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2017 TASH Conference has ended

Each year, the TASH Conference brings together a diverse community of stakeholders who gain information, learn about resources, and connect with others across the country to strengthen the disability field. This year’s conference theme, “Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion,” shows the resilience of individuals with disabilities and their families across the lifespan. Conference attendees will celebrate their passion for disability rights, civil rights, and human rights while exploring inclusive communities, schools, and workplaces that support people with disabilities, including those with complex support needs. Return to TASH website.


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Poster Presentations [clear filter]
Thursday, December 14
 

4:29pm

About Poster Presentations
Poster Presentations capture information about a particular topic in the form of printed text and graphics. Poster presentations are displayed on 36" x 48" boards on easels. Poster presentations are shared during a two-hour period in a large room with other poster presentations.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:29pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

A Collaborative Approach to Supporting Preschool Children in Inclusive Settings
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will highlight the multi-agency collaboration of the Denver Great Kids Head Start program to support children with a wide range of needs in inclusive preschool classrooms. The importance of effective early intervention for young children with disabilities and social-emotional challenges and their families is well documented. It is critical to provide quality supports and services for children in the early childhood settings utilizing research based practices for successful inclusion. Programs need to be supported by strong leadership, quality and meaningful professional development and access to ongoing behavioral and early childhood special education expertise. It is also critical that families are involved in all aspects of the child's program to build positive relationships with the staff as well as to support and nurture their young children at home. These efforts must be supported by ongoing collaborative and planning to address both the needs of young children but also classroom teaching staff. Denver's Great Kids Head Start is a multi-agency collaboration of the Mayor's Office for Education and Children, Denver Health (Early Childhood Mental Health Specialists), Sewell Child Development Center and Denver Public Schools to support approximately twelve hundred at-risk preschool children in six delegates. While Head Start mandates a minimum of 10% of these children are identified with special education needs, the agency serves a much higher number of children with developmental delays and significant emotional and mental health challenges. This session will highlight best practices in supporting inclusion of your children and supporting families in staff through examples of tools and processes that promote collaboration and development of classroom plans with individualizations for behavior and social emotional supports and address the unique needs of children with identified special education disabilities. Family partnerships and advocacy strategies as the children transition into Kindergarten will also be addressed. Participants will leave with a conceptual framework, best practice tools and strategies and successful family advocacy and transition ideas.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

A Literature Review of Studies Involving Paraprofessional-Implemented Systematic Instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this review was to summarize single-case intervention studies involving paraprofessional-implemented systematic instruction. Studies were synthesized to summarize participant and setting characteristics, intervention characteristics, and the quality of the studies. Intervention effect across study participants was calculated and moderator analyses were conducted to determine whether specific study characteristics influenced intervention outcomes. Implications for practice, limitations, and areas for future research will be addressed.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Kammes

Rebecca Kammes

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Michigan State University
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education and Child Development, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Virginia L. Walker, PhD, BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education and Child Development at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dr. Walker began her career as a special education teacher of students with extensive support needs in Atlanta... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Addressing Health Literacy and Health Advocacy in Transition Aged Youth with ASD and ID
Limited Capacity seats available

This will be a presentation of a literature analysis that results in research questions and an action plan. The topics explored will be health literacy and health advocacy in young adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and health curricula for transition aged youth.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Affect of the ADA on Sports, Workplace, and Education
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation focuses on the affect that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has on sports, workplace, and education. The project highlights how the ADA has helped contribute to many successes, but also shows the many struggles that individuals with disabilities still face in the fields of sports, work, and school.

Speakers
avatar for Bailey Bihn

Bailey Bihn

I am a junior at Northern Arizona University. I am majoring in pre-physical therapy with a minor in disability studies.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

An Analysis of Parent/Guardian Components of Sex Ed Curriculums for Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Sexuality is a tough topic to address with all adolescents, but can be even more challenging with adolescents who also have an intellectual disability. When discussing barriers to teaching sex education to individuals with intellectual disabilities, service providers mention lack of time and lack of training, but also underscore the impact that the family members culture, beliefs, and involvement have on the process (Murphy et al., 2015). Family members are a very important resource when discussing sexuality, and one that is often overlooked or ignored. The focus tends to be more on instructional content (Eastgate et al., 2012), rather than the impact of who is delivering the information. A literature and curriculum review will be presented to explores parent and guardian involvement in sex education teaching and within sex education curricula. The review focuses on three key features: parents' perceived level of involvement, how sex education curricula involves parents (e.g. handouts or homework to be done at home), and the perceived role parents play in teaching sex education. Research gaps in these areas will be discussed. Additionally, the impact that this knowledge has on curricula implementation, and next steps for further understanding of family member involvement in the teaching of sex education to adolescents with intellectual disabilities will also be discussed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

AT for People with Sensory Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will cover the assistive technology available for people with sensory disabilities. We will discuss how to conduct a sensory assessment and then cover hardware and software that can be used to stimulate/soothe various senses.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Availability and Quality of HIV Supports for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) framework was used to conduct a needs assessment of the availability and quality of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in the Atlanta metropolitan area. This poster will present the findings of the four phases of this research project. Findings from the research will inform organizations and policymakers on how to provide persons with disabilities better access to HIV/AIDS care and services. Although there is limited research about individuals with IDD and HIV/AIDS, recent reviews indicate that this subgroup is often at increased risk for HIV infection due to poverty, lack of adequate sexual health education, vulnerability to sexual exploitation and assault, and barriers to accessing needed services and supports (Aderemi, Pillay, & Esterhuizen, 2013; Groce, Trasi, & Yousafza 2008; Hanass-Hancock & Alli, 2014; Hanass-Hancock, Chappell, & Pretorius, 2014; Rohleder, 2010). This research is critical and is aligned with this conference's theme of "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion". This community-university research partnership focused on inclusion, empowerment and the need to highlight the voices of traditionally marginalized groups (i.e. individuals with IDD and people affected by HIV/AIDS.. This poster presentation is intended to educate others on how to successfully include people with IDD in evaluations that address significant disparities in supports and services that are might otherwise go unaddressed.

Speakers
avatar for Andy Roach

Andy Roach

Associate Professor/Associate Director, Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University
Andrew Roach, Ph.D. is Associate Director of the Center for Leadership in Disability (CLD)—a University Center for Excellence in Disability (UCEDD) at Georgia State University. He is an associate professor with joint appointments in the Department of Counseling and Psychological... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Better Workforce Means Better Outcomes: Supporting Employment Consultants
Limited Capacity seats available

Given the discrepancies between the desires of people with IDD regarding employment and the reality, it is essential to bolster the work employment consultants do on a daily basis. The role of employment consultants requires research and attention to practice. The ThinkWork project, at the Institute for Community Inclusion, continues to explore the role and activities of employment consultants. Current projects have focused on both qualitative and quantitative input from employment consultants, which has informed the development of a comprehensive model of employment supports for job seekers with IDD.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Kelly Nye-Lengerman

Research Associate, University of Minnesota


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Brain-Computer Interface Technology: Communication Usability for People with Autism and Cerebral Palsy
Limited Capacity seats available

Augmentative and alternative communication (ACC) enables individuals to access communication, leading to more equitable opportunities and inclusion in schools and communities. This research study examines the usability of an emerging assistive technology, a brain-computer interface (BCI), for the purpose of communication among people with cerebral palsy (CP) and autism. BCIs are systems that "interpret brain activity directly, enabling communication and control by individuals with minimal or no reliable motor function" (Peters, et. al, 2015, p. 1). BCIs rely on brain activity to interact with a computer, rather than volitional motor control (Fried-Oken, Mooney, Peters, & Oken, 2015). Therefore, BCIs have the potential to serve as an ACC for people with complex communication challenges and motor difficulties. This presentation aligns with the 2017 conference theme by focusing on ACC as a method of inclusion for people with complex communication support needs. The research question guiding this study is: To what extent can individuals with varying levels of functional speech use the BCI to achieve AAC competencies? This study employed a single-subject experimental design to study "behavior change an individual exhibits as a result of some treatment" (Gay, Mills, & Airasian, 2012, p. 294). Ten participants (five with CP and five with autism) participated in a series of up to 14 sessions to learn to use a BCI called Think to Speak. Data collection with six participants is complete, one participant is currently underway, and three participants are scheduled in the summer. Preliminary data suggest that participants are able to learn to operate the BCI to generate a one-word response within the limited number of sessions, but not able to reliably generate appropriate responses between two or more different words. Results will discuss limitations to the BCI, as well as recommendations for future practice and research.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Character Strengths as a Facilitator of Successful Employment Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

Positive psychology -- the study, development, and application of activities to enhance positive emotions, psychological well-being, and optimal functioning - offers new insight toward understanding human behavior and aligning positive psychology theories and interventions to foster behavior change. Character strengths is one such theory. Character strengths offer a framework for understanding who we are at our core and how to leverage those strengths to improve outcomes in multiple areas of one's life. This presentation will review three ways character strengths can be facilitators of employment outcomes: 1) Build job seeker hope and self-efficacy through a deeper understanding of who the jobseeker is at their core. 2) Identify tangible strengths the jobseeker brings to a new job along with language to share those strengths in an interview. 3) Offer insight into which strengths the jobseeker is likely to rely on once they are on the job and ways in which the jobseeker, the job coach and other supports can explore using character strengths to be successful during the job search and on the job.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Jennings

Elizabeth Jennings

Deputy Director, National Disability Institute
Excited to share field-tested strategies for improving the financial well-being of people with disabilities.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Community Perspectives: Advancing Post-Secondary Education for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) share the same post-school goals as their peers without disabilities to attend college, secure employment, and contribute to their community. Although legislation, policy initiatives, and improved transition service delivery have begun equipping students to achieve these goals, the transition outcomes for many students still fall short of their expectations. Data show that only 27% of youth with intellectual disability attend any type of post-secondary education program within two years of graduation (Newman et al., 2011). Students enrolled in these programs experience more inclusion in their communities and higher levels of employment. Graduates are 26% more likely to exit a vocational rehabilitation program with employment, and earn a 73% higher weekly income. Moreover, after participating in post-secondary education programs, youth report increased satisfaction across several domains including personal relationships, self-determination, and social inclusion (Migliore, Butterworth, & Hart, 2009). New approaches are needed to identify ways school systems, parents, youth with disabilities, and local campuses might work together to develop new and high-quality options for post-secondary education in their communities. One promising approach to facilitate these collaborations is community conversations (Carter et al., 2009). Community conversations use the World Café model (Brown & Isaacs, 2005) to bring diverse stakeholders together to address barriers facing their community. Attendees generate innovative, solutions-focused ideas over series of small and large-group conversations, and build relationships to support sustainable action after the event. This presentation focuses on "community conversations"€ as a practical and asset-based approach to support the development of post-secondary education programs. As part of our Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID) grant, we conducted a mixed methods study to learn how three geographically and economically diverse communities within one state might implement community conversations to launch efforts to develop new higher education options for local youth with IDD. Through this study we sought to understand: (a) effective strategies planning teams used to engage with local campuses; (b) attendee perspectives on what an inclusive program might look like on their campus; (c) attendee perceptions of the people, resources, or supports that would be critical for success, and (d) how planning teams used the ideas generated at their events to spur future action. We will share our findings from these three community conversation events as well as strategies that any stakeholder (including families, service providers, post-secondary educators, and people with disabilities) might use to begin conversations about higher education for youth with IDD in their community. References Brown, J. Isaacs, D. (2005). The World Café: Shaping our Futures Through Conversations that Matter. Barrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc: San Francisco. Carter, E. W., Owens, L., Swedeen, B., Trainor, A. A., Thompson, C., Ditchman, N., & Cole, O. (2009). Conversations that matter: Engaging communities to expand employment opportunities for youth with disabilities. Teaching Exceptional Children, 41, 38-46. Migliore, A., Butterworth, J., & Hart, D. (2009). Postsecondary education and employment outcomes for youth with intellectual disabilities. Think College. Newman, L., Wagner, M., Knokey, A.-M., Marder, C., Nagle, K., Shaver, D., Wei, X., with Cameto, R., Contreras, E., Ferguson, K., Greene, S., and Schwarting, M. (2011). The Post-High School Outcomes of Young Adults With Disabilities up to 8 Years After High School. A Report From the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) (NCSER 2011-3005). Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer L. Bumble

Jennifer L. Bumble

Doctoral Student, Vanderbilt University
Jennifer Bumble, M.Ed. is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked as a special educator in Texas and an ESL educator in South Korea. Jennifer also worked as an educational consultant with the Vanderbilt... Read More →
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Professor, Vanderbilt University
Erik is Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Special Education at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He completed his doctoral work in the area of severe disabilities at Vanderbilt University and his undergraduate work in Christian Education at Wheaton College. His research... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Comprehensive Reading Instruction: Evidence-based Practices to Support Literacy and Language in the Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will share a review of research on comprehensive reading instruction with students with significant disabilities. Findings will address intervention components, instructional methods, and outcomes. Recommendations for use of evidence-based literacy practices in the classroom will be discussed.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Differentiated Instruction to Promote Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion for All Learners
Limited Capacity seats available

This session addresses the topic of inclusion with particular focus on how pre-service teachers can differentiate instruction to maximize equity, opportunity, and inclusion for all learners. Pre-service teachers conduct interviews with teachers in the field to determine how the teacher addresses individual learning differences, including individual student diversity (academic, cultural, and linguistic), areas of interests, and learning styles.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Effects of AAC Intervention for Children with Disabilities at Perlocutionary Language Stage
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an AAC intervention for children with severe and multiple disabilities at the perlocutionary stage. This study is relation to possibilities of AAC intervention for changing of communication stage of children at the perlocutionary stage. The participants of this study were three children using non-symbolic expression modes at the perlocutionary stage. The study design was a multiple prove baseline design across subjects. The intervention program was consisted in most-to least prompt system and play activities using sense of touch, auditory sense and kinesthetic sense. Clinical Implications will be discussed.

Speakers
KH

Kyung-Im Han

Professor, Changwon National University
Kyung-Im Han is a professor in the Department of Special Education, Changwon National University, South Korea. Her research interest is on physical disabilities, augmentative and alternative communication, grounded theory, subjective study and teaching strategies for students with... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Effects of Positive Behavior Support for Class-Related Behaviors of Children with Cerebral Palsy
Limited Capacity seats available

Research findings of a empirical study will be presented in this session. This study investigated the effects of positive behavior support for class-related behaviors of children with cerebral palsy who had problem behaviors. Three kindergarten children with cerebral palsy participated in the study. A multiple baseline across subjects design were used to examine a functional relation between mediating strategy and class-related behaviors. Results of the study indicated that positive behavior support was effective in increasing attention concentration and instruction compliance of children with cerebral palsy and maintaining the increased behaviors. In addition, positive behavior support was effective in increasing on-task and peer collaboration behaviors. Also, limitations and suggestions for future research will be discussed.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Employment Skills in Motion: The Use of Video-Based Instruction to Promote Employment-Related Social Behaviors for High School Students with Severe Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation summarizes the effects of video-based instruction on the individualized employment-related social behaviors of five high school students with intellectual disability. For all students, the intervention increased target behaviors and sustained task engagement. Attendees will gain valuable information regarding social skills development and employment preparation within secondary schools.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Engaging Students with Disabilities through Robotics
Limited Capacity seats available

The author discusses the importance of engaging students with disabilities in informal STEM activities. The presentation will provide information about IDEA and IEPs as they relate to extracurricular activities. The author will present current research along with her personal experiences of coaching a team of students with autism to compete in a robotics competitions. Lastly, resources on how to start or join a robotics team will be provided.

Speakers
avatar for Karin Fisher

Karin Fisher

Assistant Professor, Georgia Southern University
I am a former high school teacher of students with disabilities and am now a professor for pre and inservice teachers. My research interests include increasing students with disabilities participation in STEM activities.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Evaluating Use of Skip Counting Number Lines and Dot Notation Math to Teach Multiplication to Students with ID
Limited Capacity seats available

Dot-notation math began as a strategy that used fixed reference points on numbers to facilitate counting and was later applied to addition, subtraction, money concepts and multiplication. Dot-notation is a strategy used by some to teach mathematical skills to students with disabilities. While studies have investigated effectiveness with addition and subtraction, experimental studies examining the effectiveness of dot-notation math to teach multiplication to students with disabilities have not been conducted. The importance of using effective evidence-based instructional strategies is crucial for learners with disabilities. Despite lack of applicable research support, dot-notation math is often used in school districts. This study was designed to extend the limited research on dot-notation math and to examine it's effectiveness in teaching multiplication skills. An ABABC design was used to examine the efficacy of dot-notation math to teach multiplication to four 7th and 8th grade middle school students with intellectual disabilities. Skip-counting skills are a prerequisite for dot notation multiplication and students were assessed and taught to skip-count using numberlines in a prebaseline condition. Subsequently, three conditions were implemented: baseline (A), intervention using skip-counting numberlines (B), and intervention teaching use of dot-notation math to solve single-digit multiplication problems (C). Intervention condition C was comprised of direct instruction, modeling use of dot-notation, and using least-to-most prompting to teach single-digit multiplication. Additionally, procedural and inter-rater reliability and social validity data were collected. Visual analysis was used to evaluate student performance during each condition and demonstrated that use of skip-counting numberlines were effective. However, student interviews indicated that students did not understand the concept of multiplication when using only numberlines. The addition of intervention condition C teaching dot-notation increased multiplication skills and student verbal behavior explaining multiplication concepts. Percent of nonoverlapping data provided a measure of effect size, indicating the effectiveness of skip-counting numberlines and dot-notation. It is important to note that in addition to being identified with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities, students were also identified with autism, ADHD, and other health impairments. One student was an English Language Learner. Students represented social economic status of low and middle-income families with two students on free/reduced lunch status. Students were ethnically diverse as well representing Hispanic/Latino, Asian, White and Native American groups of people. The study included two males and two females. This degree of diversity is important in that it helps to indicate the applicability of the procedures for a diverse group of students.

Speakers
AF

Andrea Forsyth

Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Reno


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

How to Make Teacher Created Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Academics
Limited Capacity seats available

Providing high-quality special education services in rural settings has a variety of challenges such as geographic isolation and a lack of resources. One particularly challenging aspect of rural special education is a lack of highly trained personnel, especially when providing general curriculum access for students with autism. Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) is one way to provide high-quality specialized instruction that does not require the attention of another teacher nor a paraprofessional while still possessing the ability to implement research-based specially designed instruction with fidelity. These aspects make CAI a viable instructional strategy within inclusive settings that addresses frequent barriers for inclusion in the rural South. The purpose of this poster is to provide teachers with step-by-step instructions for how to create their own CAI programs that can be customized to meet their student's individual needs. The poster also provides specific examples and discusses considerations for teachers when creating their own CAI programs.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

I'm at the Center
Limited Capacity seats available

Growing up with an intellectual disability, we are often told what to do without being asked if that's something we want or even like. We wake up, and we're told what to wear. We go to school, and we're told what to learn. The weekend comes, and we're told what "fun" activity has been planned. Now, it's time for us to make our own decisions. We want to work and live on our own and this is the first step. We are going to explain and demonstrate how we plan, implement, and lead our person-centered planning meetings. First, we decide who we want to invite. We consider those who are important to us and those who have a positive impact on our lives. For some of us, that's teachers, parents, and siblings. For others, that's counselors, best friends, and co-workers. Then, we meet with our teachers and they help us develop a PowerPoint presentation that lays out are strengths, interests, short-term and long-term goals, and the support that we need to accomplish such goals. Most importantly, we are deciding our goals and identifying our needs rather than being told by someone else. We create introductions to start each meeting, so that we can inform people why we are meeting and allow everyone to introduce themselves. Once introductions are complete, we run through each slide and ask that our PCP team members add information and ask questions as we go along. We also discuss with the PCP team our progress toward reaching our goals. Being able to create and lead our own presentations about ourselves makes us feel more involved in our education. It makes us feel motivated and excited that we are getting to make our own choices, rather than someone else doing it for us.

Speakers
JL

Jesse Luca

Student, CrossingPoints - The University of Alabama
CS

Clay Stone

Teacher, CrossingPoints - The University of Alabama
PT

Paul Tinker

Student, CrossingPoints - The University of Alabama



Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

I.B.-long; Enhancing Meaningful Participation of Middle Grade Students with Disabilities in International Baccalaureate Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

The mission of International Baccalaureate programs within schools strives to develop student understanding of global citizenship traits. The Learner Profile aligned to these programs embraces community engagement through appreciation of culture, diversity, and respect for the self and others. With the notions of equity and inclusion underlying the very core of International-Baccalaureate design, it is unfortunate that students with disabilities are often the very ones isolated from participation within these programs. By leveraging evidence-based supports within shared academic settings, opportunities for inclusive service learning, and explicit character-strength instruction, stakeholders can ensure that students with disabilities take on meaningful roles within these internationally-focused programs, becoming valuable global citizens beside their peers and friends.

Speakers
avatar for Meghan Edwards-Bowyer

Meghan Edwards-Bowyer

Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Improving Homework Completion Using Self-Management Strategies
Limited Capacity seats available

This poster describes a single case research study in which we taught a middle school student with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder to use self-management strategies to improve compliance with completing homework tasks. The study took place in the participant's home during the times that the family selected for homework completion. We taught the participant's mother to implement the intervention to increase sustainability. The session fits with the theme of the TASH conference, 'Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," because helping children with disabilities learn strategies to manage their own behavior increases their autonomy and makes it more likely they will be successful in school, community, and employment settings.

Speakers
SC

Susan Copeland

Professor, University of New Mexico


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Inclusive Education Practices for Adolescents With Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review
Limited Capacity seats available

Effective supplemental aids and services are important to support and maintain the least restrictive environment for students with disabilities based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This review examined inclusive education interventions as the supplemental aids and services for adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). I identified 36 studies that (a) was conducted in USA; (b) included at least one student with ID attending a junior or senior high school; and (c) attempted to demonstrate the effects of inclusive education practices. Based on these studies, I classified the practices as six types including embedded instructions, self-management instructions, peer support arrangements, inquiry lessons, cooperative learning, and other peer-mediated instructions. Then, I discussed (a) participants' characteristics, (b) inclusive contexts (e.g., class subjects), (c) interventions procedures and outcomes, (d) intervention agents, and (e) the agent's training and/or qualification. I also discussed some variations of intervention procedures that different studies used for the same type of the practices.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Involvement and Participation of Students with Severe Disabilities in SWPBS
Limited Capacity seats available

With more schools implementing schoolwide positive behavior support (SWPBS) and achieving valued student outcomes associated with these efforts, the inclusion of students with extensive support needs must be considered. These students remain programmatically and physically separated from general education instruction and activities, suggesting their limited involvement in SWPBS. In this study, a survey of school-based SWPBS coaches was completed to assess the involvement of students with extensive support needs in a single state. Results suggest that students with ESN are involved in the incentive-based components of their school's SWPBS plan; however, there were differences among respondents in the reported existence of behavior plans and crisis intervention plans. Implications and recommendations for these findings are provided.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Kurth

Jennifer Kurth

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
I am an Assistant Professor at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, NM. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, social... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Involving Parents and Siblings: A Family Systems Approach to Increasing Communication Skills
Limited Capacity seats available

One common challenge for many families of children with disabilities is communication. In many cases the children may have complex communication needs (CCN), which result in significant delays in communication (APA, 2013; National Research Council, 2001). These communicative deficits may lead to impaired social functioning and interaction, and limited verbal skills for the child (Raghavendra, Virgo, Olsson, Connell, & Lane, 2011). Communication challenges may also cause family members, especially parents and siblings, to feel disconnected from the child with CCN. Furthermore, a lack of ability to effectively communicate, and understand communication, can add additional stress family members already feel when raising a child with a disability (Bailey, Parette, Stoner, Angell, & Carroll, 2006; van Ijzendoorn et al., 2007; Marshall & Goldbart, 2008). Family member support, particularly parents and siblings, is especially crucial in helping a child develop effective communication skills (Huttenlocher, Waterfall, Vasilyeva, Vevea, & Hedges, 2010; Siller & Sigman, 2002). This conference presentation will aim to summarize the findings of four research projects in which two family-centered strategies were used to increase the communication of a child with a disability. The first strategy is the POWR parent strategy, focused on helping parents learn how to increase their child's communication skills while playing or doing a fun activity. This strategy was examined across two multiple probe single-subject design studies, one with parents of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and another with parents of children with CCN and developmental disabilities. The second strategy is an adaptation of the POWR strategy created for siblings of a child with a disability. This strategy is titled Plan, Talk, Wait, Respond. This strategy was examine across two studies: one using a multiple probe single-subject design with siblings of a child with CCN, and a case study with increased emphasis on certain aspects of the strategy. In both strategies the family members are taught four main steps: 1) Plan a fun activity that fits the child's interested and culture ; 2) Offer opportunities for communication/talk with the child; 3) Wait for the child's response; and 4) Respond to the child each time they communicate to reward the social interaction. Multiple probe single-subject designs were used to study the impact and effectiveness of the trainings with both parents and siblings across families with young children with different disabilities and CCN. Study participants represented a diverse sample of families. Findings from the studies indicate that the training for both parents and siblings positively impacted child communication behaviors during play activities. General results from the studies will be presented. In addition to a summary of the results, implications for training multiple members of the child's household will be discussed. The usefulness and potential benefits of training multiple communication partners in a more naturalistic setting will be presented. It is important to help children with disabilities and CCN learn the necessary skills to communicate in the world around them. Communication is a social issue, and can have lasting effects. Parents and siblings are the individuals who are in the best position to help these children, but are often under-utilized. These are the individuals who are around the child every day, and have the most interactions and communications with them. Educating and coaching family members on how to implement the evidence-based POWR and Plan, Talk, Wait, Respond communication strategies can potentially have very long and lasting impacts on children with communication delays. Increasing the child's communication, and teaching those most connected to them to do so, is best-practice and will increase their ability to function in society as they continue to age.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Key Components When Training Paraeducators to Ensure Student Success
Limited Capacity seats available

According to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, a primary aim of special education services is to meet the diverse needs of students with disabilities; yet, there is a wide gap between research and practice in special education. Practitioners who are familiar with evidence-based practices may not implement them accurately nor will they train their staff how to implement them. Simply acquainting practitioners with lists of evidence-based practices does not ensure accurate and effective implementation. Research has demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral skills training (BST) as an instructional method with learners with significant disabilities. Given the current high-stakes climate of teacher accountability in education and the achievement gap between students with disabilities and their peers without disabilities, effective strategies are needed to equip special education teachers with skillful repertoires of evidence-based practices (EBPs). As paraeducators are taking on more critical roles among students with disabilities in the classroom, the availability of training and professional development opportunities for these professionals continues to be lacking. The purpose of our presentation is to demonstrate to teachers and other professionals a research-based strategy when taking dense information from professional development trainings and translates that to a simple and brief training for paraeducators. This will include several components including creating a task analysis (i.e., checklist) of critical components, modeling, role-play, and ongoing feedback/coaching. Researchers will demonstrate to the audience the key steps to implementing staff training in the classroom and will also provide the audience with an opportunity to practice this skill.

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Korean Mothers of Children with Disabilities and their Experiences in the U.S.
Limited Capacity seats available

This study is to examine the extent to which Korean individuals with disabilities and their parents' attitudes and perceptions of disability have an impact on the children's transition to adulthood (including post-secondary education, employment, and independent living). It is a qualitative case study that will examine the current practices of transition for students with disabilities by listening to stories told by the participants and to gain a pragmatic understanding of the community-based transition service needs and give voices to those who may be disenfranchised or marginalized by society. Four families of individuals with disabilities will be interviewed for the case study. Data collection includes, interview, document analysis, and field observation.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

My Meeting, My Future
Limited Capacity seats available

As students with intellectual disabilities, our choices and futures are often made for us. We've been told what we want to eat, even if we didn't like it; what we should wear, even if we thought it was ugly; and what jobs we'd be best for, even if we had no interest. People have been carving our paths for us since we were children, but not anymore. It's time for us to carve our own paths. No longer are we going to sit through our IEP meetings and listen to our teachers and parents talk about us, but not engage us. We are going to explain and demonstrate how we lead our own IEP meetings and, ultimately, decide our own futures. First, we meet with our teachers, and they help us develop IEP presentations. To start, we write introductions, where we explain why we are meeting and ask people to introduce themselves to the meeting. After introductions, we run through our IEP presentation, which we complete using PowerPoint and Google Slides. We also have the options to bring work samples to show what we've been doing in school. Our presentations include all of the main and important parts to our IEP, such as our strengths, interests, needs, long-term goals, annual goals, and services. Most importantly, we identify what we need and what we want our goals to be. Our presentations align with the IEP document so IEP team members can easily follow along. After we present a slide, we ask that other team members add information or ask us questions if something needs cleared up. Having the opportunity to create our own IEP presentations and lead our own IEP meetings improves our self-determination and self-advocacy skills. It makes us feel important and more involved in our education. We are no longer sitting back and waiting on others. We are becoming independent.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

My Voice. My Participation. My Board: Leadership Training for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

With the growing power of the self-advocacy movement, community organizations are increasingly recognizing the importance and value of including individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) as full members of their governance boards and advisory councils. Many individuals with IDD have not had opportunities and experiences to prepare them for these roles. This presentation will focus on a newly developed program to address this need--My Voice. My Participation. My Board. The purpose of this presentation is to inform conference attendees about the impact of My Voice. My Participation. My Board (MVMPMB) training program on individuals with IDD and decision making boards and advisory councils. MVMPMB is a leadership training program for individuals with IDD who are interested in gaining specific skills to be more effective board of director and advisory council members.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Positive Behavior Support Parent Academies for Young Children with Challenging Behaviors
Limited Capacity seats available

The Positive Behavior Support Parent Academies were developed through a university-state department of health partnership to address persistent challenging behaviors in children between the ages of three and five with and without identified developmental disabilities. Sessions were conducted in public and private schools and community locations. Eight Parent Academy cohorts participated in five two-hour sessions designed to provide them with behavioral and visual supports strategies to understand, prevent, and replace their child's challenging behaviors and improve developmental outcomes. The curriculum employed a range of strategies to address the concerns that are often observed in children with learning, social, and communication delays. Within the five sessions of the Parent Academy, the content included an analysis of daily routines, an introduction to the fundamentals of behavior, and the development of a behavior intervention plan to address one behavior prioritized by the participants. Parents were also given complimentary visual supports kits, materials and resources to utilize in their home. Parents completed pre- and post-assessments of self-efficacy, parental stress, knowledge of positive behavior support strategies, and child problem behavior. Preliminary results suggested that parents were more confident about their ability manage their child's challenging behaviors. Parents also demonstrated increased knowledge of positive behavior supports tools and strategies. The poster will highlight the curriculum components including the didactic content as well as the activities used to facilitate caregiver engagement and peer interaction. The strategies used to facilitate the academies were unique in that the encouraged caregivers to identify family strengths as well as develop a supportive network amongst fellow cohort members. Project evaluation findings will also be presented. These quantitative and qualitative data will provide some insight to the effectiveness of the trainings and caregiver satisfaction with the training. This particular poster will focus on the Positive Behavior Support Parent Academies. These trainings presented a unique opportunity for caregivers because there had previously not been caregiver support and trainings for this age group. Additionally, this type of training had not been conducted in community settings for caregivers. The theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion," is congruent with the vision of the parent academies in that two large agencies provided support on behalf of this underserved age range. The Department of Public Health and the Center for Leadership in Disability were able to identify funds to support these trainings for families whose children aged out of the Part C early intervention system, yet were not receiving services within the school system. Many of the families were in distress because their children's behavior was causing familial stress and some were pending expulsion from daycare providers.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Recent National Data on Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

Think College, the National Coordinating Center for the US Department of Education-funded Transition and Postsecondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disability (TPSID) programs will share findings from its recent evaluation of 44 TPSID programs located at US colleges and universities in 2015-16 as well as trend data over 6 years related to inclusive course access, career development, campus membership, credential attainment and employment outcomes at these programs. The Higher Education Opportunities Act of 2008 created grants for TPSID model demonstration projects, implemented between 2010 and 2015 at 57 colleges and universities and currently being implemented from 2015 to 2020 at 44 campuses in the U.S. The data presented in this session are from a large-scale survey study of the practices and effectiveness of inclusive higher education implemented by the 25 TPSID grantees in 2015-16. The evaluation protocol implemented by the TPSID NCC was reviewed and approved by the federal Office of Management and Budget. This web-based data collection effort reflects a uniform dataset for collection of program and student variables from the TPSID demonstration projects and their partner sites across the country. These data detail student demographics, enrollment, academic, social and employment engagement, as well as reflect programmatic infrastructure. The evaluation protocol was developed in alignment with the Think College Standards for Inclusive Higher Education (Grigal, Hart, & Weir, 2011). This dataset is currently the largest and most comprehensive source of information on inclusive higher education for students with ID. This session will be a poster presentation with two presenters. The poster will display a brief explanation of the TPSID model demonstration project and the role of the TPSID NCC in evaluating the TPSID projects will be provided, as well as a graphical and visual presentation of the primary findings from recent data. Specific data to be presented include inclusive course access, career development, campus membership, credential attainment and employment outcomes at these programs. In addition to the visual poster, the presentation will include two accompanying accessible handouts that further describe the findings from 2015-2016 data related to the students who are attending college and the practices of the colleges/universities involved. Higher education for students with intellectual disability (ID) has evolved from a strongly family- and self-advocate led grassroots effort to a national movement guided by legislation. Opportunities exist for students with significant support needs to attend college as a result of both grassroots and legislative advocacy and activism. These efforts are effecting change in higher education. Raising awareness of existing higher education opportunities and the benefits to students with ID that are gained through participation in these programs through this poster presentation allows for persons with ID, families, practitioners, and others to gain knowledge that will allow them to advocate for greater access to these opportunities. Assuring access to higher education to all is a social justice issue, and we must continue to share information and increase opportunity.

Speakers
avatar for Clare Papay

Clare Papay

Senior Research Associate, Think College, UMass Boston
avatar for Cate Weir

Cate Weir

Project Director, Think College
I am the director of the Think College National Coordinating Center, focusing on inclusive postsecondary education for students with intellectual disabilities.



Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Seeking Best Ways to Document Whether and How Teacher Candidates Support Students Rising
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this poster presentation is to present findings from an interview study that explored what recent graduates and current teacher mentors associated with two inclusive teacher preparation programs would consider to be positive student outcomes as well as any associated positive mentor outcomes that result from teacher candidate participation in prek-12 classrooms -- in particular, outcomes beyond required state assessments that would indicate that students (with and without disabilities) in inclusive settings did "still rise."

Speakers
MF

Mary Fisher

Lewis University


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Self-determination in Health Care at School
Limited Capacity seats available

Data presented in this research presentation is part of a larger multiple case study that examined beliefs about and the involvement of students with intellectual disabilities and complex health care needs in their specialized health care at school. Nine cases were studied that included the following participants: focus students with intellectual disabilities and complex health care needs and their respective parents, special education teachers, school nurses, and 1:1 nurses or paraprofessionals. This research presentation is focused on findings specific to self-determination in health care at school. These findings were (a) students can realize self-determination in their health care through partial participation in their specialized health care procedures, self-reporting health issues, and making choices (b) school personnel and parents valued student self-determination in health care but were unsure how to teach and/or support self-determination in students with the most complex support needs; (c) students who demonstrated self-determination in their heath care were perceived and observed to safeguard their own health, exhibit self-confidence in their health care, and positive social-emotional adjustment to their health care needs; and (d) self-determination in health care at school was perceived to be associated with improved quality of life and adult outcomes for students, as well as decreased caregiver responsibilities and stress reported by parents. This presentation connects with the TASH theme because self-determination in health care is essential to resiliency in this population, who generally requires continuous and intensive direct health supports and medical technologies. Self-determination in health care, including self-care and health advocacy, enables individuals with disabilities to realize their basic human rights to exercise control over their bodies, be independent, and experience quality of life across their lifespan in inclusive settings.

Speakers
SB

Sarah Ballard

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Stacy Dymond

Stacy Dymond

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Stacy Dymond is professor of special education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on curriculum issues related to educating secondary and transition-age students with severe intellectual disabilities in inclusive school and community settings... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Service Dogs for 100 Please
Limited Capacity seats available

The term "service dog" is often used as a generic label including service dogs for people with disabilities, emotional support dogs, psychiatric service dogs, seizure or diabetic alert dogs and therapy dogs. A service dog is defined under ADA as a dog trained to perform a task for a person with a disability that he or she could not perform for themselves and that makes the disability less severe, serious, or painful. Service dogs are granted specific access and legal rights under ADA. Other types of specially trained dogs included under the generic "service dog" category may or may not be entitled to ADA protection and access depending on the type of duties they perform and the nature of their training. Additionally, the abuse of "service dog" designation from online sources has further complicated the issue, especially for individuals with invisible disabilities. This confusion and abuse regarding "service dog" status has caused people with disabilities to be denied access and support, while individuals without disabilities can take advantage of service dog status to gain access for untrained dogs. This situation has resulted in denial of rights for people with disabilities, a potential misperception of the purpose of service dogs, and the potential for unsafe situations for both dogs and people when they encounter untrained "service dogs" in public situations who are not properly trained to handle the complexities of community access. The purpose of this presentation is to provide information on the ADA definition of service dogs and define the purpose, training, and legal access granted to other types of assistance dogs often included in the "Service Dog" category.

Speakers
avatar for Anne Papalia

Anne Papalia

Shippensburg University


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Steps that Lead to a Degree
Limited Capacity seats available

As a self-advocate who is an undergraduate student enrolled at Georgia State University, I would like to share proper avenues and steps that one with an IEP can master to get into college and earn a degree.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Strategies for Success for Dually Classified Students
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will include a discussion and visual representation of research based strategies that benefit individuals who are both diagnosed with severe developmental disabilities and are English Language Learners (ELLs).

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Comparison of the Characteristics between the Employed and the Unemployed...
Limited Capacity seats available

Full Presentation Title: The Comparison of the Characteristics between the Employed and the Unemployed among the High School Graduates with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in South Korea
The purpose of the present study is to compare the characteristics between the employed and the unemployed among high school leavers with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities using a nationally representative data set. Data for this study were extracted from the 8th Panel Survey of Employment for the Disabled raw data from Korea Employment Agency for the Disabled in 2015. The target sample number for this study was 100. Specifically, there were 76 people with intellectual disabilities and 24 people with developmental disabilities in the data set. This study found that the employed were more likely to be male, had milder disabilities, graduated from colleges, and did not receive social security beneficiaries, had better computer skills and social skills, did not need help for daily activities, and received vocational services and vocational training than the unemployed. Also, this study revealed that the people who were employed were more satisfied about life satisfaction as well as had higher self-esteem than those who were unemployed among high school leavers with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Kyeong-Hwa Kim

Kyeong-Hwa Kim

Professor, Konkuk University
Hello~


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Effects of Positive Behavior Support on Yelling Behaviors and Social Interaction Behaviors of Toddler with Developmental Delay
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of positive behavior support on yelling behaviors and social interaction behaviors of toddler with developmental delay. The subject of this study was a 31months toddler with developmental delay. The individualized PBS consisted of intervention of antecedents & setting events, alternative behavior instruction, and consequences . The ABAB reversal design was utilized as a research design. The frequency of behaviors were measured using event recording. The results of this study were as follows: First, the positive behavior intervention reduced the frequency of yelling behaviors. Secondly, the positive behavior intervention increased the frequency of social interaction behaviors. In conclusion, the individualized positive behavior intervention reduced the frequency of yelling behaviors and increased the frequency of social interaction behaviors. Therefore, the overall quality of life of toddler with developmental delay has shown to be improved.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Life Experience of Adults who have a Sibling with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This poster will present findings of a study designed to investigate the experience of adults who have a sibling with disabilities in Korea. This study used a qualitative, grounded theory approach with eight participants. Individual semi-structured in-depth interviews and audio-recorded with all participants were conducted. Through the coding process, we constructed a paradigm model on the life of adults who have sibling with disabilities in Korea. The results of this study pointed to the importance of context and intervening conditions as well as the provision to support siblings who have people with disabilities in Korea.

Speakers
KH

Kyung-Im Han

Professor, Changwon National University
Kyung-Im Han is a professor in the Department of Special Education, Changwon National University, South Korea. Her research interest is on physical disabilities, augmentative and alternative communication, grounded theory, subjective study and teaching strategies for students with... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

The Use of Functional Communication Training for Elementary Aged Children in Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate the use of Functional Communication Training (FCT) in the educational setting. Specifically, this review sought to assess how FCT is utilized in the elementary education setting to address challenging behavior for students ages 5-12 who have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The goal of this review was to examine the existing base of literature to describe: (a) who is implementing FCT, (b) for what types of problem behaviors, (c) the language targets (e.g., one-word mands), (d) which communication systems are being utilized, and (e) the methods used to teach the language targets. To be included in this review, studies had to (a) have been published in a peer-reviewed journal before July 2016, (b) be available in English, (c) used FCT for intervention or as part of an intervention package, (d) have conducted the study in an elementary education setting, (e) used FCT to address challenging behavior, and (f) include participants between the ages of 5-12 who had either a diagnosis or educational eligibility of ASD. Results showed that FCT is most commonly used in self-contained special education classrooms or a segregated setting. Additionally, the primary interventionists identified in the research were people other than the teacher. The results indicate a need for increased research exploring the use of FCT as a behavioral intervention within integrated school settings by educational professionals to increase the social validity of FCT. The results of this literature review support the theme of this year's TASH conference by demonstrating the need for more research into behavioral intervention methods that allow for greater inclusion and participating within the educational setting.

Speakers

Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using an Apple Watch to Increase Daily Living Skills for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will discuss the effects of using wearable technology (Apple Watches) combined with an evidence-based practice (video-prompting) on independent daily living skill acquisition for students with autism spectrum disorders. The students in this project independently navigated through video prompts to watch each step of the task. This presentation will also provide an overview of video-prompting methods as well as best practices in video-prompt development. Access to this technology supports the inclusion of students with disabilities in schools and communities, increases independence, and reduces the need for socially stigmatizing external supports.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Grade Aligned Science to Students with ASD
Limited Capacity seats available

This study used a multiple probe across participants design to investigate the effects of a computer-assisted instructional package on the acquisition of science content for middle school students with autism. Poster will include: literature review, discussion of methods, visual presentation of results, implications for practice, and suggestions for future research. This presentation aligns with the conference theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion" as it demonstrates how computer-assisted instruction can be used to provide high-quality, grade-aligned academic instruction within inclusive settings.


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Using Long Road Home Activities to Encourage States to Comply with Olmstead
Limited Capacity seats available

It has been 18 years since the U.S. Supreme Court Olmstead decision (Olmstead), in which people with disabilities were expressly given the right to live in and receive services in the community. Today, people with disabilities are still having to struggle for equal opportunities to be included in the community compared to people without disabilities. The Long Road Home initiative was formed to highlight the meaning and importance of the Olmstead decision. Its goal is to raise awareness about the rights of people with disabilities by holding multiple events both in Georgia and across the country on the anniversary of Olmstead, June 22. All Long Road Home events incorporate at least two elements: (1) The sharing of stories, known as "I am Olmstead" Freedom stories, which are told by and about people who have transitioned out of nursing facilities and institutions and are now living successfully and happily in their communities; and (2) The availability of educational materials on voting as well as voter registration forms to assist people to exercise their basic citizenship right to vote.

Speakers
avatar for Cheri Mitchell

Cheri Mitchell

Advocate/Member, GA Advocacy Office/ People First of GA
Cheri Mitchell is first and foremost a Self-Advocate. She has spent the last twenty years working on behalf of people with disabilities and people who are elderly, and mentoring and supporting self-advocates across Georgia and the nation. She is dedicated to helping people get out... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Why Inclusive Education? Creating an Inclusive Culture
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with the 2017 theme, "Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion", by developing a deep understanding of why inclusive education is important and how to create an inclusive school culture for all students, including students with significant disabilities. With a focus on students with complex needs, this interactive workshop teaches the importance of equity and opportunity while discussing five essential school pillars that are the foundation for creating an inclusive mindset for both students, families, and staff. The triangle of support, consisting of personal supports, instructional and assistive technology, and curricular accommodations and modifications will be explained in detail. Students have the right to a sense of belonging in their school environments and this session prepares participants to draft their own school-wide philosophy and pillars that embrace a free and appropriate education for all.

Speakers
avatar for Yazmin Pineda Zapata, Ed.D.

Yazmin Pineda Zapata, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor, Point Loma Nazarene University
Yazmin Pineda Zapata, Ed.D., is an Assistant Professor at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego, California. Her expertise in delivering special education services has allowed her to advocate for students with varying learning differences in grades K-12. She actively presents... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Brooks, Ph.D.

Rebecca Brooks, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, CSUSM
Dr. Rebecca Brooks is an Assistant Professor in the Special Education teacher preparation and graduate program in the School of Education at California State University San Marcos. She has worked with individuals with disabilities in educational, recreational, vocational, and residential... Read More →


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

4:30pm

Working Together: Cross-Cultural Collaboration between Mothers and Special Educators
Limited Capacity seats available

Family/educator collaboration is at the heart of effective special education service delivery. This study examines the nature of family/educator interactions in the context of three Somali-American boys with autism. The mothers of the three boys represent a range of socioeconomic, marital, and educational backgrounds, much like the three teachers who also have varying levels of education and experiences with autism. Serial semi-structured interviews were used to gauge experiences and information from three different cases. A theme analysis revealed five central themes: (1) social status and level of parental education/knowledge of autism affects resource acquisition (2) teacher qualifications and background/experience can influence their role as a professional, (3) parents and professionals uniting for a common reason (4) translating families€™ goals and hopes into educational planning (5) importance of advocacy. Implications for practice will also be discussed (e.g., using different modes of communication [in-person meetings, phone calls, daily communication logs, etc.] that are comfortable to both the family and educator; opportunities for families to be involved in schools [dances, events, etc.])


Thursday December 14, 2017 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Imperial Ballroom, Salon A 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30303