cortical visual impairment when discussing visual adaptations. In addition, use of access technology, including alternative and augmentative communication devices, will be discussed. Finally, a sampling of low-tech and high-tech adapted books will be shown.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Groundtruthing Secondary Inclusion of Youth with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

There have been inspiring changes in curriculum and instruction for students with disabilities since the Education for all Handicapped Children Act of 1975. At the elementary level there has been increasing success at accessing the general curriculum and creating rich social relationships. If we were to take a reading of secondary inclusion what might it look like? What happens when we are forced to face the mystical business of building futures? Do we dismiss the principles of inclusion and fall back on the time worn life skills pedagogy in classrooms with stoves or should we move with confidence into the very heart of secondary culture? I would like to propose an open sharing of what contemporary secondary inclusion looks like and why it looks that way and what the future might offer. The discussion would explore these key navigational inquiries 1) Segregated settings which offer conservative functional curriculum create social and academic inequality. Is this countered by consistently successful transition outcomes. How successful are segregated secondary programs at creating good lives? 2) inclusive education has revealed that learning is continuous for us all. Does it still make sense to offer youth with disabilities a narrow curriculum of daily living or should we be offering the full menu of what secondary curriculum can provide? 3)In an effort to guide self determination in transition planning is it better to focus youth with disabilities into a career based curriculum or allow them to sample all of the curriculum choices that youth without disabilities experience. How do we best guide informed choice about personal futures? 4) Is it possible to embed functional skill training in general education environments or is there evidence that these skills are better taught in resource rooms? What is the better way to invite transfer and generalization after graduation? 5) A variety of social relationships are created by youth when they share space and time inside high school course work. Is there evidence that relationships between youth with and without disabilities are formed in inclusive secondary classrooms? Is there still an over reliance on educational assistants? Do the outcomes of community based instruction justify the loss of belonging in high school environments?

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Johannes

Aaron Johannes

Director of Training, Research and Development, Spectrum Society
Spectrum Society supports about 140 folks in their neighbourhoods in individualised ways in greater Vancouver. We have also been involved in small press publishing, self advocate supports, community based research and training for other groups. I am also a board member for TLC in... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Latino Community of Practice: Supporting Families with Children and Youth with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2015, The Center for Leadership in Disability, School of Public Health at Georgia State University set out to address the complex needs of the ever-growing Spanish-speaking communities in Georgia. Since, through the work of our Diversity Fellows, we have co-lead in convening diverse, multi-sector professionals, parent leaders and allies to address existing concerns. The Latino Community of Practice: Supporting Families with Children and Youth with Disabilities brings together over 125 consortium partners in metro Atlanta and beyond. And we have identified three areas of focus: 1) professional capacity building and collective impact; 2) education and leadership training for parents; and 3) formal and informal advocacy in public policy and systems of care.

Speakers
avatar for Brenda Liz Munoz

Brenda Liz Munoz

Appointed and Executive Council, GCDD, Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities
I am interested in immigrant and new comer inclusion and integration in the state of Georgia and the southeast region.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Literary Arts Club: Creating Shared Experiences on a College Campus
Limited Capacity seats available

The confluence of several factors at a small, liberal arts university created the opportunity to develop a community-based literary arts club. First, undergraduate students are required to create and implement a service-learning project. Two second-year students, one an education major focused on becoming a special educator, the other a sociology major/communication sciences and disorder minor who wants to become an audiologist approached a special education professor about the possibility of creating a club to bring together college-age students with disabilities and college students. The concept of a book club emerged and a communication sciences and disorders professor joined the planning team. Together, we developed plans to implement the club and recruited participants from campus and the local school district transition program for students ages 18 - 21. Initially, the club started as a book club with an emphasis on reading a short story followed by discussion and an activity. The emphasis morphed into a literary arts club with reading, writing, and other activities. The team selected the reading materials with input from everyone and planned all of the meetings and activities. The college students and professors took turns leading the club. We read, wrote poems, wrote short stories, kept journals, and engaged in many discussions on the day's topic. For example, one meeting involved creating a black-out poem from a short-story selection. Another meeting focused on using picture prompts to create short, 25-word stories. We met weekly for an hour during the academic semesters in the college student union. Participants could purchase coffee and snacks from the coffee shop. We gathered around a large table or on comfortable chairs. In this manner a community was established in which everyone looked forward to our time together. Everyone participated and shared. The presentation will include a summary of the steps taken to establish the club, highlights of the activities we have done for the past 2 years, individual perspectives on their participation in the club, and suggestions on how to create a similar club. This presentation connects with TASH's theme for the 2017 Conference "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion"€ on several levels. When persons with disabilities leave school after graduation or enter a transition program, they often lose contact with same-age peers. The opportunity to connect with same-age peers on a college campus creates a social outlet that allows for relationships to develop. College students often have a strong desire to engage in social justice and give tremendous energy towards the rights of others. This was certainly the case for the two students who proposed creating this club. University professors act as mentors along with providing a service to the community and engaging in their chosen profession. There is nothing more gratifying than seeing the convergence of student, teacher, and community towards a positive outcome that benefits everyone. Thus is the case with Literary Arts Club. We all benefited -- professor, student, and community member. By sharing our story and experiences we plan to let others know that it is possible and enjoyable to come together under the guise of literary arts, a road not always taken.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Navigating Through Life with Positive Relationships
Limited Capacity seats available

Sharing of two separate lives that joined together in friendship in 2012. Using the process of person-centered planning to navigate the many dimensions of adulthood. Together they helped each other with decision making through the years. The friendship carries across all areas from Circle of Support, to conferences, and moving from employment. Finding Life long Friendship College Social Experience Employment options in higher education.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Simple PPT and Picture Adaptations for Engaged Inclusion in High School English Novel Units
Limited Capacity seats available

Two high school special education teachers and their university mentor will describe how PPTs and simple picture adaptations along with powerful collaboration and co-teaching strategies were used to meaningful include students with complex disabilities in high school novel units. Be prepared to truly understand the plot of Macbeth!

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Altieri

Elizabeth Altieri

Professor, Radford University
I am passionate about inclusion. I have been an advocate and supporter of Inclusive Education and Community since the 1970s and first joined TASH in 1979. I have teaching and administrative experience with inclusive programs for school-aged students and adults with disabilities dating... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Strategies for Successful Inclusive Education
Limited Capacity seats available

A collaborative approach and not an adversarial approach goes a long way for successful inclusive education for students with needs that are atypical. It is critical for parents and self advocates to partner with and get buy in and cooperation from the school - teachers, therapists, administrators and even building staff and support people in order for a student to be successful. Relationship building with school goes a long way in the success and is contagious. Various strategies can help a parent or a self advocate to slowly build the relationship, build trust and get on to a path of success.

Speakers
avatar for Animesh Shah

Animesh Shah

Parent/Advocate


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

Teen Jobseeker + School + Community + Family + VR + Employer + Medicaid = Kyle's Dream Job
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will follow the success of a student with the most complex support needs who is accessing integrated employment experience. His family knew it was critical to focus on real employment skill development at an early age. Kyle McGee began his process toward paid employment at 16 years old and a rising Junior at Oak Mountain High School in a suburb of Birmingham, AL. Kyle uses a motorized wheelchair and an augmentative communication device. He has an intellectual disability and has behaviors that are barriers to employment. A family community relationship with a local health and wellness center led to an opportunity for Kyle to have an extended internship. With the help of a transition specialist, the family, Kyle, and the IEP team established the internship to fulfill important transition goals. The internship was implemented with the partnership of an expert in customized employment, augmentative communication, behavior supports, and school system support staff. The internship fits Kyle's interests and strengths. This presentation will demonstrate how it is possible to implement Employment First policies to allow success in employment for everyone.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica McGee

Veronica McGee

President, Alabama TASH
I am a parent of a son born with congenital hydrocephalus. Kyle is 18 and is nonverbal and uses both a manual and power chair. This is my 2nd consecutive year to attend TASH. Since my first conference last year in St. Louis, I along with my mentor and friend, Susan Ellis, organized... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

The Emotional Classroom: The Importance of Teaching Kids to Manage their Emotions
Limited Capacity filling up

Schools are faced with a growing population of students who have difficulty managing their behaviors. Many of these students are diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder or other specific disability such as ADHD or Nonverbal Learning Disorder. Historically, these students have been a challenge to educators as their behaviors often overshadow their otherwise strong cognitive skills. Behavioral interventions have frequently proven ineffective as they don't show progress across settings or appear to last. However, new compelling research showing deficits in the areas of the brain that control and regulate emotions is poised to shake up the education world and lead the way for new and more targeted interventions. A comprehensive review of the existing new research will be discussed. The research will underscore the need for new methods and will support a change in the way we support kids with Autism and other related disabilities. Using research and our own extensive work with students, we have developed a program to teach emotional regulation to students in the classroom to help them both learn and manage emotions. These students have historically spent hours each week in offices and alternative settings due to their behaviors. Tantrums, outbursts, aggression, and shutdowns are frequently seen with this population and are some of the markers of emotional dysregulation. These cognitively able students are now able to spend time in classrooms learning, instead of waiting for their turn to "process it out" in an office later, missing critical time on learning. Supporting students' with complex and significant behavioral needs is a critical educational right. This support is needed not just for education but for life.

Speakers
avatar for Lori Jackson

Lori Jackson

The Connections Model
Lori is an educational psychologist who has been working with students and their families for over 15 years. She believes that all children have the capacity to succeed in school and the right to a quality education. Lori has seen the transformation that is possible when students... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:25pm

The Power of Peer Support
Limited Capacity seats available

Peer support is the basis of the work of Centers for independent Living Centers for Independent Living are cross disability, grass roots organizations, run by and for people with disabilities - peer support benefits both the provider and receiver of the support - peer support is diverse - peer support provides opportunities and support for more involvement in self-advocacy; self-determination; disability rights, civil rights and human rights; and "equality, opportunity and inclusion" - however, peer support is a "best kept secret" and is not known to enough people as the resource and effective tool it is. This session will share experiences, ideas, resources and information about peer support.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Pogue

Linda Pogue

Disability Rights and Program Director, disABILITY LINK
Linda has had a lifetime of relationships with people with disabilities and a 40 year career of supporting people with disabilities to…live in the community; live a self-determined life; advocate within the service, legal and health systems; develop leaderships skills and opportunities... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:25pm - 5:15pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303
 
Friday, December 15
 

8:29am

About Breakout Sessions
Breakout Sessions are delivered in a scheduled room for 50 minutes.

Friday December 15, 2017 8:29am - 4:10pm
TBA

8:30am

Creating a Vi$ion for Your Life
Limited Capacity seats available

Money plays an important role in everybody's life. Everyone needs financial education and other opportunities to better understand how to manage money and save towards our individual goals. In this session, you will identify a goal that you have for yourself and explore how to earn, manage, and save money to meet your goal. You will also hear from a self-advocate on their success in building their money skills. During this session, we will complete the following activities:
1. Mini-Vision Board Activity a. Identify a goal that you have for yourself? b. What is the cost to reach your goal?
2. First Money Memory Activity
3. What are some of your needs related to money? a. What are strategies for meeting your money needs? b. How can you earn more money and save your money, even when you need to keep a public benefit?
This session is intended for self-advocates and their allies but is a fun, interactive session for anyone interested in building their money skills.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Jennings

Elizabeth Jennings

Deputy Director, National Disability Institute
Excited to share field-tested strategies for improving the financial well-being of people with disabilities.
avatar for Rebecca Salon

Rebecca Salon

LEAD Center and DC Department on Disability Services


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Discover, Show, Experience! Don't just ask and expect an answer...
Limited Capacity seats available

Many adolescents and young adults with significant disabilities are not able to answer questions reliably that have great impact on their future lives. Such questions may include "What kind of job do you want?" "What kind of place would you like to live in and call home?" "Who would you like to support you?" "Which people do you want to spend more time with?" "What do you want to do in your free time?" As a result, parents and staff often make decisions based on presumptions of incompetence, without consideration of the person's right to self-determine, or given poor advice that boils down to "one size fits all." This session will describe practical, respectful and person-centered application of evidence-based strategies to discover what each individual really needs, wants, prefers, and is interested in for their own quality of life. Use of assistive technology as well as inclusive experiences that allow discovery, seeing, and experiencing a range of opportunities will be addressed so that individuals who cannot otherwise tell you answers to questions you may ask of them can still make informed and supported decisions that pertain to their own equity, opportunity and inclusion.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Rammler

Linda Rammler

Community Services Director, UConn UCEDD
Who YOU are and what YOU'RE doing! (Mark Partin, old TASH, new work, family...)


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Dreams, Goals & Graduation: Inclusive Postsecondary Education as a Path to Careers
Limited Capacity seats available

Why go to college? The holistic answer is to grow as a person, the practical answer is to grow career prospects, and of course both are true. People with intellectual disabilities are no different, and with the explosive growth in the number of inclusive post-secondary education programs, more and more people with cognitive disabilities are choosing IPSE as their route to a career. In this presentation, three long-time members of the inclusive postsecondary community in Georgia, including a recent IPSE graduate, will share the ongoing evolution of IPSE in their state and stories of its impact on a veritable rainbow of individuals. We'll discuss how to find a successful fit between a person and an inclusive postsecondary experience and share practical advice on how to bake quality career development into the core of a program, how to support successful student transition from school to career, and the critical role of providers, state agencies and families. Attendees will be critical participants in this session, engaging in activities like the Unpredictable Path Game, a team exercise inspired by the real-life experiences of members of the inclusive postsecondary community that will illustrate some of the twists, turns, opportunities and outcomes an inclusive postsecondary education can bring.

Speakers
CM

Charlie Miller

Disability Community Specialist, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency
Disability Rights Advocate and a State Employee with Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation agency
avatar for Karla Wade

Karla Wade

Academic Transition Teacher, GVRA
Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. Employment Outcomes


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Elevating Olmstead Advocacy: Lessons from Georgia's Olmstead Experience
Limited Capacity seats available

Georgia is the Olmstead state. We brought the Olmstead case, experienced the slow progress of Olmstead planning, and then obtained the first and most extensive Justice Department Olmstead Settlement in 2010. Since then, we have made major strides in transforming our mental health system, but slow progress in transforming our systems for people with developmental disabilities and physical disabilities. Throughout this process, we have learned lessons in (1) self-advocacy; (2) coalition building of stakeholders; (3) systems transformation in agencies, housing, and state Olmstead planning, (4) peer supports; (5) litigating Olmstead; and (6) seeking comprehensive Olmstead settlements and remedies. This presentation will demonstrate the important lessons for future Olmstead advocacy from Georgia's experience -- the experience of the Olmstead state. This presentation will directly align with the conference theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," because it will provide concrete lessons for self-advocates and advocates from Georgia's experience transforming from a state that had a 19th century system of institutionalizing people with disabilities to 21st century opportunities for inclusion, independence, and meaningful opportunities to participate, work, and live in the community for people with significant disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Talley Wells

Talley Wells

attorney, ALAS
Talley works with the Institute on Human Development and Disability at the University of Georgia to educate law students and others about the Olmstead Supreme Court decision. Up until November, Talley was the Director of the Disability Integration Project at the Atlanta Legal Aid... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Evaluating Communication Apps Based on Current Research and Critical Criteria
Limited Capacity filling up

Communication is vital to interacting with the environment, making decisions about one's life, and inclusion across settings. To support communication for individuals who could benefit from alternative and augmentative communication, knowledge about the utility of common and popular technology, and evidence supporting its use is a requirement. This systematic review examines the existing body of research on augmentative and alternative communication in the form of applications for mobile devices. Findings provide evidence of limited quality research on communication apps. There is not enough research to identify these apps as research-based, but study results indicate apps are a promising technology with the potential for utility with individuals with complex communication support needs. A synthesis of guidelines for reviewing apps based on critical criteria is presented as a guide for evaluation of apps and matching apps to the needs of communicators.


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Exploring Students' Perceived Messages of Self-Reliance by Three Entities Involved in Transition
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will discuss results from a small study demonstrating how perceived messages from families, schools, and social service agencies affect the resilience, successes, and challenges of individuals with developmental disabilities to create positive school-to-adulthood transitions. Four participants with developmental disabilities were qualitatively interviewed for this study. With the absence of the school personnel member who did not contribute to the study, one school personnel member, family member, and social service agency worker associated with each participant were interviewed as well. The session will discuss themes derived from the interview data: a) the construction of disability, b) the overall positive messages (or perceived messages) that participants from school personnel experienced regarding one's disabilities and how families and social service agencies supported those messages, c) the positive and negative messages (or perceived messages) that participants from schools experienced regarding one's disabilities and how families and social service agencies supported or did not support those messages, and d) the overall negative messages (or perceived messages) that participants from schools experienced regarding one's disabilities and how families and social service agencies supported or did not support those messages. These themes demonstrated how a combination of reproduction, agency, construction of disability, and resistance shape the participants' economic and governmental dependency statuses.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Tracy Rackensperger

Dr. Tracy Rackensperger

University of Georgia
Since 2006, Tracy Rackensperger, Ph.D. has held a public service faculty position within the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, Institute on Human Development and Disability at the University of Georgia. Rackensperger has expertise in overseeing the development and implementation... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

HCBS, Community Living & Day/Employment Services: How to do it
Limited Capacity seats available

One agency and the people they support will share their stories of how to provide person-centered supported living and community day services where people are included in community settings which fully meet the HCBS Waiver Rules. Discussion topics will also include systems change strategies for agencies and programs to move from segregated services to inclusive community services by implementing person-centered practices through self-determination and PBIS in order to comply with the federal rule.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Shepard

Scott Shepard

Director, Avenues Supported Living Services
Scott Shepard is the Executive Director of Avenues Supported Living Services, a non-profit agency which provides community living and personalized day supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in North Los Angeles County. With Avenues SLS, we had the opportunity... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

State Continuum Regulations and Their Relationships to Inclusion for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This session examines state continuum of alternative placement regulations and policy frameworks that facilitate the inclusion of students with significant disabilities in general education classrooms and policy differences between highly inclusive states with positive outcomes for students with significant disabilities and highly segregated states with poor outcomes for students with significant disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions
JM

Julia M. White

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Tackling the Problem of Problem Solving
Limited Capacity seats available

Students with disabilities have historically been victims of low expectations in mathematics, resulting in inequitable opportunities in and access to the general curriculum. Despite mathematical problem solving being the "cornerstone of mathematical learning"€ according to mathematics experts (e.g., National Council of Teachers of Mathematics), it has received limited attention from researchers (Spooner, Root, Saunders, & Browder, 2017; King, Lemons, and Davidson, 2016). This presentation will feature four studies that used evidence-based practices to teach students with autism and intellectual disability to solve mathematical word problems. Implications for practice and future research will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Cox

Sarah Cox

Graduate Student, Florida State University
avatar for Jenny Root

Jenny Root

Assistant Professor of Special Education, Florida State University
Jenny would like to talk to you about general curriculum access, teaching math to students with autism/intellectual disability, and how teachers make instructional decisions for students with extensive support needs. Jenny was the 2015 TASH Alice Hayden award winner.
avatar for Alicia Saunders

Alicia Saunders

UNC Charlotte


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

Using Participation Plans to Teach Social Studies Content in Inclusive Secondary Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this project was to teach social studies content to high school students with intellectual and developmental disabilities in general education (inclusive) settings. Limited research focused on teaching social studies content to students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as limited interventions in inclusive settings for this population have been completed; as such, this project is needed to inform practitioners and researchers alike. A single-case, multiple baseline across prioritized skill categories (knowledge of facts, vocabulary, and comprehension) and participants was employed. Data analysis included visual inspection of trend, level, and variability changes across phases as well as measures of Percent of All Non-Overlapping Data. Findings from this project will significantly inform inclusive instructional methods for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Amanda L. Miller

Amanda L. Miller

Assistant Professor, SUNY Cortland
Amanda Miller is an Assistant Professor in the Foundations and Social Advocacy Department at the State University of New York College at Cortland (SUNY Cortland). Her research focuses on the lived experiences of girls of color with intellectual and developmental disabilities, teacher... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Gross Toews

Samantha Gross Toews

Doctoral Student, University of Kansas


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

We want to read too! Modifying shared reading for children with complex communication needs
Limited Capacity seats available

The ability to read is essential to both academic success and overall quality of life. Reading is a pivotal skill, that is, the ability to read leads to further learning opportunities and empowers individuals to better access their community. Unfortunately, students who have complex communication needs (CCN) are often restricted in their opportunities to develop literacy skills resulting in dismal reading outcomes for this population. An estimated 50% - 90% of individuals with complex communication needs are either illiterate or reading well below grade level expectations (Koppenhaver & Yoder, 1992). In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and promise of a modified shared reading intervention package for students with CCN. The results of the study demonstrate that children with CCN are able to "participate (and benefit from)”shared reading activities given appropriate modifications and accommodations.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Fleury

Veronica Fleury

Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota
Veronica Fleury, Ph.D., BCBA-D Dr. Fleury is an assistant professor of special education at the University of Minnesota, where she also serves as the coordinator for the autism teacher licensure and master’s degree program. Her research focuses on optimizing instruction for learners... Read More →
avatar for Talya Kemper

Talya Kemper

Assistant Professor, California State University East Bay
Assistant Professor at Cal State University East Bay. I work in the Teacher Education Department preparing future general education teachers in working with students with disabilities that are included into general education classrooms. I was a full inclusion teacher for students... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

What to Wear? A Closer Look at Some Wearable Technologies
Limited Capacity seats available

Technology is evolving at a fast past. Now a days there are more wearable technologies available than ever before! But what do these technologies do and how can they assist someone with a disability? What to wear? During this session, participants will learn and see some of the new technologies. Participants will have a chance delve into the world of smart watches and apps that can assist with task management and GPS. Participants will also learn about items that can be worn to assist with reading as well as getting around town. They will also learn what holographic computing is and the future of using it. Participants will also learn how to get more out of the fitness bands then just steps they take per day.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

8:30am

What works? Stories of Successful Leadership in the Lives, Groups and Communities of People with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

The interest of this research is in the lens of leadership through knowledge gathered from and with the self advocate community through a series of "community conversations," focus groups and literature reviews. It is often an assumption that leadership is a somewhat singular, rare quality in limited supply, based on individualistic qualities which perhaps more than anything else, exist at the far end of an imaginary meritocratic scale, where people are smartest, quickest and most powerful. This research demonstrates that people with intellectual disabilities perform leadership and demonstrate capacity to lead, sometimes in traditional, individualistic ways but more frequently in relational, interdependent ways that focus on what emerges from and within the groups they are part of. Their leadership may look different than we expect, but once we acknowledge and understand their capacity and methods we might better incorporate them into projects and initiatives that support social change, to the benefit of their peers and the communities they are part of. Self advocates who assisted in the design of the research created an iterative framework with constant touch-points to return the growing body of information to their community. This research exemplifies the theme of "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" by including people with disabilities in research design, facilitation and dissemination on a topic of interest to them through a social constructionist framework.

Speakers
avatar for Liz Etmanski

Liz Etmanski

Elizabeth Etmanski is an Artist based in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada. Having won an award for her artistic passions in Secondary School, she went on to become the first person with Down Syndrome to graduate from the Emily Carr University of Art and Design. She... Read More →
avatar for Aaron Johannes

Aaron Johannes

Director of Training, Research and Development, Spectrum Society
Spectrum Society supports about 140 folks in their neighbourhoods in individualised ways in greater Vancouver. We have also been involved in small press publishing, self advocate supports, community based research and training for other groups. I am also a board member for TLC in... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Nessman

Shelley Nessman

Consultant, In the Company of Others


Friday December 15, 2017 8:30am - 9:20am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

AAC Modeling in Inclusive Classrooms: Practice makes perfect!
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Accumulated evidence in AAC research now strongly supports the importance of AAC modeling to increase students' language use and competence using either high- or low-teach AAC tools (Sennott, Light, & McNaughton 2016). Inclusive educational settings are the ideal context in which to implement modeling within both academic and social contexts. In this session, examples of systems used for implementing strong AAC modeling among paraprofessionals, teachers, and peers will be shared, along with ideas for getting started in your own classrooms. Emphasis will also be placed on increasing opportunities for AAC use throughout the school day.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Hanreddy

Amy Hanreddy

Associate Professor, Cal State Northridge


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Advocating in Your Faith Community: Tips for Self-Advocates and Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Ever wonder how to get more involved in your faith community or how to get involved for the first time in a faith community? "Tried and true" tips for self-advocates (and family members) will be discussed both about fuller expression of spirituality and networking with those share the same values and beliefs who can support other aspects of leading a good life inclusively in the community. Interaction with participants occurs throughout the session!

Speakers
avatar for Linda Rammler

Linda Rammler

Community Services Director, UConn UCEDD
Who YOU are and what YOU'RE doing! (Mark Partin, old TASH, new work, family...)


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Expanding Boundaries and Erasing Boarders: Including Rural Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

How are rural communities working to provide inclusive social and educational experiences for students with significant disabilities? Amidst the problems rural schools may face, they have characteristics that could have the potential to promote inclusive schools and more equitable opportunities for students with significant disabilities. It may be perceived of rural communities that there is not a wide-range of diversity, but scholars have reflected on this myth claiming that may not be entirely true of rural schools and in fact, they may have similar amounts of diverse differences as urban communities. By reflecting and examining the high disability and poverty rates in rural areas, schools will be better able to create an inclusive school environment for all students. A presentation of current literature will aim to examine the barriers which may exist for rural schools to provide inclusive education services for their students with significant disabilities. This study attempts to develop conclusions of the barriers rural schools may be facing when it comes to creating inclusive special education services for students with significant disabilities in rural areas.

Speakers
avatar for Katie McCabe

Katie McCabe

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Helping Families Hold High Expectations for Employment and Postsecondary Education
Limited Capacity filling up

Studies show a strong relationship between parent expectations and transition outcomes for youth with disabilities. However, conveying and maintaining high expectations can be a challenge for parents, educators, and youth themselves. This session will discuss how low expectations can creep into the transition process, how those expectations can be raised, and will use a National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT) manuscript to help brainstorm strategies for supporting families to envision great futures. Key Words: This highly interactive session will include large group discussions based on key questions related to helping families see bright futures for their youth. Those discussions will be supported by content and presenter experiences that highlight successes stories for youth with significant disabilities in employment and postsecondary education. The whole session rests on a dual-capacity foundation: 1) helping families and professionals acquire high expectations, and 2) helping families and professionals convey high expectations so others may act accordingly. This session aligns well with the conference theme Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion. Though great strides have been made in recent decades to address the achievement gap for youth with significant disabilities, much work is still needed. Youth with significant disabilities still lack opportunities in employment and postsecondary education. This session addresses one of the core issues: low expectations, but does so with a spirit of hope.

Speakers
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Project Manager, YES! Center / TASH
Alison DeYoung is the Project Manager for the Youth Employment Solutions (YES!) Center, the national training and technical assistance center for the Partnerships in Employment (PIE) states. She began working in the field of education in 2008 while completing her undergraduate and... Read More →
avatar for Sean Roy

Sean Roy

Training Associate, TransCen, Inc.
State Liaison for the YES! Center and lead staff on the RRTC on VR Practices and Youth. I am an experienced trainer with a focus on transition age youth and family engagement.



Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Implementing Emergent Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

The presenters will describe a randomized controlled trial funded by the Institute of Education Sciences to investigate the effectiveness of a promising emergent reading program developed for students with intellectual disabilities and autism when it is implemented in small group contexts in general education classrooms--with classmates participating on a rotating basis in the reading lessons. Although the reading program has a strong evidence base, all of the previous efficacy research was conducted in special education classroom settings. We hypothesized that the program not only could be implemented successfully and effectively in general education classrooms, but also that the peers would benefit from their participation in the reading lessons; that is, we anticipated that the opportunity provided to peers to observe their classmates with disabilities as competent, emerging readers and to engage with them in supported, positive interactions would produce positive changes in their perceptions of the students' characteristics and abilities. We will share with participants not only the results related to the changes in the emergent reading skills of students participating in the study, but also the changes in peer attitudes associated with their experiences as "reading buddies."

Speakers
LB

Lakshmi Balasubramanian

Ph.D Student, University of California, Berkeley
Lakshmi Balasubramanian is a fourth year Ph.D. student in the Joint Doctoral program at UC Berkeley with San Francisco State University (SFSU). She is also an inclusion specialist at Fremont Unified School District and piloted the Learning Center Model for Inclusion at the elementary... Read More →
avatar for Pam Hunt

Pam Hunt

Professor, San Francisco State University
avatar for Vidya Munandar

Vidya Munandar

University of Kansas


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Individual and Family Correlates of Living Options Among Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

With recent policy and caselaw decisions, there are more opportunities for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) to live independently. To develop targeted interventions to increase independent living, it is necessary to identify malleable correlates of living options. To this end, 546 parents and siblings of adults with IDD responded to a national survey. Per parent and sibling report, individuals with IDD were more likely to live outside of the family home when the family engaged in future planning, had more informal supports, had parents with less caregiving abilities, and the individual with IDD had more functional abilities. Among the 187 individuals with IDD who lived outside of the family home, individuals with IDD with more problem behaviors and less functional abilities were more likely to live in group homes with more than four individuals (versus independently with or without supports). When parents had poor caregiving abilities, individuals with IDD were more likely to live in group homes with more than four individuals (versus independently). When the family engaged in more future planning or the individual had less functional abilities, individuals with IDD were more likely to live in a group home with less than four individuals (versus independently). Implications for policymakers, practitioners, and future research are discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Meghan Burke

Meghan Burke

Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Managed Long-Term Services and Supports: Could it actually make things better for people with disabilities?
Limited Capacity filling up

This presentation will address the question of whether managed long-term services and supports can create better access to supports and better inclusion and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities than traditional long-term services and supports programs. Speakers from Tennessee will reflect on the state's experience with managed long-term services and supports for people with physical, developmental and intellectual disabilities. Presenters will discuss what they have learned about how to use managed care as a tool to advance equity, opportunity and inclusion and to create more accountability for the use of public funds to advance the civil and human rights of people with disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Patti Killingsworth

Patti Killingsworth

Assistant Commissioner, TennCare, Long-Term Services and Supports
Patti Killingsworth is an Assistant Commissioner for the Bureau of TennCare, and since February 2007, the Chief of Long Term Services & Supports. She has worked in Medicaid programs in Missouri and Tennessee for nearly two decades, leading system redesign initiatives in both states... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Mills

Lisa Mills

Deputy Chief, TennCare, Long-Term Services and Supports
Lisa A. Mills, PhD is currently Deputy Chief of Long-Term Services and Supports for TennCare, the Tennessee Medicaid Agency. Prior to joining TennCare, Dr. Mills had a twenty-eight year career as an advocate and consultant in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Promoting Teacher Agency for Inclusive Education
Limited Capacity seats available

This session focuses on transforming teacher education to reflect beliefs, efficacy, and agency necessary for teachers to realize inclusive student outcomes. We will describe our conceptual model of inclusive teacher agency, and describe preliminary results associated with the learning experiences for teaching and advocacy to transform predominantly segregated services. We seek to identify the critical influences of teachers' growth toward inclusion.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Allcock

Heather Allcock

Assistant Professor, Providence College
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Mary Morningstar

Mary Morningstar

Professor, Portland State University
Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at Portland State University and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison`
Andrea Ruppar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her primary research interest is in decision making about curriculum and access to inclusive contexts for students with extensive support... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Protecting Human Rights: Empowering Self-Advocates to Serve on Human Rights Committees
Limited Capacity seats available

A leader in DC's self-advocacy coalition, Project ACTION!, is working with the Self Advocacy Resource and Technical Assistance Center (SARTAC) on a project to develop training materials and approaches for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) so that they can serve effectively on Human Rights Committees and other Boards and Workgroups. There are lots of Human Rights Committees and Boards without any members who are people with I/DD, even though those committees and boards make decisions that affect the lives of people with I/DD. It's very important that people with disabilities have a voice on boards and workgroups that make decisions that affect them to protect the rights of people with disabilities. This interactive session will describe the materials being developed, explore the many roles that self-advocates can play, and heard from participants about their experiences with self-advocates serving on Human Rights Committees and other board and workgroups. This project is a collaboration between Project ACTION!, D.C.'s Developmental Disabilities Administration, D.C.'s Human Rights Advisory Committee and provider-level human rights committees. Self-advocates will review the materials and training approaches and provide feedback on what works for them and what should be changed before the materials are final.

Speakers
avatar for Phyllis Holton

Phyllis Holton

Deputy Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Deputy Director, Quality Assurance & Performance Management Administration, DC Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Student Participation in Extracurricular Activities: Does It Make Any Difference?
Limited Capacity seats available

The presentation will discuss the findings of a research study that examined the participation of middle and high school students with severe disabilities in school sponsored extracurricular activities. Specifically, the study sought to understand the extent to which teachers are purposefully planning for and delivering instruction during extracurricular activities, and methods used by teachers to monitor how students' learning goals are addressed (e.g., extracurricular goals are included in IEPs). The findings have direct implications for promoting inclusive practice.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at... Read More →
avatar for Stacy Dymond

Stacy Dymond

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Stacy Dymond is professor of special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on curriculum issues related to educating secondary and transition-age students with severe intellectual disabilities in inclusive school and community settings... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Ten Positive Behavior Strategies Parents (and Teachers!) Can Use on Monday
Limited Capacity filling up

This session will identify ten practical research-based strategies that are critical in the development of positive behavior support plans and are equally effective when implemented at school or at home. Specific examples will be provided for home and school across age levels from preschool through middle/high school. Participants will have the opportunity to identify strategies they can use through an interactive activity throughout the presentation. This presentation is adapted from the topical parent session that has been presented at the Parents Encouraging Parents Special Education Weekend retreat that the Colorado Department of Education has held tri-annually for the past ten years. It has been the highest rated session and parents have expressed that they finally know what to do to support their child and work with the school.

Speakers
KM

Kiki McGough

PBS Consultant, APBS
I am a retired Special Educator with a focus on behavior who has worked in the field of Positive Behavior Support since 2002. I am particularly interested in PBS in the home and partnerships between school and home to support children and families. I also do dog rescue, particularly... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Typing: From Research to Practice to Independence
Limited Capacity seats available

Our well-attended 2016 National TASH presentation on "Typing" led to a discussion involving typists, experts, practitioners, family members, and researchers; this interaction inspired the creation of a longer form presentation and conversation. When learning to tie one's shoes, the ultimate goal is independently well-tied shoes, not the method used (e.g., "bunny ears" vs. "around the tree"). Similarly, when learning to type the ultimate goal is independently well-typed communication, not the method used (e.g., "home row" vs. "hunt and peck"). This session will focus on current research, best practices, and teaching and supporting independent typing for people who do not have reliable speaking skills.

Speakers
avatar for Molly K. Rearick

Molly K. Rearick

Founder & Executive Director, IGNITE Collective, Inc.
communication, AAC, transition, adult supports, inclusive education
CS

Caitlin Solone

Doctoral Student, University of California, Los Angeles; Cal State LA


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

Won't You Help Us: Organizational Features of Meaningful Support for Families
Limited Capacity seats available

The traditionally underserved for the most part are comprised of people of color from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and often concentrated in impoverished communities. This study was designed to provide insight into the experiences of traditionally underserved families within the developmental disabilities services system from the perspective of families.


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

9:35am

You Can't Do That! Lessons Learned from an Inclusive University Course
Limited Capacity seats available

Postsecondary education programs for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (PSEs) in colleges and universities expand opportunities (Grigal, Hart, & Weir, 2012) and result in positive outcomes, including increased employment and improved social networks of support (Thoma et al., 2011). Although participating in postsecondary education results in numerous benefits for students with disabilities (Moore & Schelling, 2015), higher education faculty and staff are often unsure how to conceptualize and develop programs and courses at their home institutions (Mock & Love, 2012) that are inclusive and benefit all students. This presentation will outline the steps taken to develop an inclusive college course focused on Transition, Issues & Planning, that enrolls students who are obtaining a Chancellor's certificate via the University PSE program and single/dual teacher certification at a Midwestern 4 year University. Challenges and successes will be shared, as well as student and faculty perspectives of the experience.

Speakers
avatar for April Regester

April Regester

Associate Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis


Friday December 15, 2017 9:35am - 10:25am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Advocates. Leaders. Friends.
Limited Capacity filling up

In this panel discussion on family engagement in the lives of children and youth with disabilities, parents will share stories of individual advocacy, community building and their growth in leadership skills. They will discuss how they created a circle of support through their friendships, how those friendships began and have sustained through thick and thin - insults and compliments - mistakes and success - forgiveness and acceptance!

Speakers
avatar for Claire Dees

Claire Dees

Executive Director, Spectrum
Claire Dees is currently the Executive Director of Spectrum Autism Support Group.  Her experience includes 30 years in the field of disabilities, both as a parent and a professional.  Spectrum is a non-profit organization, which she co-founded, providing support, educational and... Read More →
KE

Kathy Everett

Director, Programs and Interventions, Copper River School District
I am the parent of a 30 yo daughter that has Down syndrome. Jennifer was always included in school and is now working part-time (over 8 years). She is now using the waiver and living semi-independently in her own apartment. Her independence has allowed me to begin some adventures... Read More →
avatar for Anne Ladd

Anne Ladd

Family Engagement Specialist, Georgia Department of Education
Anne Ladd is the Family Engagement Specialist for the Ga Department of Education, Division for Special Education Services and Supports. Previously, Ms. Ladd served as a Parent Mentor for Gwinnett County Public schools for 8 years. Ms. Ladd is a Graduate of the University of Georgia... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Bilingualism and Autism: Online Information Exchanges for Korean-American Parents of Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This study is a preliminary study on bilingualism in Korean-American children with autism and other developmental disabilities by conducting a content analysis on 26 threads and 141 replies posted by Korean-American parents in an online support community. Contrary to the literature on bilingualism in autism, Korean-American parents were found to share inaccurate information with the community. To enhance communication with parents with limited English skills, professionals and practitioners may need to invest additional resources such as user-friendly online information sources and to promote online interactions with parents of children with autism and other developmental disabilities.


Speakers
avatar for Jemma Kim

Jemma Kim

Assistant Professor, California State University, San Bernardino
Dr. Jemma Kim is an assistant professor at California State University, San Bernardino where she coordinates the master program in special education. She has had intensive experience working with students with high-intensive needs at k-12 /transition in various educational settings... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Changing Perspectives & Raising Expectations: Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

There are increasing opportunities available for individuals with intellectual disability to access higher education that prepares them for independent living, social awareness and meaningful work. This session will address the overall landscape of inclusive higher education (IHE), tuition assistance available for students that attend these programs, and the societal impact of these programs. Participants will be equipped with resources to identify and contact different inclusive programs throughout the country. School systems are required to report on Indicator 14 which provides information on the number of students with IEP€™s that attend post-secondary education or are employed. This presentation directly addresses this data. In addition to the national perspective, this session will delve deeper into information regarding each of the five programs in Tennessee (EDGE at Union, FUTURE at UT Knoxville, Lipscomb IDEAL, University of Memphis TigerLIFE, and Vanderbilt Next Steps). By the end of this session, participants will be more prepared to discuss inclusive higher education and the positive impact that these programs have on individuals with and without disabilities. In addition, participants will have materials and an understanding on ways the TN Inclusive Higher Education Alliance can be a resource for their students/families/educators.

Speakers
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University
Erik is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Special Education at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He completed his doctoral work in the area of severe disabilities at Vanderbilt University and his undergraduate work in Christian Education at Wheaton College. His research... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Doing It Right: Sexuality Education and Self-Determination
Limited Capacity seats available

Self-determination skills can help people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) make decisions about personal safety, avoid high-risk or dangerous social or sexual situations, and increase personal independence. A difficult balance exists between sexual self-advocacy and guarding against sexual abuse. This lecture session outlines research on sexual self-advocacy for individuals with IDD.

Speakers
avatar for Victoria Slocum

Victoria Slocum

Instructor, University of Kentucky
My research interests are faith inclusion and sexuality & relationship education.


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Equity and Opportunity: Leveling the Playing Field through Assessment, Instruction and Resources
Limited Capacity seats available

All students, including students with significant disabilities, can be afforded equity through learning and applying the same rigorous standards-aligned instruction and content! Connecting students eligible for alternate assessment to standards-aligned content has been the focus of our work for 6 years. This learning is critical to students for future success in employment, education and community, including relationships. It is important to provide all teachers with the tools and professional development support that will result in learning for students across environments. This session will provide participants with examples of standards-aligned content targets, materials, and sample probes which could be appropriate for students across the range of the population of those eligible for alternate assessment. In addition, a rubric will be shared which helps to define the characteristics of solid standards-aligned content that is appropriate for students at different grade levels and those who interact with material at varying levels of complexity. Finally, feedback from teachers who have tried out the examples will be shared to demonstrate ways in which the examples have been used in the classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Sharon L. Leonard

Sharon L. Leonard

Educational Consultant, PaTTAN
Sharon L Leonard is an Educational Consultant at the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network in Harrisburg, working with Pennsylvania’s Alternate Assessment and Pennsylvania’s Inclusive Practices initiative in addition to leading development of resources and modules... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Exceptional Lives: How We Can Flourish Under Positive Contingencies of Reinforcement
Limited Capacity seats available

When we arm people with knowledge of behavior principles, we help give them tools for learning any skills they value (Baldwin & Baldwin, 2000). Positive behavior supports are well-suited for creating equitable, accessible and inclusive environments while moving us away from punitive, segregated settings that can diminish quality of life.


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Lessons from the Field: Engaging Families in Research to Improve Outcomes and Services
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation is designed to report on our findings about family engagement in research from the implementation phase of our Family and Direct Support Study conducted at the Research and Training Center on Community Living (RTC-CL) at the University of Minnesota. Our anticipated results, based upon data gathered from prospective families who declined to participate in the study indicate that the engagement of families is often dependent on the availability of direct support staff, time for participation, and the age of their family member with a disability. As a result of these findings, the research team facilitated focus groups to further understand family's experiences and preferences with regard to participating in research. Based upon these two sources of data, the challenges faced when conducting research with families will be addressed, along with strategies for improving engagement of families in future research.

Moderators
avatar for Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Research Associate, University of Minnesota

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Maximizing the Benefit of Storybook Reading to Increase Communication for Individuals with Complex Communication Needs with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity filling up

Over a decade of research has documented that a child's home environment influences emergent literacy skills in early childhood (Teals, 1987; Bennett et al., 2002). These skills that children develop early in life form the foundation for future success in reading. Accordingly, teachers, parents and other caregivers are instrumental in supporting their children's literacy development by providing them with opportunities to participate in activities that promote literacy and oral language in life. We will focus on one such context that has repeatedly been shown to relate to literacy outcomes: shared reading. Many children with disabilities will have difficulty participating and learning from shared reading activities without appropriate supports. In this session, presenters will provide practical, evidence-based strategies that caregivers, teachers, and other adults can immediately implement to increase the quantity and quality of shared reading experiences. In terms of specific content, we will demonstrate evidence based practices that are shown to improve literacy and communication outcomes for individuals with complex communication needs and have severe disabilities. The presenters will first discuss foundational strategies for creating a reading environment and establishing an appropriate routine around book reading ( Fleury, 2014). In addition, the presenters will demonstrate evidence-based methods for increasing compliance and active participation during book readings, which include selecting texts that appeal to children's interests; establishing (and teaching) expectations for book reading, question and prompting strategies that can be embedded during reading to increase children's engagement, and providing targeted feedback (Fleury, 2014; Fleury & Schwartz, 2016). Participants will learn how to take these strategies and implement them in the general education classroom in order to increase the success of communication and reading for individuals with disabilities. In addition, strategies will be given that focus on how to modify books and book reading activities for individuals that are English Learners. Finally, the presenters will explain and demonstrate a modified book reading strategy for children who have complex communication needs, which includes simple curricular adaptations such as highlighting key vocabulary with visual symbols and providing children with response boards to communicate (Fleury & Kemper, 2016). The examples that will be utilized can be used across the grade span, from early intervention to transition and adulthood. A variety of instructional strategies will be used to engage workshop attendees with the content and facilitate learning, to include: lecture, video examples, live demonstrations/modeling, and discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Fleury

Veronica Fleury

Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota
Veronica Fleury, Ph.D., BCBA-D Dr. Fleury is an assistant professor of special education at the University of Minnesota, where she also serves as the coordinator for the autism teacher licensure and master’s degree program. Her research focuses on optimizing instruction for learners... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Peer Supports for Vocational and Social Success of Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Many youth with severe disabilities do not possess the vocational and social skills necessary to secure and sustain employment. One intervention that may improve these skills and provide inclusive opportunities in the work place is peer supports. This study used a multiple baseline design across participants with generalization probes to examine the effects of peer supports on the engagement in independent work tasks and social interactions for students with severe disabilities and their peers in a high school work-based setting.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Athamanah

Lindsay Athamanah

Assistant Professor, University of Missouri - St. Louis



Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Preparing Teachers to Provide Access to the General Curriculum: Navigating Barriers
Limited Capacity filling up

This study explores the barriers that teacher educators face in preparing teachers to provide students with severe disabilities access to the general curriculum. Critically, we explore how teacher educators are working to address these barriers. In doing so, we will share ways to navigate these barriers in the hopes of supporting teacher preparation programs in making changes, teacher preparation experiences, and ultimately how students with severe disabilities access the general curriculum.

Speakers
CR

Carly Roberts

Assistant Professor, University of Washington


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Self Advocacy and Resource Center (SARTAC): Advocacy Resource and Technical Assistance Center
Limited Capacity seats available

Presentation on SARTAC Project. This will be include an overview Of resources available through the center, how to access technical assistance through the Center, spotlight on self-advocacy movement, and opportunities for partnerships with other civil rights groups.

Speakers
avatar for Juliana Huerena

Juliana Huerena

Operational Manager, SABE/SWI
avatar for Tia Nelis

Tia Nelis

Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Students in the Margins: A Multi-State Analysis of Due Process Hearings Involving Students with Emotional-Behavioral Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will present findings and implications from a multi-state study of special education due process hearings that involved students with emotional-behavioral disabilities. The information presented will include an in-depth discussion of the issues frequently addressed in these due process hearings, including evaluation procedures, IEP development, behavior intervention plans, and suspension/expulsion.


Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

10:45am

Turning the Hearts of Parents to Children: How Pre-service Teachers Learn Advocacy
Limited Capacity seats available

I am excited to share how pre-service teachers, as a result of the interactions in my course on family collaboration, have risen to the occasion in their attitudes, skills, and dispositions towards partnering with families of students with disabilities. Although it may be difficult to fully convey to the participants in this brief presentation that which occurs across the course of a full semester of advocacy training, my presentation can at least be considered a rehearsal for learning, applying, and teaching sound interpersonal interaction and reflective skills. The presentation addresses how participants rise towards the level of full advancement described by Fialka, Feldman, and Mikus (2012), as "creative partnering and collaborating" (p.26) in which "The security that comes from knowing that one's hopes, dreams, goals, and concerns are truly important to and valued by one's partner enables a kind of exploration and problem solving that results in brand-new solutions and fresh ideas for intervention." (p.27) Advocacy is rising to the occasion for advancing supports and services for people with disabilities and their families. In concert with the upwardly mobile element of the conference theme I interject a musical analogy present in, Fialka, Feldman and Mikus (2012) text "Parents and Professionals partnering for children with disabilities: A dance that matters". In my experience this text has served as a source of harmony in the choreography of advocacy. For the advocacy partnership between professionals, teachers, and most importantly, the children, to be complete, preservice teachers need an advocacy-rich environment in which to learn the dance of partnership. I give this presentation in the spirit of raising my voice with those of others who are training personnel to become better advocates for TASH's cause. Partnership is the heart of advocacy. My presentation, the title of which paraphrases Malachi's memorable words, promotes the need for preservice teachers to be a collaborative catalyst, early in their career, for lifting up parents with their children, in providing services that include and support them. In addition to teaching the knowledge and skills that are required for successful advocacy, I hope that my presentation will reinforce the powerful role special education teachers and participants of the TASH conference should continue to embrace: Turning the hearts of parents to their children and of children to their parents.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 10:45am - 11:35am
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Next Generation Scientists: Teaching Science to Everyone
Limited Capacity seats available

Research has shown that very few students with disabilities have opportunity to learn science. Combined with the daunting construction of the Next Generation Science Standards, these barriers may mean that students with extensive support needs are not learning key scientific concepts and processes. Yet, scientific knowledge and processes align well with self-determination and critical thinking skills that are vital. This session will help teachers understand how to break down the NGSS and teach science to all students.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Taub

Deborah Taub

Director, OTL Education Solutions


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 1:50pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Don't Stop Learning! Literacy Programs for Adults with Complex Support Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

This exploratory qualitative study examined opportunities for literacy instruction for adults with significant disabilities through interviews with 11 professionals providing formal literacy instruction in a variety of formats and programs. We examined the way in which programs were designed for these adult learners, how adults accessed these programs, how the people providing instruction conceptualized or defined literacy for this group, and how their definitions were reflected in the literacy instructional opportunities they provided. This year's conference theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," highlights the importance of every individual having the same opportunities for continued growth and life satisfaction. This includes participating in lifelong learning opportunities. Continuing ones education as an adult is a highly valued option that many adults in the US pursue so it is important that adults with significant disabilities have these opportunities as well. We know that adult basic literacy programs rarely include adults with significant disabilities and little is known about such adult education opportunities, outside of postsecondary programs. This study provides information that will help the field begin to understand what options are available for one type of adult education - literacy instruction - and how these are accessed.

Speakers
SC

Susan Copeland

Professor, University of New Mexico


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Encouraging People with Disabilities to Implement Supported-Decision Making in Health Care
Limited Capacity seats available

People with disabilities living in the community who receive home and community based services are often not involved in making their own health care decisions. Moreover, people with disabilities who are transitioning from state hospitals or nursing facilities into the community are not supported on how they can make their own health care decisions while in the community as part of the discharge planning process. This presentation will focus on how persons with disabilities can create a circle of support to ensure equity, opportunity, and inclusion so that they can make their own informed decisions about their health care needs (including, but not limited to, selecting a health care provider, making appointments to be treated by the medical provider, and attending the medical appointment).

Speakers
avatar for Ilias Savakis

Ilias Savakis

Advocate/Program Coordinator, Georgia Advocacy Office (GAO)


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Let's Talk Money! Why Discussing Finances Are Important to Employment Services
Limited Capacity seats available

Over the past few years, new policies under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the HCBS Final Rule, and the ABLE Act have highlighted the importance of improving the financial capability of all Americans, including people with disabilities. As a part of employment services, talking about money can play a critical role in identifying barriers to employment, setting financial and employment goals, making decisions about public benefits, and effectively managing earnings. National Disability Institute's (NDIs) LEAD Center will share insights from nine pilot sites that are providing financial capability services as part of employment services. Attendees will learn about and receive tools to assess the financial health of their customers, support customers to improve money skills, make the connection between financial and employment goals, identify just-in-time moments to teach an individual about their money, and explore opportunities to integrate financial empowerment into employment and other disability services.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Boutot

Nancy Boutot

National Disability Institute
Customized Employment, Discovery, Social Security Work Incentives, living with depression
avatar for Elizabeth Jennings

Elizabeth Jennings

Deputy Director, National Disability Institute
Excited to share field-tested strategies for improving the financial well-being of people with disabilities.


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Making High School Proms Inclusive
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will give tips on how to break down barriers against discrimination based on disability, race, and other factors and promote inclusion when it comes to high school proms and how to design and promote an inclusive high school prom. During this session you will learn about policies to promote inclusion and to provide the supports needed so anyone regardless of disability, race, or other factors can participate in their regular high school prom, and some tips for schools and prom organizers to plan an inclusive prom.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Hinkle

Stephen Hinkle

Self Advocate, Self Employed
Stephen is a self advocate, person with autism and a current online facilitator for Lesley University. Stephen is a graduate of Northern Arizona University with a masters degree in special education disability policy. Stephen obtained his undergraduate degree from San Diego State... Read More →



Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Positive Youth Development: Building Capacity for Disability Inclusion in 4-H in Oregon
Limited Capacity seats available

Participation in organized out-of-school activities contributes to positive youth development like leadership skills, peer relationships and future employment, but youth with disabilities participate much less. 4-H is the largest non-formal youth program, reaching 6 million youth in the United States. 4-H is a multi-tiered organization, with national leadership, centralized university faculty, county staff, and local volunteers. Strategic planning at the national level established goals and objectives to increase access, equity, and inclusion for diverse youth in 4-H, but uptake has been slow. Oregon is one of the national leaders in determining how to include youth with disabilities. Personnel at all levels were interviewed to determine the organizational culture and strategies for building capacity. In the proposed presentation, we present initial findings on status, barriers and facilitators of disability inclusion in 4-H programs in Oregon with relevance for national 4-H and other organizations.


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Seeking Employment in the Digital Age: Student Directed Websites
Limited Capacity seats available

As educators and professionals, we have a responsibility to create innovative solutions for students to communicate their accomplishments in a professional and contemporary approach to provide access to competitive and integrated employment. In this breakout session, we will explore how to create a dynamic website allowing students to document their journey through high school, employment and beyond. We will discuss the components, organization, and process of building an website portfolio to include: online resume, blog, video, file storage, social media, photos, etc. Students can utilize this tool as a way to communicate their accomplishments, strengths, support needs, and experiences. A self advocate will co-facilitate this presentation and share his personal experience with using his website to reinstate his rights.

Ahmad's Website: http://arahman38.wixsite.com/ahmadrahman

Prezi: http://prezi.com/qecnuswqltqg/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy

Speakers
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Project Manager, YES! Center / TASH
Alison DeYoung is the Project Manager for the Youth Employment Solutions (YES!) Center, the national training and technical assistance center for the Partnerships in Employment (PIE) states. She began working in the field of education in 2008 while completing her undergraduate and... Read More →
avatar for Ahmad Rahman

Ahmad Rahman

Ahmad Rahman was born in Lahore, Pakistan and moved to the United States when he was 12 years old to gain access to a stronger education system. In 2016, he graduated from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) in Integrative Community Studies, a four-year certificate... Read More →



Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Self-Injurious Behaviors and Young Children With Disabilities: A Systematic Review
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this session is to summarize those effective intervention strategies that have been used to address self-injurious behaviors performed by young children with disabilities in single case research design studies published between the years of 2000 through Spring 2017. Findings will be presented from both research and practice perspectives in order to support the integration and inclusion of young children with multiple/severe disabilities.

Speakers
CO

Conrad Oh-Young

Part-Time Instructor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Graduate of the UNLV College of Education Department of Educational & Clinical Studies Doctoral Program in Special Education. Early Childhood Special Education Teacher with the Clark County School District


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

Separate and Unequal - What You Need to Know about Segregated Education for Students with Disabilities in Georgia
Limited Capacity seats available

The state of Georgia is unique in having established a state-wide educational program, "the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Supports (GNETS)” that systematically segregates students with behavioral disabilities across the state. 4,000 students with disabilities, the disproportionate majority of whom are also students of color, have been sent to the GNETS program. Most of the GNETS programs are housed in completely separate schools (including some that were formerly schools for African-American students in the Jim Crow days). Other GNETS programs are inside regular schools but typically are housed in locked wings or have separate entrances, effectively operating as a separate school within the school. GNETS students are not only segregated from their non-disabled peers but also receive an inferior education. Typically, GNETS students are not taught by certified teachers; many are primarily taught through computers. As a result, less than a third of students are able to meet academic standards. Students cannot access the basic classes they need to earn a diploma, resulting in a graduate rate of GNETS students of only 10% (compared to a statewide rate of 78%). Many GNETS programs do not provide access to basic school services like gyms, libraries, or science labs. In addition, GNETS students are deprived of important co-curricular opportunities that other students enjoy, such as playing sports or participating in the school play. Parents and students have described GNETS as similar to a prison, with no way out. In 2015, the U.S. Department of Justice investigated GNETS and found that it violates Title II of the ADA by (1) unnecessarily segregating students with disabilities from their peers and (2) providing opportunities to GNETS students that are unequal to those provided to other students throughout the state. The Georgia Coalition for Equity in Education has long advocated for the state to integrate GNETS students into their neighborhood schools. Despite this, the state has continued to defend the program. In 2016, DOJ sued the state on the grounds that the GNETS program violated the ADA. This litigation is ongoing. Come learn about how disability organizations, through litigation and advocacy, are challenging this segregated system and fighting to ensure that students with disabilities are provided educational opportunities in their neighborhood schools that are equal to those provided to their peers without disabilities. This session perfectly aligns with TASH's 2017 conference theme "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" as the presentation will focus on multifaceted efforts to dismantle a segregated and inferior educational program in favor of one that is equitable, full of opportunity, and inclusive.

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Lipson

Leslie Lipson

Attorney, Lipson Advocacy: Educational, Legal and Strategy Specialist
Talk to me about advocacy solutions using general educational and special education law, from a values-based foundation and mindset of presuming competence. My practice supports both attorneys and non-attorney advocates to succeed in school-based advocacy. Talk to me about grassroots... Read More →



Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

The Road to Communication Access Goes Through Training
Limited Capacity seats available

In the TASH Resolution on the Right to Communicate (2016), training for both communication users and their support partners is identified as a critical element of gaining "access to communication". What communication training should look like and how it can be supported in schools, agencies and community settings are important questions to look at in providing it to communication users and their support partners. The purpose of this session will be to describe the key components of the communication training process and share strategies for developing systems for training on both an organizational and geographic region level. The presenters are members of the Wellspring Guild, an organization that focuses on developing training for facilitated communication (FC) based on best practices in the use of this method of communication. One of the members of Wellspring Guild who is an experienced FC user and trainer in FC will share his story of how access to training for himself and his communication partners has enabled him to fully develop his communication skills and achieve success as a disability rights activist, training consultant, and nationally known speaker on topics such as autism, communication, and inclusion. He will also discuss his advocacy work in shaping policies that support communication rights and access to training and support services for communication users in the state that he lives in.

Speakers
avatar for Pascal Cheng

Pascal Cheng

Education and Communication Specialist, Howard Center
I currently work for the Howard Center in Burlington, Vermont as an educational and communication specialist, providing training and consultation in the areas of augmentative/alternative communication, assistive technology and literacy for children and adults with developmental disabilities... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Thresher

Tracy Thresher

Mentor and Communication Consultant, Washington County Mental Health
Tracy Thresher is a native Vermonter who lives and works in Vermont. Tracy began using Facilitated Communication in 1990 and was one of the first individuals with autism in Vermont to be introduced to the method. He has presented at local, statewide and national workshops and conferences... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

The Teacher Failure Cycle in Special Education
Limited Capacity seats available

The turnover rate for special education teachers exceeds that of other content areas. Therefore, in this presentation we will uncover the reasons special education teachers are failing to stay in the field and how this directly impacts a students learning and access in education. We will discuss our 2016-2017 survey study completed by over 400 special education teachers from 23 states. We will present our quantitative and qualitative findings as well as implication for future research, policies, and pre-service education programs. Audience members will leave with a better understanding of the teacher failure cycle in special education and ways to implement systemic changes. The session will include a PowerPoint presentation and an accompanying handout. The presentation will also facilitate an open discussion from audience members.


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

The Unknown: Suicide and People with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Understanding suicide risk factors among people with disabilities is a complex issue; not the least of which is the fact suicide is often misunderstood, under reported, and often a taboo subject. Several studies indicate that people with disabilities may be at a higher risk for suicide. For example, students with a disability have higher rates of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts than their general education peers (Wachter & Bouck, 2008). Although the suicide rate among people with disabilities as a whole is not known (Giannini et al., 2010), the presence of specific disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis (Giannini et al., 2010) as well as emotional behavioral disorders (Fleischmann, Bertolote, Belfer, & Beautrais, 2005) may increase suicide risk. However, although the presence of a disability may indicate higher suicide risk (Meltzer et al., 2012), several other confounding factors exist such as social isolation (Patterson, Dohn, Bird, & Patterson, 1983), depression (Hamrick, Goldman, Sapp, & Kohler, 2004; Wachter & Bouck, 2008), functional limitations, and the worsening of a current disability (Meltzer et al., 2011). In addition, suicide risk factors impacting all people may come into play as well but may not be fully recognized and acknowledged in people with disabilities (Grill, 1998). The purpose of this proposed presentation is to (a) discuss risk factors for suicide and how that may impact people with disabilities, (b) identify protective factors that work to diminish risk factors and implement them for people with disabilities, and (c) provide means for evaluating risk and preventing suicide attempts.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

1:10pm

What Makes a Community: The Fact and Fiction of Neo-Institutions
Limited Capacity seats available

As state institutions are closing or have been closed for many years, new segregated settings are emerging. Farmsteads, "gated communities and "intentional communities" are becoming increasingly popular models. In this session, we will talk about the myths and the truths of these communities. What makes a community? We'll review some of the history and policy behind closing institutions, and discuss the implications of new institutions as a means to further low expectations for people with disabilities. We will also feature testimony from an institution survivor who now lives successfully in the community. Finally, strategies for advocacy will be shared.


Friday December 15, 2017 1:10pm - 2:00pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Advocacy: How Can We Better Communicate Our Message to the Public and Policy-Makers?
Limited Capacity filling up

Disability used to be a non-partisan issue. With the severe Medicaid cuts being proposed, disability has become part of the political divide. This presentation will help us think about how we can frame and present our message to best influence our fellow citizens and legislators and affect public policy. Research results will be presented from the recent work of three seminal researchers: 1. Bradford Fitch, Citizen-Centric Advocacy: The Untapped Power of Constituent Engagement from the Congressional Management Foundation. 2. Rebecca Vallas, Managing Director, Poverty to Prosperity Program, Center for American Progress. 3. Beth Hollowell, Communications Research Director, American Friends Service Committee The presentation will include significant audience interaction and role-plays.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Friedman

Mark Friedman

Associate Professor, City University of New York (CUNY)
1. People with disabilities serving on boards of directors and policy making bodies.2. Online teaching.3. Disability Studies
avatar for Tia Nelis

Tia Nelis

Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L505 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

ALL Behavior is Communication
Limited Capacity filling up

This session will instruct participants how to work their way through a checklist of underlying concerns that may affect those with development differences. We will utilize a tool to address 10 areas that give clues as to why people respond the way they do. All participants will be given a bookmark they can take with them to continue the work in their own lives/practice. This approach utilizes the consult model and the idea that more heads are better than one. With that in mind, we will work through a case applying the material presented.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Heim

Michelle Heim

Regional Quality Manager, Youth Advocate Programs and Adult Services
I have been working with individuals with developmental and intellectual differences at Youth Advocate Programs and Adult Services for the last 12 years. I specialize in working with those who have an autism spectrum diagnosis. I am delighted to co-present this session with Daniel... Read More →



Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Best Practices to Support Inclusive Education for Students with Complex Health Care Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will address implications for best practices identified in three studies previously conducted by the presenters to plan for equitable access to inclusive education in school and the community for students with intellectual disabilities and complex health care needs. A review of the literature on this topic will also be incorporated into the presentation. Topics addressed will provide a practical overview of research-based and recommended best practices to support inclusive education for this population. Essential strategies to be covered will include: (a) IEP teaming to plan for inclusive education; (b) expanded health care plans and emergencies plans that address health care needs in inclusive settings; (c) disclosure of health care needs to peers without disabilities; (d) school-re-entry plans for prolonged illness or hospitalization; (e) assistive technology including teleconferencing or telehealth for students who are unable to physically attend school for temporary or prolonged periods; and (f) school-wide strategies to promote a climate of safety and belonging. The primary presenter is a parent of a child with autism and complex health care needs and a researcher that focuses on issues related to inclusive education and self-care in specialized health care procedures in school and community settings. Attendees will also be invited to join a TASH Facebook page that was established at the 2016 National TASH Conference. The public group page is titled: "Inclusion for Individuals with Disabilities and Health Care Needs" and currently has a membership representative of diverse stakeholder groups including parents and siblings, individuals with health care needs, teachers, and other professionals, and researchers. This forum will continue to serve as a means of keeping TASH members connected on issues related to inclusion for individuals with intellectual disabilities and co-existing complex health care needs.

Speakers
SB

Sarah Ballard

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Stacy Dymond

Stacy Dymond

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Stacy Dymond is professor of special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on curriculum issues related to educating secondary and transition-age students with severe intellectual disabilities in inclusive school and community settings... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Building a Good Life is More Probable When You Have an Income! How to Secure Employment for All!
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, representatives of two Connecticut organizations will describe how they have creatively secured employment for a wide range of individuals with significant disabilities. Employment options range from "the right kind of social enterprise" to self-employment/entrepreneurial ventures to customized employment with or without supports. Earning real money at wages that are equitable to those who have similar roles in business and industry, working in inclusive settings, and having employment opportunities unique to each individuals' personal strengths, interests, and preferences underlie each story told.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Podermanski

Martin Podermanski

COO, Martin Podermanski
avatar for Linda Rammler

Linda Rammler

Community Services Director, UConn UCEDD
Who YOU are and what YOU'RE doing! (Mark Partin, old TASH, new work, family...)


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Cancelled: Recruitment and Retention of Beginning Special Educators
Limited Capacity seats available

Since the Individuals with Disabilities Educational Act of 2004, students with disabilities are entitled to a free and appropriate public education. According to Heward, Albert-Morgen, and Konrad (2017), one of the purposes of this legislation was to ensure that parents have the necessary tools/ components to provide equity and opportunity for their child's education. Personnel preparation or qualified teachers are critical components to a quality education. Yet the U.S. Department of Education Report on Teacher Shortages (2013) stated that since 1990, special education has been identified as a critical shortage area in many states (Williams & Dikes, 2014). This long-term problem will continue as teacher attrition and a lack of new teachers contribute to this shortage. According to the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Post -Secondary Education, students selecting teaching as a career have declined. Enrollment in teacher preparation programs has decreased 31 percent between AY 2009-10 and AY 2012-13 (2015). This shortage of special educators can result in the hiring of teachers who lack the qualifications to teach in the classroom and have to potential to effect a quality education for students with complex support needs. The purpose of this study was to determine the career goals of special education teachers prior to their entrance in to the field as well as the school variables that would influence their decision to accept and/or remain in a teaching position. Eighty-eight student teachers responded to an online survey. Results were analyzed descriptively. The majority of student teachers had a lifetime career goal to teach in special or general education; however 19% had planned to change fields or positions. The top five variables that would influence their decision to accept a position were: a principal who understands special education, tuition reimbursement to advance education, classroom materials and technology, valuable in-service training, and lastly, a yearly stipend. The top five variables that would influence their decision to remain in a teaching position were a: manageable caseload, principal who understands special education, mentor program, yearly stipend, and additional planning periods. The importance of a skilled principal is discussed.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

DeafBlind Interpreting: Aiming for Equal Access
Limited Capacity seats available

Due to a national shortage of qualified interpreters for people that are DeafBlind, Western Oregon University is now conducting research on ProTactile American Sign Language (PTASL) is a promising practice that is changing the way DeafBlind people interface with one another and the community around them. Fueled by the desire for autonomy, DeafBlind leaders are rising up to provide training and resources to other DeafBlind individuals with the goal of changing their community. Now, as part of this federally funded grant project, DeafBlind leaders will train interpreters on the use of PTASL with DeafBlind consumers.


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Learning About One's Self: Experiences of Students with ASD in a University Intro to ASD Class
Limited Capacity seats available

The On-Campus Transition Partnership (OCTP) is a collaborative program between a local school division and Radford University. Post-high school students (who continue to qualify for IEP services) with complex support needs participate in a variety of classes, jobs, and experiences on campus based on their interests and goals. Some choose to explore their own disability through an Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder class. Students in OCTP as well as university students who identify with ASD have participated in the class with different learning goals, but all come out with a greater understanding of their ASD. This session will share these individual students'€™ experiences within this class as well as strategies for adapting the curriculum to accommodate student needs and identified learning goals. Everyone in the class benefits by learning from students with ASD about their personal experiences, technology they use, and supports they find effective. The reciprocal benefits to all students will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Leslie Daniel

Leslie Daniel

Associate Professor, Radford University
People can talk to me about: Supporting people with autism Positive Behavior Supports Inclusive Education The weather...
avatar for Johnna Elliott

Johnna Elliott

Program Coordinator / Teacher, Montgomery County Public Schools
I am Johnna. I coordinate and teach a collaborative program between my school division and Radford University called the On Campus Transition Partnership. This program is for post high school aged students through age 21. I have worked in public schools as a special education teacher... Read More →
avatar for Rebekah Grooten

Rebekah Grooten

Student, Radford University



Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Music, Yoga, and Community: Pathways to Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

As inclusion has become increasingly supported amongst the mainstream culture, the opportunity for new and innovative inclusive community recreation and leisure programs has grown. Tempo! Music Therapy Services is an inclusive community-based practice offering music therapy, music classes, music lessons, and yoga. As the practice has grown, so has its involvement within its community, including expanded services across the lifespan. Responding to changing needs in that community, offerings have shifted to adding inclusive open mic nights, performances at the local Farmer's Market, and Accessible Yoga programs, while maintaining inclusive recitals. This session will provide information regarding responding to community needs while embracing inclusion as the norm in developing music and yoga programs. Reflections, challenges encountered, and growth opportunities will be shared.

Speakers
AG

Angela Guerriero

Tempo! Music Therapy
Angela Guerriero, MEd, MA, MT-BC, is the director of Tempo! Music Therapy Services in West Chester, PA and Nutley, NJ. She is a doctoral candidate at Drexel University (ABD), studying creative arts in therapy and is an assistant professor in the department of music education at West... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
M302 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Self Determination and Self Advocacy in Post Secondary Education: How to prepare students with disabilities in high school for college
Limited Capacity seats available

In Wisconsin, there are options for students with disabilities who wish to transition from high school to college. In the past, the majority of transitional planning for students with ID 18-21 focused on supported employment. The Madison School District Campus Connect Program at Madison Area Technical College provides fully inclusive post secondary education for students with disabilities seeking degree certificates. Learn how to prepare students with disabilities for college using self-determination and self advocacy strategies that will transfer to the post secondary environment. This presentation will include a student's perspective and insight about college life compared to high school.


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Think, PPAIRR, Share! A Framework for Supporting Students with Complex Communication Needs in Text-Based Conversations
Limited Capacity seats available

Interactive reading experiences provide a natural context for the development of a language proficiency, literary confidence, and genuine friendship. Embedding peer-implemented intervention strategies within the context of shared reading routines for students with complex communication needs enhances individual competencies, and enriches the perceptions of classroom communication partners. Teachers who facilitate reading PPAIRRS (Pair up; Preview; Actively read; Inspire; Reflect; Reinforce) strengthen capacity for peers to support communicative attempts of students with complex communication needs, increase the text-based conversational skills of students with complex communication needs and their peers, and foster opportunities for friendships to develop as a result of students celebrating and persevering through complex texts together.

Speakers
avatar for Meghan Edwards-Bowyer

Meghan Edwards-Bowyer

Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Wearable Technology and Improving Time Management
Limited Capacity seats available

As poor employment rates of individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are examined, the need to increase self-determination skills continues to be evident in relation to employability and job retention. The purpose of this presentation is to review a tech in action manuscript written to provide teachers or practitioners with a strategy they can use to help increase and promote time management skills in students or young adults with ID. Using wearable technology (i.e., Fitbit smart watch) and a smartphone, the tech in action manuscript examines a strategy where four steps are used to implement a task analysis to teach students with ID to set alarms based on his or her daily schedule. The steps include: (a) establishing routines, (b) identifying technology and pairing devices, (c) instruction, and (d) monitoring progress. A current post-secondary education student with autism will demonstrate the strategy.


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Welcome to My Celebration-My IEP Party
Limited Capacity seats available

We will share our unique approach for promoting self advocacy by celebrating the gifts and dreams of our students and their families through their IEP Party. The essential collaborative elements consisting of visioning with MAPS and inclusion of ALL team members including students, families, and peers.


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
M304 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

What Makes a Good DSP?
Limited Capacity seats available

Good lives for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are contingent on the commitment to and implementation of high-quality supports with a significant focus on elevating the quality of life for this population. For many people with I/DD, these supports include paid staffers known as Direct Support Professionals (DSPs). This presentation seeks to answer the question, "What makes a good Direct Support Professional?" The presenter is very passionate about this topic, having begun her career in disability supports and advocacy as a DSP in December 2002 "exclusively providing direct supports for the next eleven years“ where she observed examples of both ideal DSPs and those with questionable ethics. Additionally, her brother has cerebral palsy and a mild intellectual disability, and receives paid supports at his place of employment. To her, this topic is just as important personally as it is professionally.

Speakers
avatar for Raquel Rosa

Raquel Rosa

Representative Payee Project Analyst, National Disability Rights Network
Raquel is the eldest sibling of a young man who has cerebral palsy. Her career as an advocate for disability justice began 17 years ago, providing direct supports to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In 2010, she co-founded DC Metro Sibs, the Washington, DC-based... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

What Success Looks Like
Limited Capacity seats available

Gage Robinson is a 14 year old self-advocate, who with his mother, founded Gage Gives Back, a non-profit organization that was created to share information and understanding about people with traumatic brain injury, and shaken baby syndrome. Until last school year, Gage's educational path was dismal. He received home-bound services, with the exception of one hour per day that he was bused to a neighboring county away from his home, where he spent the one hour in a segregated education setting.Gage now is fully supported within his neighborhood school, attending 8th grade with his peers and being successfully included across the entire school day. He wants to be a motivational speaker when he grows up, and is here to tell you why.Creating successful educational outcomes within inclusive settings, especially for those students who have the most complex of needs, can be achieved simply through creating a new norm. Establishing a paradigm where we think, talk, write, and act in strength-based ways on children's behalf, we can truly know what success looks like. This presentation will share the magic, the specific strategies, and the stories of many individuals, just like Gage, who are finding extreme success within inclusive schools.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Sommerness, Ed.S.

Jennifer Sommerness, Ed.S.

Adjunct Professor; Educational Consultant, University of St Thomas; Welcome Spoken Here
Jennifer Sommerness, Ed.S., is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at the University of St. Thomas. She has spent the past 25 years studying best practices for inclusive education, as well as the areas of educational administration and professional development... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 3:05pm
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

2:15pm

Deej – The Movie
As written by DJ Savarese (Deej), co-producer of his movie: “I won the lottery when my parents adopted me from foster care; I won it again when they included me in regular education. Now, I seek to help kids much less fortunate than I by showing people what a nonspeaking student with autism can do. In Deej, the camera intrudes on every aspect of my life. If seeing truly is believing, then perhaps eyes can be opened to the full potential of kids with significant disabilities. Shot over a six-year period, Deej reveals not only what the ideal of full inclusion requires but also what it can accomplish.”  Shows six years of Deej’s life, from high school through his first two years of college. A panel of self-advocates will host a Q&A session following the film.

Moderators
avatar for Judy Bailey

Judy Bailey

Consultant on AAC/FC/RPM and Positive Supports, Judy C. Bailey Consulting
Judy C. Bailey, M.Ed., currently consults with individuals and families on using pointing, spelling, and typing to communicate, including work on FC Training and Rapid Prompting Method. Ms. Bailey is an endorsed Positive Behavior Support (PBS) Facilitator in Virginia. She serves on... Read More →

Friday December 15, 2017 2:15pm - 4:10pm
L507 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Building the Foundation for Financial Independence
Limited Capacity seats available

We will cover the methods the Credit-Able program is using to ensure that people with disabilities of all ages are financially literate and know how to manage their money. We will also cover the tools available for assistive technology acquisition in Georgia, including Credit-Able, gTrade, Dollars and Sense and other local resources.

Speakers

Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L504 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Effects of Performance Feedback and Self-Monitoring on Implementation Fidelity of Systematic Instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to explore two training methods for improving pre-service special education teachers' implementation fidelity of systematic instruction. Participants were enrolled in a university course targeting systematic instruction for students with severe disabilities. Participants either received video performance feedback or utilized self-monitoring checklists to improve their implementation of two prompting systems. Implications for practice, limitations, and future research will be addressed.

Speakers
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education and Child Development, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education and Child Development at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with extensive support needs in Atlanta... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L405 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Employment Exploration leads to Desire for Employment: New Supports for Community-Based Employment
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you want a job? How could you answer this question if you have never had volunteer experience or held a job in high school or in the summer? For individuals with disabilities who have not had the typical exposures to work that most other young adults have, person-centered planning focused on employment must begin with exploration and discovery. MCOs are embracing this challenge. A new service, Exploration, is designed to help an individual make an informed choice about the type of employment they would like to pursue. The service includes introductory activities to identify interests and skills and includes business tours, job shadowing or informational interviews and is highly individualized. Another service, Discovery, supports individuals to more deeply investigate how a determined interest translates to a work environment. In this presentation, Amerigroup will share some of their experiences with these new services and getting people successfully employed in communities. State service providing agencies are under new pressures to get people with disabilities in to the workforce. Current policy directions support "Employment First" as the service that should take priority for supporting someone during the day. The HCBS settings Final Rule has set new parameters for the characteristics and qualities required for community-based employment services. The Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act requires access to several stages of educational and vocational rehabilitation services to engage youth with disabilities in employment prior to being sent to workshop or day habilitation services. But if a high school student or young adult has not been exposed to work that most other youth are experiencing, from what perspective can they consider their options for employment? This challenge has several aspects. First, is setting expectations. Parents expect or require that their "typical" children will work, but may have reservations about holding this expectation for their children with disabilities. Expectations are also set in schools, and the extent to which students are in more segregated or specialized settings, the greater the chances that expectations for their employment are reduced. The economy outside the school system also figures into the equation in a limited job market, how do we encourage employers to consider hiring youth with unique challenges and skill sets? How do the rest of us decide what we might like to do for employment, and conversely, what we would avoid? We learn through experiencing different aspects of employment or through relationships with peers, family members, siblings who are working or exploring employment themselves. This session will describe the Exploration and Discovery Services that Amerigroup is using in a Medicaid managed care program for individuals with I/DD. Several characteristics of the service are crucial to its impact on improving the employability of people with disabilities; the duration of the service; the rate for the service, the flexibility of the service, how initial assessment informs the service, and how the individual's experience from the exploration service is incorporated in their person-centered plan.

Speakers
PN

Patricia Nobbie

Director, Disability Policy Engagement, Anthem


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L508 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Examining Access to Inclusive Settings and Practices through a Cultural Historical Activity Theory Lens
Limited Capacity seats available

This qualitative study investigated how activity systems afford or constrain access to inclusive practices and settings for special education teacher candidates. Three special education teacher candidates participating in a fieldwork practicum seminar were interviewed. A cultural historical activity theory lens was applied to the interview sessions. Cultural historical activity theory can be useful in understanding teacher learning processes. Rules, community, and division of labor were three themes that emerged from the data analysis. Findings reveal implications for teacher education focused on access, mentorship, expansive learning, and feedback-reflection cycles.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda L. Miller

Amanda L. Miller

Assistant Professor, SUNY Cortland
Amanda Miller is an Assistant Professor in the Foundations and Social Advocacy Department at the State University of New York College at Cortland (SUNY Cortland). Her research focuses on the lived experiences of girls of color with intellectual and developmental disabilities, teacher... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L403 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Friends Matter: Improving Social Interaction Opportunities between Students with and without IDD
Limited Capacity seats available

Friendships are personally valuable and developmentally important relationships for all people, yet friendships between students with and without intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) remain infrequent, even in inclusive classrooms.

Speakers
avatar for Zach Rossetti

Zach Rossetti

Associate Professor, Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development
Zachary Rossetti, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Special Education in the Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development. His research examines the experiences of families with children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including autism, by... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L402 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Gen X & Millennials: Leaders of the Next Generation
Limited Capacity seats available

As long-time leaders of the disability rights movement are aging and exiting the field, a new generation of leaders is rising. In today's workforce, we should expect to shift roles and positions across numerous organizations, rather than maintain the same job for the entirety of a career. We want to hear from ALL perspectives including those who are unrepresented to engage in discussion about our role in this movement. In this breakout session, we will discuss challenges and opportunities as well as the threats we face on the road to full inclusion unique to the current job market and the professionalization of our field. Whether you identify as a new, emerging, or an established leader, we welcome you to join in this discussion with like minded individuals about what we are all working towards and how we will get there.

Speakers
avatar for Alison DeYoung

Alison DeYoung

Project Manager, YES! Center / TASH
Alison DeYoung is the Project Manager for the Youth Employment Solutions (YES!) Center, the national training and technical assistance center for the Partnerships in Employment (PIE) states. She began working in the field of education in 2008 while completing her undergraduate and... Read More →
avatar for O. Sophia Johansson

O. Sophia Johansson

Chair, Board of Directors, Mass Families Organizing for Change
I serve as Board Chair of a family organization, Mass Families Organizing for Change. Our mission is to provide sustained advocacy and leadership training in pursuit of high quality, individualized community support and service options, including family support, for people with disabilities... Read More →
avatar for Ahmad Rahman

Ahmad Rahman

Ahmad Rahman was born in Lahore, Pakistan and moved to the United States when he was 12 years old to gain access to a stronger education system. In 2016, he graduated from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) in Integrative Community Studies, a four-year certificate... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L406 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Love Shouldn't Hurt
Limited Capacity seats available

The "Love Shouldn't Hurt" workshop will address the issues of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of the aging and disabled populations- two of the most vulnerable segments of our society. The workshop will present statistics to show the prevalence of these issues and how they impact survivors and families. The participants will be given information on how to recognize abuse and potential abusers. They will also be provided with information on how to find resources to help themselves or the victims. Participants will have the opportunity to participate in a special, creative, empowerment project.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Sistare-Harkins

Lisa Sistare-Harkins

Chairman- Board of Directors and volunteer, Walton Options for Independent Living
I have been a part of Walton Options for over 13 years in several capacities. Currently I am the Board Chair and a volunteer at the office. The workshop I am co-presenting is called "Love Shouldn't Hurt" and is about domestic violence and abuse among the elderly and people with any... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M303 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

My Journey with Augmentative Alternative Communication
Limited Capacity seats available

As a 15 year old who is living with physical disabilities, it has been challenging to find a way to communicate. Without effective communication, it is impossible to be included in education, leisure and advocacy efforts. This session will provide a brief glimpse into my life and how I learned to communicate early in life and how that communication has evolved over time.


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L506 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Student-Led IEPs
Limited Capacity seats available

Self-determination, and the related concept of self-advocacy, have long been promoted by policymakers, researchers, persons with disabilities, family members and advocates. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires that students 16 of age or greater participate, when appropriate, in the development of their individualized education program (some states require that process to start earlier). Student-led IEPs are a form of self-determination and advocacy that can be an important strategy to assure equity and full participation. Research suggests that when students lead their IEP meetings, there are positive academic, social, and adult outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities . Studies also show, however, that few students are actively involved in the IEP process. For example one study reports students with no training in leading an IEP talk only 3% of the time and another study confirmed students felt that they have only a minimal role at their IEP meeting. The extent to which students are leading their IEP meetings across the country and what factors contribute to successful student led facilitation remain uncertain. This session explores these factors, including discussion of survey data from two national advocacy organizations, the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates and TASH regarding member experiences with student-led IEPs.

Speakers
avatar for Tia Nelis

Tia Nelis

Director of Policy & Advocacy, TASH
Tia Nelis is the Director of Policy & Advocacy for TASH. She comes to TASH after serving as Self-Advocacy Specialist at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center within the Institute on Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. She also is one of... Read More →


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
M301 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

Teaching People with Intellectual Disability to Participate in Faith Communities
Limited Capacity seats available

An important part of quality of life for people with moderate and severe intellectual disability (MSD) is being involved in community activities, including participation in faith communities. There is a need for meaningful inclusion of people with disabilities in faith communities beyond physical presence. Although it has been recommended that evidence-based strategies, such as video modeling (VM) be used to increase the meaningful inclusion of people with ID in faith communities, there is a lack of empirical studies using evidence-based practices to teach the skills necessary for participation in community activities. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of evidence-based practices in teaching people with ID to participate in a community activity. This study consisted of a multiple probe across behaviors design to analyze the effect of VM and a system of least prompts (SLP) on participation in faith communities for persons with ID. The experimental design was replicated across participants and settings in different faith communities. The data indicated that VM and SLP were effective in increasing the number of steps in a task analysis completed by each participant. Additionally, each participant demonstrated maintenance and generalization of learned behaviors.

Speakers
avatar for Victoria Slocum

Victoria Slocum

Instructor, University of Kentucky
My research interests are faith inclusion and sexuality & relationship education.


Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L404 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

3:20pm

The Power of Inclusive Education Across Grade Levels: Damian Jr.'s Journey
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session, family & school champion-advocates will share the powerful success story of Damian Jr., a gifted teenager with complex medical needs who has experienced inclusive education across grade levels. In the 2011 TASH Conference, a panel featured this young man's journey while in pilot program during his 1st grade year that outlined a solid framework for inclusive education for students with significant disabilities. Now, Damian Jr. is in 8th grade and continues to excel in inclusive settings in the midst of the complexities, challenges, and barriers. The family & school champion-advocates will explore strategies for strengths-based learning, communication, and collaboration for inclusive educational settings that support people with complex support needs.

Speakers
ZY

Zarat Y. Boyd

Dr. Zarat Y. Boyd has over 18 years of experience empowering people to discover, develop, and maximize their full potential. She serves as President & Chief Learning Officer of MaxLife, Inc. www.themaxlifesolution.com, a consulting practice for leaders & leadership teams, since 2003... Read More →



Friday December 15, 2017 3:20pm - 4:10pm
L401 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303